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Full text of "Hardware merchandising (January-May 1904)"

\ 



Classified Index to Advertisements on last page. 



Neither Fictitious nor exorbitant 

Get LANGWELL'S BABBIT, MONTREAL. 



HARDWAMETAL 

A WeeKly Newspaper devoted to the Hard-ware, Metal, Machinery, 
Heating and Plumbing Trades in Canada. 



VOL. XVI. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JANUARY 2. 1904. 



NO. I 




* CUTLERY; 



FOR SALE BY LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES. 



a HAPPY NEW TEAR 

is assured to all who use " QUEEN'S 
HEAD" and "FLUER DE LIS" Iron— no 
worry about defective sheets and ruined rep- 
utation. Our best wishes to all our friends, 
and hearty thanks for their support which 
made 1903 a banner year. 






JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE * CO., MOKTBEAL / 
BRISTOL, ENG. Managers Canadian Branch \ 



vSiiffSKi 




THE "SAFFORD" RADIATOR 

INDISPUTABLY LEADS THE WORLD 

because of its scientifically constructed joints that dis- 
pense wholly with bolts, rods and packing, which im- 
provements we control, and which not only- make the 
" Safford " positively non-leakable, but give it the ability 
to stand nearly double the pressure of any other Radiator. 
It is perfect in construction. 



Perfect Circulation 
Perfect Operation 



Perfect Radiation 
Perfect Satisfaction 



are its predominant characteristics guaranteed by the 
largest Radiator manufacturers of the British Empire. 

Illustrated Booklet free on application explaining why no Radiator tested 
honestly against a "Safford " has ever proven Its equal In power or circulation. 



THE DOMINION RADIATO R CO., Limited 

Head Office and Works: 348-376 DUFFERIN ST. ■ TORONTO, CAN. 

BRANCHES: Montreal, Quebec, St John, N B, Winnipeg and Vancouver, B.C. 



FIRE-PLACE GOODS 



\A/e carry all styles of Fire-Place needs. 



Seasonable 
Goods 

Coal Vases 
Fenders 



Fire 



Screens 



Gas Logs 



Andirons 



Grates 



Mantles- 



Tiling 



for Walls 
or Floors 




Write for Trade Prices. 



Winter 

Household 

Needs 

Hot-Water 
Kettles 

Chafing 
Dishes 

[ Hot-Water 
Plates 

Coffee 
Extractors 

Spirit 
Stoves 

Gas Grates 

Coal Tongs 

Wood 
Boxes 

etc. 



T* 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 

COR. KING AND VICTORIA STS, 



TORONTO. 







HARDWARE AND METAL 

THE CANADIAN ROBBER CO. 

of Montreal. 



No Hard Blades Razor. 
No Soft Blades 
No Temper Streaks 
No Returned Blades to the dealer- 
Shave for Years Without Re- 
quiring " >ning 

For Sal* by all Leading Jobbers 

-S- A.L8ILBEBSTEII 



BOOKLET 
COMING- 

if you'll ask for 
a copy with 
trade discount. 



Mfrs. of 



y^/tc 




453^61 Broadway, New York City. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



G 



Rubber Belting, 
Hose, Packing, 
Valves, Gaskets, 



ETC, ETC 



We make a specialty of 

HORSE SHOE PADS 

the best in the market. 



Write for Price* and Circular*. 



Head Office : : MONTREAL 

BRANCHES-TORONTO, WINNIPEG and VANCOUVER 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 




"YANKEE" 
RATCHET SCREW DRIVER 
_N°I5 




Our "YANKEE" Tool Book 
tells all about them. M ailed 
free on application 



No. 15. "Yankee" Ratcbet Sorew Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 




fcu:i,"..iir.l, 



No. 30- "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




No. 41. "Yankee" Automatic Drill, Eight Drill Points In Handle. 




Manufacturers also ot 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chipper s. 
Fluting Machines, 

Hand Fluters. 



No. 60. "Yankee" Reciprocating Drill for Iron, Steel, Braas, Wood, etc. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 




NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 



No. 60. 

Pooket Magazine 

Sorew Driver. 



Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



OFFICE OF 

THOS. BIRKETT&SON CO., Limited, 

Wholesale Hardware Merchant, 

Ottawa, - Can. 



TO OUR CUSTOMERS: 

Allow us to congratulate you on the 
increased business done during the year now 
drawing to a close, and may we venture the wish 
that together we may enjoy the era of prosperity 
which the rapid expansion of our Dominion points 
forward to. 

Wishing you the Compliments of the Season. 



We are, 



Yours respectfully, 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., Limited. 





TJ^ 


JNgBi 


The 


;Sjp^ 


Russwin 


/l^fe 


Food 


J* 


Cutter. 


CLEANLINESS. 


There is no drip from the Russwin to soil clothing and 
floors. The gutter carries all juices to the dish — they are not 
deposited upon the floor. The machine itself is quickly cleaned 
with the least possible effort. Write for Booklets, Posters 
and Electrotypes to assist you. 


Russell & Erwin Mfg. Co. 


New Britain, Conn., U.S.A. 



(* 



BRASS 



SHEETS, RODS, TUBES. 



M.& L SAMUEL, BENJAMIN & CO. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 

27 Wellington St. West, -^-TORONTO, ONT. 



EUROPEAN HOUSE 16 PHILPOT LANE, LONDON, ENQ. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE 
LATEST 

ATTRACTIVELY 
LABELED 







723 



701 



Values 



11 




QUOTE 
LOW 



OUR 

THOUSAND PAGK 

CATALOG 

slum's over 35 styles of 

WHIPS. 

Our prices enable you to sell them low at a 
GOOD PROFIT. 

LEWIS BROS. & CO. 




793 



SHIP 
QUICK 



THE 
GREATEST 

ELEGANTLY 
FINISHED 



111 




731 



e£3 



770 



Tnanmi-rn „ .. « - _ Address all correspondence to H M 

TORONTO. 87 YORK ST. OTTAWA, 54 QUEEN ST. VANCOUVER, ,4, WATER ST. MONTREAL 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, Limited 




MONTREAL MILL, ESTABLISHED 1825. 



BINDER TWINE. 



We manufacture the following brands : 

Blue Ribbon 
Red Gap 



6SO -ft. jp&r pound. 

600 -Ft. 

5SO ft. 
Golden Grown 500 ft. 

Standard - - 500 ft. 
Sisal - SOO ft. 

The above Brands have stood the test for years, and are the Farmers' Favorites. 

Out of 14 lots of Binder Twine, seized and confiscated by the Government Binder Twine Inspector this year, only one 
was Canadian. 

Dealers, who handle our Twine, will secure a satisfactory article, and, at the same time, help to build up one of our 
oldest industries. 

See our Samples before placing your order elsewhere. 

Consumers Cordage Company, Limited. Head Office, Montreal, Que. 



CARRIAGE AND SADDLERY HARDWARE 



Hardware and 
Met.l 




and Carriage Clothing 



Branch Agency : 

W. LOUIS HALDIMAND, Jr., 

36 St. Dizier Street, 
MONTREAL, - QUE., 



Branch Agency : 

CHAS. THOMPSON, 

420 Cordova St. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



Fishermen's Clothing, Horse Covers, Dash Aprons, 

Teamsters' Clothing, Wagon Covers, Knee Rugs 

ASK FOR QUOTATIONS. 

The Guelph Waterproof Clothing Co., Guelph, Ontario. 




r COVERT MFG. CO 



West Troy, N.Y 

Auto Screw Jack 

Harness Snaps Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BV JOBBERS AT MFKS. PRICE 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 




Largest Variety, 

Toilet, Hand, Electric Powerl 

ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Sheep-Sheariog Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

SEND FOB CATALOGUE TO 
American Shearer Mfg. Co., Nashua, N.II.,1 SA 




Oneida Community Goods 

HALTERS, COW TIES, SNAPS, •to., etc., 

In all sizes and styles. May be had of all 

Jobbers throughout Canada. 

Faotory— NIAGABA FALLS, ONT 



SOLARINE 

Wishes its friends and patrons a 

Very Happy and Prosperous 

New Year. 



H. F. Falkiner, 



Toronto. 



We desire to call your attention to some of our specialties which are handled extensively 

by the general hardware trade. 



Horse Blankets (aii kinds) 
Rubber and Oiled Knee Rugs 



Burlington-Stay-on Blankets 
Plush and Woollen Knee Rugs 



If you handle the above, it will be of interest to you to write us. 

Samuel Trees & Co., Toronto 



The Trees, Spriggs Co., Limited, 

Winnipeg, Man. 

Importers and Manufacturers of Saddlery Goods. 



Done on Purpose 

The Dunlop Side Wire Tire is made on purpose to stay 
on and it will not come off the wheel until it is taken off on 

purpose. The retaining wire does 
not wear against the rubber of the tire, 
but upon cross bars vulcanized into it 
at regular intervals. The wire cannot 
cut into the rubber and the tire cannot 
wear away from the rim of the wheel 
— it is held so firmly and with such 
equal force. The side wire is an improvement that improves. 

Get this good thing for your customers. Prices and catalogues on application. 




L 



THE DUNLOP TIRE CO., Limited, 
TORONTO, CANADA. 

Agencies: Montreal, St. John, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 





The Sales You Lose... 

represent just so much money lost. In the matter of robes, for example, "you 
c an do a clean cut, profitable business if you sell the right sort of robes. 

"Arctic" Buffalo Robes 

are sensible, durable, attractive, profitable. They are easily sold, for they 
sell themselves, with a very little talk on your part. Order a sample. 

Made of rich, dark brown fur, lined with red or dark green Astrachan cloth, interlined with rubber ; 
nicely trimmed ; rain, wind and moth proof ; 52 x 54 ; 62 x 54 ; 72 x 54. 

rlin Robe & Clothing Co., 

LIMITED 

Berlin, Ontario. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

We thank our Friends and Patrons for the generous support given 
us since we embarked in the wholesale business. We wish one and all 
a Prosperous and Happy New Year. 



The Kennedy Hardware Co. 

49 Colbome Street, TORONTO. 



LIMITED, 




v^ 



HOCKEY STICKS. 

Made of the best selected and seasoned stock — carefully modelled 
and finished. To retail at from 10c. to 50c. each. 



^ 



NERLICH & CO., 146=8 Front st. w., Toronto 



•x •*■><.) 



Steel Frame Churn 



MAXWELL MOWER 

8-inch Low Wheel. 




DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 



ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA. 



44 Maxwell Favorite Churn" Lawn Mowers. 



PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever 
Drive, and Detachable Driving Link. Improved 
for season of 1904. Steel or Wood Frame as 
desired. 



Wheelbarrows. 



In Four Different Sizes. 



12 in. to 20 in. widths. Cold 
Rolled Steel Shafting, Cru- 
cible Steel Knives ami Cutting Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you these 
articles 

SEND DIRECT TO US. 



"THE MAXWELL" 

Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inche 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



IRON 



Bars in Flats, Rounds, Squares, 
Ovals, Half =Ovals, Half Roundsand 
Bands. Also Wrought Washers. 

(IOOD QUALITY. PROHPT SHIPMENT. 



London Rolling Mill Co. 



Limited, 



LONDON, CANADA. 



STEEL 



PAGE-HERSEY IRON & TUBE CO., 



GUELPH, CANADA, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 



Limited 



BLACK AND GALVANIZED 

WROUGHT MERCHANT PIPE 

OF SUPERIOR QUALITY AND FINISH. 



The New Century Ball-Bearing 
Washing Machine. 




Not the cheapest but decidedly the best Washing 
Machine made. 

Five to seven minutes only required for a tubful. 

The operator need not stand when using it, and there is practically 

no wear on garments. 

Full information given on application. 

THE DOWSWELL MANUFACTURING CO., 

Hamilton, Ont. Limited 

W, L HALDIMiND « SON, Montreal, - Eastern Agents. 




<£ Australasian «£ 
Hardware and Machinery, 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
and Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 



Fink's Buildings. 

Post Office Chambers. 



post free to any part of the world. 

PUBLISHING OFFICES: 

Melbourne 
Sydney, 
BRITISH OFFICES!: 

London, - • 42 Cannon St.,E.C. 
CANADIAN AND AMERICAN ENQUIRIES will receive prompt 
attention if addressed to the LONDON OFFICE, 42 CANNON 
STREET, E.C. 
t— J jAI _^» ..._i Specimen Copies Free on Application- 






HARDWARE AND METAL 



A Prosperous 
New Year 



is our wish for every reader 
of Hardware and we sug- 
gest that a very material 
assistance in making it pos- 
sible will be found in carry- 
ing our line of bright steel 
shafting. Write for our 
proposition. 



Hn of Toronto, 
UU., Limited, 

TORONTO. ONT. 



We desire to extend to our 
many friends our sincere 
thanks for their kind patron- 
age during the past year. 



It is our earnest wish that 
the New Year may be a 
Prosperous and Happy one 
for all. 



Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co. 

LIMITED. 
MONTREAL AND TORONTO. 



PERFORATED SHEET METALS 



in 



All sizes of Perforations an 
thickness of metals for 




»tc. 



MINERS' USE, 
GRAIN CLEANING 

MACHINERY, 
BEE KEEPERS, 
MALT KILN FLOORS, 
ETC. 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., LIMITED, "-J^'^g.^'S., 

American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York 

Empire Building 



Montreal 

N. Y. Life Building 



Chicago 

The Rookery 



BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED PLAIN WIRE 

PLAIN TWIST CABLE FENCING 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire; Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of 
every description; Rail Bonds, Bale Ties, Special Wires for all 
purposes, Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold-drawn Steel 
Shafting. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Established 1854 
Phone Main 1706 



thb GEO. B. MEADOWS 



Toronto Wire, Iron an Brass Works Company, Limited. 
Manufacturers of Wire Window Guards, Wire Cloth , 
Moulders' Riddles, Children's Cots, Bank and Office 
Railings, Ornamental Iron Fencing, Window Fix- 
tures, Wire Work, Architectural Wrought Iron 
Work. llrj King st We8t) TORONTO, ONT 



1 



Their cost is so trifling 

and their convenience so great that the wonder is 
that merchants do without RUBBER STAMPS. 
Tell us what you would like and we'll tell 
you the cost. 

C. G. Young Co., i Adelaide E., Toronto 



Ice 
Tools 



of all sorts. A 
good time for the 
hardware dealer. 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICE LIST 

ROBT. DONALDSON & SONS. 

30 Youville Square, • - MONTREAL. 




F"ull NA/oight: 
Full Count 

in all our orders of 
wrapping paper. Inferior paper 
does not give you both weight 
and count as our brown and 
maniila does. They are strong 
and durable. 

CANADA PAPER CO. 

Limited 
Toronto, Montreal and Windsor Mills, Que. 



TRUCKS 

for Warehouse 
and Factory. 

Save You Money 
Do Men's Work 
Draw no Salary 

Our Trucks are guaranteed satisfactory. 
Turn in their own length. 

MADE IN CANADA. 

H. C. Slingsby for Canada. 




Factory, 

Ontario Street, 



Temple Building, 

MONTREAL. 



IRONSID 



for IRON 



Our Specialties are British and Foreign Iron and Steel, Metals, Bars, Plates, Sheets, Bolts 
and Nuts, Tin Plates, etc. 

We are sole Licencees for Page's Patent Wire Stretcher and also for Ironside's Patent 
Wire Cutters. 

We Publish Monthly a "CANADIAN METAI. PRICE LIST," giving quotations in Dollars and Cents, 
(C.I.F,). also 'WEEKL.Y MARKET REPORT." 

Let us have your name and address for ' PRICE LIST" aod "MARKET REPORT." 

IRONSIDE, SON £» CO., l6 22r£S '» ... .*. London, England. 

6. A. Crosby & Co. of Ontario, 

SARNIA, ONT. 




LIMITED 



Manufacturers of- 



"Ojr 



Patent Automatic Can Making Machinery, Presses, 
Dies and Special Machinery for Working Sheet Metal 

H. W. Petrle, 141-145 Front Street West, TORONTO- Selling Agent. 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON -EJECTING 



12, 16 and 20 Guage. 
Steel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
Take Down ' 
Gun Made 




CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 




Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc 

ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. STO^SFgtf 1 Chamber8 st 

MONTREAL STEEL WORKS, 



successors to- 



LIMITED. 



The Canada Switch and Spring Co., Limited. 

- Manufacturers of 



IIM 



(OPEN 
HEARTH 
3YSTEM.V 



SPRINGS, FROGS, SWITCHES, SIGNALS, for Steam and Electric Railways 
CANAL BANK, POINT ST. CHARLES, MONTREAL- 

STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO., 

NEW BRITAIN, CONN., U.S.A. 



IMPROVED CARPENTERS' 
TOOLS. 



SOLD BY ALL HARDW ARE 
DEALERS. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishingto be representedin Canada. 




IMPROVED 
WASHING MACHINE. 



The rubbing board in this washer works eccentrically on 

the clothes in such a way that it both rubs and squeezes the 

clothes with every stroke of the rubbing hoard. 

LARGEST CAPACITY. STRONGLY MADE. 

NEATLY FINISHED. 

THE BEST FOR THE MONEY. 

We have nine other kinds, send for our catalogue. 

J. H. CONNOR & SON, Limited 

Manufacturers 

Washing Machines and Clothes Wringers, 

Pretoria Ave., '^ OTTAWA 



CM AS. P. CLARK, President. 



JARED CHITTENDEN, Tretiunr. 



.ESTABLISHED 1849... 



Japital and Surplus, $1,600,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices: Nob. 346 and 848 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRAD8TREET COMPANY gathers Information that reflects the financial conditlou and the 
.■on' rolling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the merchants. 
>>y the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating Information no effort is spared, and 
no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may Justify its claim as an authority on all matters 
affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have been steadily extended, and It 
•jir ilahes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, Jobbing ai.' 
nan ifacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. Specific 
terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



OFFICES IN CANADA- 



HALIFAX, N.8. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPEG. MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C. IRVING. Gen. Man. Wester Canada, Toronto. 
* 



Cable Address, 
"Bliss." 



l''™i'!"' ■--? Pltai,** 



Sg$i 



Canadian Representative: 
75 YEARS 



Established 
1882. 

MANDFACTIIRESS | 

Wood Turnings, Hand, 
Bench and other Screws 
Mallets, Handles, Vises 

Clamps, Tool Chests 

Croquet, Lithographs 
Wood Toys, Novelties 

and also the celebrated 

Wood's Patent Car 
Gate 

For Street and Steam Rail- 
road Cart, 

The R. BLISS MFG. CO. 

Pawtubket, R.I., U.8.A 



ALEXANDER GIBB, 13 St. John St., MONTREAL. 
ESTABLISHED 1825. 75 YEAHS 





EVOLUTION IN RAZOR GRINDING. 





THE AMERICAN DOUBLE: HOLLOW. 

Have you ever seen a razor too good to be used on your face ? 

The old-fashioned way to grind a razor was the F.nglish full hollow, but it was found that, if ground thick, it was harsh on the face, if very thin it would 
vibrate or would not shave clean. 

About 30 years ago a new style of grinding was invented, the German full concaved; this was found better; it had only one fault, being thick above the 
edge it cannot easily be kept sharp on a strop, you have to hone it very often. We are making a newly Patented Razor, the American Double Hollow, which 
has two distinct hollows. This razor, if properly used on a strop, practically never needs honing, because it is so thin above the edge. Try it and you will 
be more than pleased. 

/Caverhlll, Lcarmont .5. Co., Montreal. fipfi W ViYDM D A 7flD MW Pff LITTLE VALLEY, N.Y. 



4GENTS FiiK CANADA 



I Rice Lewis &> Son, Limited, Toronto. 



GEO. W. KORN RAZOR MFG. CO., 



V. S. A. 



ID 




% 








''■?'■*- 




Ok 














a\ 









No man ever made money by disappointing a 
good customer. 

This is the label that most of the women are look- 
ing for; they will be disappointed if they can't find 
it on some of the freezers on your floor. 

We don't ask you to handle Peerless Icelands 
exclusively, but we know from experience of others 
that if you put a few on your floor, they will soon 

be your leaders. 

There is a demand for Peerless Icelands 
caused by magazine advertising and sus- 
tained by the freezer itself; don't let the 
other fellow do all the business. 




Ask your jobber. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ComeOut 



OF THE 



DARK! 



Bring your 
"witK you. 



ids" 



ILLUSTRATE ! ! 

By doing so you illumine 
and release from obscurity 
many a cheerless "type ad" 
'that is suffering for the want 
of a little pictorial light. 

We furnish the kind of pic- 
tures that give to your "ads" 
a bright and smiling counte- 
nance. A cheerful luce gains 
favor every time. 

Estimates on all and every 
style of design cordially fur- 
nished. 



ART DEPARTMENT 

MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. 



LIMITED 

Montreal. Toronto, 



Winnipeg, 



FLAT.— SPIRAL or VOLUTE 

INTERESTING CATALOG MAILED ON APPLICATION 

THE WALLACE BARNES CO. ! 

BRISTOL CONN. 



The John Bowman Hardware 
and Coal Co., 

LONDON, - = ONT. 



CUTTERS 




SEND US YOUR ORDERS. 



GRAJ1T 



18 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Canadian Cordage 

& MFG. Co., Limited. 

BINDER TWINE. 






"ROYAL" MANILA, 
"ROYAL" MANILA, 
"ROYAL" MANILA, 
"ROYAL" MANILA, 
STANDARD, - 
SISAL, 



650 ft. to the pound. 
600 ft. to the pound. 
550 ft. to the pound. 
500 ft. to the pound. 
500 ft. to the pound. 
500 ft. to the pound. 



Our " ROYAL " Brand of Binder Twine is manufactured of the finest raw material that 
can be obtained, and with the utmost care. For length and strength we have no competitors. 
Our Twine is manufactured with the latest machinery, and dealers desiring to have exclusive 
agencies should apply at once. Will name lowest prices, or will enter contracts without price 
named until The International Harvester Co. announces prices. 



Wire, Write or 'Phone. 

CANADIAN CORDAGE & HFQ. CO., Limited 

Peterborough, Ont. 

13 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



EASY RUNNING 



A CHILD 

CAN 

USE 

IT. 



NOT HIGH PRICED 



A MAN 

CAN 

AFFORD 

IT. 



The Woodyatt 

Lawn Mower 




PATENTED IN CANADA. GREAT BRITAIN 
AND UNITED STATES. 



Manufactured by 



Taylor - Forbes Co., 



Guelph, Ont. 



Limited. 



At the Largest and Best Equipped Hardware 
Factory in Canada. 



SIMPLE IN 

CONSTRUCTION 



A MECHANIC 

CAN 

APPRECIATE 

IT. 



QUALITY THE BEST 



A DEALER 

CAN 

GUARANTEE 

IT. 



> 



- 



C6CeSSQ80eQecaS3S0eSS3SS080608Q^^ 

THE BEST RESULTS ALWAYS FOLLOW THE SALE AND USE OF 



KEMP'S 



BROAD HOOP ROLL RIM 
BOTTOM MILK CAN TRIMMINGS 





A criticising public have used them for the past five years and the increasing 
demand is proof of their superiority, also evidence of the satisfaction 
which they give 

The Roll Kim Bottom having no sharp turns does not break the grain of the 
metal or lessen its wearing qualities. 

Narrow Top Hoops can be supplied in place of Broad Top Hoops if desired. 

For Strength, Durability and Finish our Trimmings are unexcelled. 

They cost no more than inferior qualities. 

We also carry in stock a full line of First Quality Tinned Iron, cut suit- 
able for the different size of Trimmings, which we will supplj at the 
lowest current market quotations. 

KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO, CANADA. 

14 




Classified List of Advertisements on Pages 63 and 64. 



Hard-wars and 
Metal 



IMPRESSIONS OF THE GREAT WEST 

Gathered During a Transcontinental Tour with the Canadian Manufacturers' Association. 

By W. L. E. 



t<*^j*+^\fmt^^f**rJ\jm 








UR trip down the Arrowhead 
and Kootenay lakes was one 
we shall remember all our 
days. The weather conditions 
were not all we could have 
desired, but we enjoyed ourselves, never- 
theless. When we left Arrowhead on one 
of the two stern-wheel steamers, which 
the C.P.R. has on that route, the rain 
was falling briskly and the clouds hung 
like thick gossamers around the moun- 
tains which skirt Arrowhead lakes — which, 
by the way, are but the widening- out of 
the Columbia river, which we saw for the 
first time at Field, on the main line of 
the C.P.R. — shutting- out peaks from our 
view. I do not intend entering into a 
discussion of the logic or the illogic of 
Samuel Johnston's remark to the effect 
that the state of the weather has nothing 
to do with men's moods. All I know is 




Sunshine on Kootenay Lake. 

that unfavorable weather at any rate 
did not permanently effect our state of 
mind. The fact that we were in good 
company no doubt is the partial expla- 
nation of this, for we know that there is 
nothing- better in the world than good 
company. It is the spice of life, and its 
presence makes melancholy next to impos- 
sible. In good company one. can only be 
melancholy by premeditation. But be- 
sides the spice of good company an ex- 
ceedingly good dinner was served us on 
board in the evening, notwithstanding 
that the steamer had more than its usual 
quota of passengers. We had nothing 
better on the whole of our itinerary trip. 
The same applies to the waiters, who 
were young, and had more the appearance 
of three or four year university students 
than anything else. They were bright 
and intelligent looking fellows, and knew 
how to be attentive. The cook who sat- 
isfactorily supplied the wants of the in- 



ner man — which of course means the wants 
of the inner woman as well — was a China- 
man, and had been in his present posi- 
tion about 13 years. His assistants were 
also from the "Flowery Kingdom.'' One 
of the pleasures of the trip was to see 
him and his staff preparing our meal. 
Everything was done systematically, and 
there was no flurry nor any exhibition of 
temper. They seemed quite- unconcerned 
and no more perturbed because of the 
extra demands upon them than if they 
were preparing- a meal for an ordinary 
family. More than one of us possibly 
imagined what would have been our ex- 
perience if we had been crowding around 
the female cook in some of our homes 
under such conditions. It is altogether- 
likely we would have been forced to beat 
a hasty retreat. The kitchen was situ 
ated on the lower deck of the steamer 
and was open to the -new of those who 
were disposed to visit that part of the 
steamer — and a good many were disposed. 
* * * 

But the manner of embarking ^md dis- 
embarking passengers interested us possi- 
bly more than anything else during the 
trip down (he lakes, for the 125 miles 
between Arrowhead and Robson, where 
our journey down Arrowhead lake began 
and ended respectively, we did not see 
any wharves. When it was necessary to 
put a passenger off or on, the steamer 
made- for the side of the lake and ran 
close to the shore. Then a narrow 
gangway and sometimes two gangways, 
one on top of the other, was pushed out 
from the deck to the shore, and up and 
down this the passenger ran, possibly 
with a couple of grips in his hands, while 
we held our breath expecting- every min- 
ute to see him topple over, so steep was 
the incline and narrow the gangway. 
But I suppose the people in that part of 
the country are used to walking such 
gangways. At night the process of em- 
barking and disembarking- passengers w as 
even more interesting than in the day 
time. Commercial travellers and others 
who wanted to get on board our boat, 
lit bonfires on the shore. These bonfires, 
particularly in the darkness of the night, 
with the black mountains as a back- 
ground, made a wierd picture indeed. 
Some of these bonfires were of large 
proportions, and it was a wonder to us 
why they wasted so much cordwood for 
such a purpose, but then of course wood 
15 



along the shore there is of no value, and 
there is an abundance of it. When one of 
these bonfires was sighted by the man at 
the wheel, the prow (of our steamer was 
turned towards it, while the powerful 
searchlights on either side of the boat 
were brought into play to light our way 
to the shore. These searchlights [out one 
in mind of a glaring two eyed monster; 
and the sight to the passenger who was 
watching us -on shore, must have been a 
striking one indeed. Frequently there 
would be no sign of any habitation at 
spots where we stopped to take on or 
put off' passengers. At least the search- 
lights, as they ranged along the shore 
for some distance penetrating into the 
forest and valleys between the mountains, 
revealed none. At such spots, when a 
passenger was put off-, the steamer was 
kind enough to turn one of its search- 




A Coming Storm on Kootenay Lake. 

lights shoreward in front of him as we 
steamed away to guide him on his way 
through boulders, trees and fallen trunks, 
until we came to a sharp bend in t In- 
shore, hiding hin. from our view. Of 
course, during (he landing anil embarking 
of passengers we easterners could scarcely 
refrain from passing- jocular remarks, 
and particularly when a passenger would 
ascend the gangway as if he was walking 
a tightrope, we were always liberal in 
our applause when his feet touched the 
deck of the steamer ; or, when he was 
descending, and was safely on shore. It 
was astonishing how quickly our steamer 
was turned, and how easily it was hand- 
led. The engineer in charge of the 
steamer informed us that this was due to 
the fact that instead of possessing one 
rudder, as is usual with ordinary steam 
ers, she was equipped with two very 
powerful ones. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HOW A BICYCLE FORTUNE BEGAN. 

OOMR soars ago a clerk in a coal office 
vj m a Western city grew tired of his 
bicycle and advertised it for sale, 
says an exchange. At 9 o'clock the next 
morning a buyer came, and the wheel was 
sold. At 9.30 tame another inquiry, and 
at 10 two more. They were told they 
were too late. Then the clerk got to 
thinking, and when two more men came 
to buy he did not tell them his wheel was 
sold. He made some excuse for not show- 
ing it, and asked them to call the next 
afternoon. At lunch time he hurried to a 
newspaper office and advertised to buy a 
second-hand bicycle. Then came more 
inquiries who were put off as had been 
the last two. 

The next day there was a procession of 
sellers of wheels. With each the clerk 
agreed upon a price, to be paid if one day's 
trial proved satisfactory. And there was 
also a procession of- buyers, to whom one 
by one were sold, at an advance, the 
wheels left for trial. Thus the clerk found 
himself doing a profitable little bicycle 
business. Then his employer objected to 
the loss of his time and to having the 
place cluttered up with second-hand 
wheels. So the clerk thought some more, 
and at noon arranged with a boy who 
worked across the street at a small store 
with a shed behind it, to receive and store 
the bicycles and help sell them. Mean- 
while the advertising went on and present- 
ly the clerk left his place in the coal office 
to devote all his time to selling second- 
hand bicycles. His business grew, and 
from dealing in old he passed to selling 
new bicycles, and afterwards to manufac- 
turing them. To-day he has a national 
reputation and his wealth runs up in the 
millions. — Iron and Machinery World. 



THE PERSONALITY OF THOMAS A. 
EDISON. 

I^HOMAS A. EDISON is 58 years old. 
Almost his entire time is passed 
among the buildings of his labora- 
tory, either in the library, the galvano- 
meter loom or the chemical room. It is 
a common practice for him to have his 
dinner sent to him from the house, and 
to remain at his labors throughout the 
night. 

lie often passes ten or twelve hours at 
a time in a room from which every ray 
of light has been excluded, He told the 

writer thai he is SO accustomed to doing 
so. that now. after he has been in the 
dark room several hours, objects are 
distinctly visible to him there as they arc 
ordinarily in the daylight out of dons 



"After I have been in the dark room 
ten hours or more." he said. "I can see 
to read ordinary print without any other 
light than that which sifts through solid 
wood and walls, or emanates from the 
body. It is wonderful how supersensitive 
the eyes will become. Prisoners who are 
locked away for years in utter darkness 
can see things there as readily as you or 
I /-an in the sunlight." 

He likes good stories. He likes to tell 
them and to listen to them. His appre- 
ciation of humor is as keen as his appre- 
ciation of a new invention. Flis manner 
is always gentle, kindly and thoroughly 
unassuming. 

He is not a draughtsman. He sees his 
ideas in the ether around him. describes 
them, and directs somebody else to put 
them on paper for him. 

He has little appreciation of a drawing 
after it is made. It is nothing but a 
fiat surface, which represents measure- 
ments ; but when the parts are made 
from the drawings nothing delights him 
more than to see them go together. 

He likes a good cigar, but says "they 
smoke to'o easy." That is. he is apt to 
smoke too many of them if they are 
within reach. 

His power of concentration is phenom- 
enal. When he is at work time ('eases, 
and he is quite as intense over a letter 
lie is reading as when absorbed in his 
favorite occupation of working out a 
difficult problem. Every man in his em- 
ploy loves him, and this is high praise. 
His eyes are as bright as stars : his face 
is the face of a babe ; his smile is as in- 
genuous as a young girl's ; his hand- 
clasp is firm and hearty ; his step is 
brisk and energetic. He is an affectionate 
and a lovable man. 



THE VILLAGE BLACKSMITH. 

^1 A HE "village blacksmith," whose 
JL place of business is poetically de- 
scribed as being " beneath the 
spreading chestnut tree," was a man of 
great physical strength, but small skill. 
He hammered out heavy iron tires and 
bolts and made a rough job of shoeing 
horses. 

Our admiration for the blacksmith 
of Goldsmith 's day is lessened when we 
consider what horses have suffered in the 
past from the general ignorance of the 
men who practised horse shoeing. They 
simply nailed the shoes to the horses' 
feel as if they were fastening pieces of 
iron to blocks of wood. It was the cus- 
tom to pare down the sole and frog of 
the hoof and tear away the crust with a 
rasp. The hot iron was then placed 
against the hoof and burned into place. 

16 



Iron shoes have been fastened to 
horses' feet since an early period and 
it s remarkable that until comparatively 
recent times neither science nor care 
were practised in the art. Anatomy 
teaches that the horse was once a four- 
toed animal and that the hoof of the 
modern horse is an elongated middle toe 
with the nail expanded and grown into 
a hoof. The purpose of the iron cover- 
ing is to protect the hoof from wear up- 
on stoney roads, but the evil of it is 
that it destroys the cushioning proper- 
ties of the hoof, and seriously impairs 
the working life of the animal. In cities 
merchants owning horses, working over 
asphalted and macadamized roads, are 
using rubber pads which set getween 
the hoof and the shoe. The Dunlop 
horse-shoe pad is finding a wide sale 
upon its recommendation to prolong the 
working life of horses. The Toronto 
office of the company will mail full par- 
ticulars of the device upon receipt of 
inquiry. 



HARDWARE TESTIMONIALS. 

" I cannot speak too highly of your 
razors. I took one of them to party last 
night and cut quite a figure in the scrim- 
mage with which it wound up. "—Ebon 
Black, of Blackville. 

" Your grindstones are up to the 
limit. A politician came along yester- 
day with an ax to grind, and I let him 
turn the stone while I ground four axes 
of my own. He had the real grit and 
so did the grindstone. " — Farmer Cofn- 
tassel, of Wayback. 

" Your augers are great on the bore. 
1 took one of them the other day and 
knocked down a fellow who came to talk 
to me about life insurance and politics." 
— Wood Carpenter. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 

WIRE^m. 

Prompt Shipment' 



The ONTARIO TACK CO 

Limited 
HAMILTON ONT. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

Hardware and Metal would be pleased to review 
catalogues, booklets or other such publications issued 
by uianufcturers or wholesale dealers selling to the 
hardware, plumbing, machinery or metal trades. Re- 
tailers desiring such publications may also have inserted 
a note to that effect. No charge will be made for these 
services. 

POWER TRANSMISSION. 

The Dodge Mfg. Co., Toronto Junc- 
tion, are sending out the December num- 
ber of their bright publication, "Power 
Transmission Economics." The char- 
acter of the volume may be understood 
by the following from its contents: 
" Why Take Chances -by Buying Infer- 
ior Products?" " The Wood Split 
Pulley-Its History, " ' ' Belting, ' ' 
" The 60,000 Horse-power Plant at St. 
Louis," " Pertaining to Vertical 
Drivers," " To Clean Leather Belting," 
" The Latest Friction Clutch for Small 
Powers." The articles are all well 
written and authoritative. If you have 
not received a copy of the booklet ask 
for one. 

J. STEVENS ARMS AND TOOL CO. 

Complete to an exceptional degree is 
the new edition of Catalogue No. 50, 
issued by the J. Stevens Arms & Tool 
Co., Chicopee Falls, Mass. It contains 
detailed information for the trade re- 
garding the single-shot target and sport- 
ing rifles, single and double barrel shot- 
guns, single-shot pistols, barrels, rifle, 
telescopes, sights, etc. As Stevens' 
arms are known and handled in all parts 
of Canada and the United States the 
demand for this catalogue will probably 
be very heavy, so those desiring a copy 
should write early for it. 

goudey-m'lean CO. 

" Hardware and Metal " is in re- 
ceipt of several bulletins from the Gou- 
dey-McLean Co., manufacturers of elec- 
trical machinery, Liberty street, New 
York, describing the construction of 
several types of the generators and 
motors and also one of their transform- 
ers. The bulletins are very neat, the 
reading matter being very concise and 
to the point, and being illustrated with 
splendid cuts showing admirably the 
construction of the various parts. 

In the construction of these machines 
no very startling innovations are to be 
noticed, but there are«everal features of 
them which are quite original and are 
worthy of mention. 

One of these features is the improved 
method of making the coil connections. 
Instead of a loose and cumbersome cable 
connection around the outside of the 
frame to the terminal board, substantial 
connection studs are led through the 
frame to the terminal board and are 



A NEW YEARS 
GREETING. 

A happy and successful New Year is our greeting 
to all S.W.P. Agents and Friends. 

We enter upon the New Year with liveliest feel- 
ings of confidence in the bright prospects it holds. 
The past year has been a good one for us and the out- 
look for a continuation of the prosperity we have been 
enjoying is bright. 

We attribute the splendid progress we have made 
to the hearty co-operation of our agents. We want to 
thank you for what you have done for us ; we shall 
strive constantly to be more worthy of your good-will. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 




PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 



CLEVELAND, 
CHICAGO, 
NEW YORK, 



NEWARK, 
BOSTON, 
KANSAS CITY, 

CANADIAN D 

ME»DOU«RTEBt, & PAINT FACTORY, 

21 St. Antoine Street, Montreal. 

VARNISH FACTORY, 

St. Patrick Street. Montreal. 



SAN FRANCISCO, 
LOS ANGELES, 
MINNEAPOLIS. 



MONTREAL, 

TORONTO, 

WINNIPEG. 



VISION 

TORONTO DEPOT. 

86 York Street. 

WINNIPEG DEPOT, 



147 Bannatyne St., East. 



firmly secured to it by nnts on both the 
inside and outside of the terminal 
boards. The connections led through 
the frame of the machine are insulated 
completely from it by mica tubes. A 
feature of the frames is that they are 
split horizontally and reinforced at the 
division point in order to prevent un- 
balancing of the magnetic lines of force. 

Another noticeable feature of their ' 
machines are the brush holders. The 
elimination of defective features and 
the perfecting of desirable points are 
the result of years of experience in de- 
signing and use, and they claim that 
they are the best carbon brushes in use 
at the present time. Each individual 
brush is adjustable for spacing on the 
commutator, and no special tools are re- 
quired for this adjustment. No current 
is carried, through the springs or slid- 
ing contact, and a stop is provided to 
prevent the brass portion of the holder 



from striking the commutator when the 
brush is removed. 

The Goudey-McLean dust and water- 
proof motors for use in flour mills, 
mines, foundries or other dusty or 
damp locations are a little out of the 
ordinary. The enclosing covers are 
made of heavy sheet metal formed over 
clutches. They fit the frame closely 
and completely cover the commutator 
fearing, and being fitted with rubber 
packing in contact with the shaft on 
the pulley end, effectively exclude all 
dust and moisture. With the cover con- 
struction of sheet metal the machine 
runs much cooler than those equipped 
with thick cast iron covers. 

They have another covering for ma- 
chines intended not to exclude dust or 
moisture, but for a protection against 
flying pieces of metal coming in con- 
tact with the armature. These covers 
are perforated with ventilating holes. 
Motors thus protected are specially 
adapted for attachment to lathes, plan- 
ers and other machine shop tools. 



17 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



SAVAGE ARMS CATALOGUE, 

One of the most fascinating calendars 
of t lie year is a poster art calendar issu- 
ed by the Savage Arms Co., Ctiea, N.Y. 
The scene portrayed by the artist, C. 
Rungius, is rarely interesting. In a 
hilly country a huntsman, with his Sav- 
age rifle in hand, stands over a fine buck 
which he has brought to earth. Stand- 
ing nearby as if trained thoroughly to 
the sport, is the hunter's horse. The 
entire scene would be an ornament any- 
where. This catalogue is too valuable 
for promiscuous delivery, so readers of 
this paper should mention-" Hardware,! 
and Metal " when asking for a copy, 
sending 10c. with request. 

THE B. GREENING WIRE CO. 

The calendar issued by the B. Green- 
ing Wire Co., Hamilton, is, like those 
issued in former years, of practical ser- 
vice. The pad is of large size and the 
letters so distinct .that they could easily 
be read across a room. On the back of 
the pad are several weights and measures 
tables of distinct value to users of wire, 
bar iron, iron and steel. Readers of 
' ' Hardware and Metal ' ' can have this 
calendar on application. 

TORONTO. 

II. S. Howland, Sons & Co., Toronto, 
are distributing a dainty little booklet, 
showing many handsome photographs of 
leading public buildings, water front, 
street and park scenes. One of the 
scenes shown is an exterior view of the 
wholesale warehouse of H. S. Howland, 
Sons & Co., Front street, Toronto. 

"WINTER SPORTS " CATALOGUE. 

R. & W. Kerr, St. Catherine street, 
Hamilton, have ready for distribution 
their " Winter Sports " catalogue. 
Among the lines covered in the 124-page 
book are skates, hockey supplies, skis, 
showshoes, toboggans, sweaters, and 
other woollen goods, sleighs, exercises, 
gymnasium supplies, parlor games, play- 
ing cards, electric lamps, pocket cutlery, 
brass kettles, etc. This catalogue should 
be useful to hardware dealers in all parts 
for reference, particularly as R. & W. 
Kerr bear an enviable reputation for 
progressiveness and straight dealing. 

A retailer's CALENDAR. 
" Gilpin's Hardware Store," is a fea- 
ture of the calendar issued by i lie Orillia, 
Ont., Packet, this year. The local paper 
prepared the calendar and used most of 




AUTOMATIC 




Have the 
Largest Sale 
of any Re- 
volver in the World. 



WHY ? 

1st. Because they are absolutely safe ; accidental discharge 
is impossible, and others are not. 

2nd. Because they possess an intrinsic value not to be found 
in any other make. 

3rd. Because they are the best advertised, and being the 
best advertised are the best known, and most demanded, etc. 

Many other reasons could be stated, but we are prevented 
for lack of space; but send for our FIRE ARMS Catalog, it telle 
the whole story. 



Automatic 
Hammerless. 



IVER JOHNSONS ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 

New York Office, No. 99 Chambers St. FITCHBURG, MASS. 



the advertising space itself, but the 
valuable space on the first and last line 
of the date pad was secured by " Gil- 
pin's Hardware Store," and used to 
good effect. The idea was an excellent 
one. 

OFFICE FIXTURES. 

The George B. Meadows Wire, 
Iron and Brass Company, Toronto, 
are sending out seasonable greet- 
ings, the feature of which is an in- 
teresting view of bank fixtures "made 
in Canada " by that company. The fix- 
trures are both artistic and practical and 
are a credit to their makers. 

SHEET METAL BUILDING GOODS. 

The Metal Shingle and Siding Co., 
Preston, Out., have issued a neat hook- 
let descriptive of the sheet metal build- 
ing materials made by them. A wide 
variety of metal roofing, shingles, Span- 
ish tile, corrugated sheets, metal sidings, 
metal building fronts, galvanized sky- 
lights, fanes- metal ceilings, cornices, 
ventilators and ornaments. The booklet 
will be sent to the trade on request. 

18 



TRAVELLERS' MUTUAL BENEFIT. 

THE Commercial Travellers' Mutual 
Benefit Society met in the Y.M.C.A. 
parlors, Toronto, Saturday night, 
week, to nominate the officers for the com- 
ing year. The elections will take place on 
January 23. President George Anderson 
was in the chair. The reports show that 
this has been one of the most successful 
years of the society. 

The following were nominated : 

President, S. K. Wickett, E. Fielding. 

Vice-President, Joseph Taylor, R. R. 
Davis. 

The following were re-elected : 

Treasurer, J. A. Ross. 

Trustees, Toronto, H. E. Bond, Robert 
Maxwell, G. E. A. Bradshaw, George H. 
Haslem, F. J. Zammers ; Hamilton, E. 
A. Daly, J. Hooper; Montreal, G. L. 
Shorey, W. E. Ramsay ; Kingston, Bf, S. 
Sutherland, J. F. Baker; London, J. M. 
Dillon, W. H. Escott ; Winnipeg, Hyman 
Miller, C. C. McGlashan ; Brantford, J. 
P. Morrison, J. W. Harris ; Berlin, C. 
Huenn, J. Knuff ; Guelph, II. P. Molden. 

The following new branches were open- 
ed : Barrie, R. M. Butler ; Peterboro, A. 
G. Dickson ; Chatham, F. C. Stegman. 

It was decided that the Toronto trus- 
tees might appoint trustees for Windsor, 
St. Catharines, Stratford, Ottawa, and 
St. Thomas. 





HENRY BVf<£B 5 __ jRiJYAL HOCKEY 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 

LIMITED 

wh §^l? ale 37-39 West Front Street, Toronto. whSuesale 

IN STOCK TO-DAY 

SPRING SKATES. 

£7 No. ' List Price. 
) 5 Polished $0.74 pair 

jPlllig^fi'lil 1 I!; :'!!! l||,! !»'# fSiWil''' 111 lll 2*^ y All sizes, 7 to 12%-in. 

Nos. 5, 9. J0 Sizes 9, 9% and 12-in. 

<¥?•''' LADIES' SKATES. 

No. 

415 Ordinary Quality $1.08 " 

A Sizes 8, 8%-in. 

£ 1422 Best Quality, Plated 2.36 " 

Sizes 8%, 9-in. 

1424 Concave Blades, Plated 2.84 " 

No. 1422. 8izes8, 8%, 9, 9%, 10%, 11%-in. 

*7 XT HOCKEV SKATES. 

/ No. 

530% Ordinary Quality $0.50 " 

All sizes, 7% to 12-in. 

515 Ordinary Quality, Plated 1.08 " 

Size 12-in. 

531 Best Quality, Blued Tops 1.70 " 

Sizes 8%, 9, 9%, 10, 10%, 11, 11%-in. 

532 Best Quality, Plated 2.30 " 

Nos. 531, 532. sizes g ^ 9) 9 ^_ n _. n _ 

~A 

No. 

631 Best Quality, Blued Tops $1 80 "■ 

Sizes 10, 10%, 11, 11%-in. 

632 Best Quality, Plated 2.46 " 

8izes 10, 11, 11%-in. 

634 Concaved Blades, Plated 2.96 " 

Sizes 9, 9%, 10%, 11%-in. 
Nos. 631, 632. ') 

No. 

692 Plain Blades, Plated $3.30 " 

Sizes 10%, 11%, 12-in. 

694 Concaved Blades, Plated 4.00 " 

Sizes 9, 9%, 10, 10%, 11, 11%-in. 

9537 "Lightning," Plated $5.80 

Sizes, 9%, 10%, 11, 11%, 12-in. 

No. 9537. 
LIST PRICES SUBJECT TO SATISFACTORY TRADE DISCOUNT. 

H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. u Wn .. Toronto. 

OUR prices are right GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST. WE ship promptly 

Faotory : Duftorln Stroot, Toronto 
19 






Hardware and 
Metal 



MACHINERY 




it 



THE PEERLESS" 



jS the best Bolster Spring ever produced. A fine 
line for the hardware trade. - Write Ub for Prices 



Kay Electric Dynamo and Motor Co., Limited 

Manufacturers of Dynamos and Motors for all pur- 
poses, both direct and alternating currents. Special 
attention given to repairs. 

Office and Works, 219-221 Queen St. East, Toronto. 

'Phone Main 1251. Estimates cheerfully given. 




JAMES WARNOCK & CO., 



GALT, ONT. 




WE STRAP THE WORLD! 



Cary's Universal Box Strap 



A 



MADE IN FOUR WIDTHS. 
y % inch, % inch, % inch and 1 inch. 
PATENTED IN ALL COUNTRIES. 



CONTINUOUS Metal Strap with a series of raised bosses along- the edges, to 
strengthen same and protect nail heads. Put up in coils of 300 feet each, and 
packed 20 coils in a case. On each coil we put our patent metal reel frame, making 
it a complete reel. 

Montreal E F DARTNELL, 180 St. James St. 

HEADQUARTERS : bbll TEIjE p HONE MAIN No . 2382 . 



FAIRBANKS 



Renewable 
Asbestos Disc 



VALVES 




THE BEST VALVES THAT MONEY AND SKILL CAN PRODUCE 



You are Cheating Yourself 

if you have not inquired into the merits 
of Fairbanks Valves, because if you want the Best, and 
think you have the best when you are using some other 
make of valves than "Fairbanks" you are laboring 
under a false impression. 

When you buy Fairbanks Valves 
you Know you Have the BEST. 



Their many points of superiority have been fully 
demonstrated by the severe test of actual service, and for this reason Fairbanks 
Valves are specified by the leading architects and engineers everywhere. 

SEND FOR VALVE CATALOGUE. 

IRBANKS COMPANY 




MONTREAL. 



TORONTO. 



WINNIPEG. 



VANCOUVER. 



Hard-ware and 
Metal 




The Machinery Markets. 

TORONTO. 

ANEW year has been entered 
upon. The last two weeks 
of the old year, in most trades 
the brightest and most busi- 
ness like of all the year, but 
with machinery dealers usually the dull- 
est, have been bridged over. Although 
the past two weeks may not have been 
quite so bright as those preceeding. still 
they were very far from being dull 
weeks on the Toronto .machinery market. 
As was noted in last issue there was a 
slight depression during Christmas week 
and even the week before, and this has 
continued during the New Year's week. 
This depression did not, however, con- 
stitute a dull market, since it was only 
a slight falling off from a good market. 
The machinery dealers are unanimous 
in declaring the past year one of the 
best they have experienced. The North- 
west and New Ontario have made large 
demands in the line of machinery of all 
kinds, and in no other year has so much 
machinery been shipped to British Col- 
umbia, our Prairie land and New On- 
tario. Nor have the older and better 
populated districts of Canada been be- 
hind hand in their wants. The year 
1903 has been a prosperous one for Can- 
ada and her industries have been forg- 
ing ahead rapidly. Consequently many 
new plants have been built and the ca- 
pacity of many others has been increas- 
ed. Thus there has been a continual de- 
man for manufacturing machinery and 
for power producing and power trans- 
mitting machinery. The use of electric 
motors for the running of individual ma- 
chines has become quite general during 
the past year, the transmission of power 
through wires and the application of it 
to the machine by the motor proving of 
much more convenient than by shafting 
and belting. Wood-working machinery, 
engines and boilers have constituted to 
a large extent the shipments of machin- 
ery to New Ontario, although consider- 
able machinery for machine shop equip- 
ment has also been shipped. The North- 
west has taken a large number of en- 
gines and boilers. The good times has 
not been limited to large machinery 



manufacturers and dealers, but has made 
itself felt among the machinists and die 
makers. The entire year has been a cood 
one for them, but especially has the last 
three or four months been busy ones. 
The more machinery there is in use the 
greater is the number of repairs neces- 
sary. So the machinists have also reap- 
ed the benefit of Canada's industrial 
growth during the past year. The ma- 
chinists in Toronto have been so busy 
that some of them have been lead to 
say that too much business causes as 
much worry as too little. Still most 
people would sooner be troubled with 
"too much" than with "too little." 
The year 1903 has been a splendid one 
for machinery manufacturers, dealers 
and repairers: What will the coming 
year be? Machinery men do not pre- 
tend to read the future, but they say 
that there is every promise at the pres- 
ent time for a busy new year. It is ex- 
pected that the present slight depression 
will not continue longer than the middle 
of January. Of course there are the 
pessimistic ones who say that, although 
business is good at the present time and 
for the most part the prospects are good. 
there is no telling when a reaction may 
set in. However, there is generally a 
reason for any such reaction and as 
there is no reason now for one to be 
feared it may be left out of considera- 
tion. So far the Toronto market has not 
been affected to any great extent by the 
slackness in the States, and trade con- 
ditions are reported to be brightening 
up there. 

The H. W. Petrie Machinery Co. re- 
port business much the same as last 
week. It is brisk, but of course not so 
much so as three or four weeks ago. 
They are, however, quite satisfied with 
the business done during the past two 
weeks, and look forward to an increase 
in orders about the middle of January. 
Prospective buyers are withholding or- 
ders until later on in the month. Pros- 
pects are good, however, and everything 
promises well for the year just entered 
upon. 

The A. R. Williams Machinery Co. 
report orders coming in much more 
21 



readily than is to be expected about; the 
time of the departure of the old and the 
advent of the new year. The prospects 
for a bright market during the months 
to come are good, but there is no say- 
ing what will happen until after it has 
happened, and it cannot be said with 
any assurance what the condition of the 
market will he two weeks from to-day 
until that time has arrived. They say 
that they have not noticed any change 
on the market during the past week. 

The hevy, Weston & Mchean Machin- 
ery Co. say that business with them dur- 
ing the past week has been good, and 
that things are much the same as last 
week. They are finding a good sale for 
engines and boilers, and also for wood- 
working machinery. The outlook for 
good times in the industries of Canada 
is bright, and consequently the outlook 
for the machinery dealers is good. 

W. H. Banfield & Son, machinists and 
die makers, think that there is every 
prospect for a good year. They have 
been very busy during the past week. 

The Dominion Motor Machine Co. re- 
port business good, and are looking for- 
ward to a prosperous year to come. They 
are going more deeply into the manfac- 
ture of automobiles; and they are also 
putting on the market a neat gasoline 
engine for a motive power on farms. 

The Jones & Moore Electric Co. ex- 
pect that during the coming year the 
bright feeling that has characterized 
the market for electrical machinery for 
some time past will continue. At the 
present time business is good. 

MONTREAL. 

There is a general feeling of appre- 
hension among Montreal machinery 
houses lest American competition may 
lead to extensive price cutting in Can- 
ada. This would have a demoralizing 
effect on business here. Could this price 
cutting game be avoided, there is no rea- 
son why machinery men should not find 
1904 an even more prosperous year than 
1903 has been. Naturally, trade is quiet 
this week but that is only to be expected 
at this time of year. Inquiries are com- 
ing in freely from all parts of the coun- 
try and prospects are bright for a large 



Hardware and 
Metal 



MACHINERY 



trade. Whether or not this trade will be 
profitable depends entirely on the course 
of action followed by United States 
machinery houses. At all events it is 
gratifying to find that while the market 
in the United States is dull, conditions 
in Canada are considered so satisfactory. 
Eliminate ' ' dumping ' ' by American 
houses and trade conditions in Canada 
will continue satisfactory. Alarm is 
expressed in some quarters owing to the 
failure of one large firm and the serious 
embarrassments of another, but on the 
whole there would be no serious fears 
for the future if the danger of "dump- 
ing" were removed. 

The Laurie Engine Company report 
business in December, 1903, much bet- 
ter than in any previous December. A 
number of contracts are now being ex- 
ecuted for engines of very large horse- 
power and orders for small engines are 
very numerous. Business in machine 
tools is considered very fair. A large 
machine shop in Thetford Mines has 
been fitted out by the Laurie Engine Co. 
Wood-working machinery has been sell- 
ing well. The general outlook would be 
very satisfactory indeed were it not for 
the fear of severe price cutting by 
United States houses. There is no doubt 
that the demand for all kinds of ma- 
chinery will be very good and unless 
price cutting is severe the Canadian 
trade will continue statisfactory. 

Mr. Alfred Rubra, of the Machinery 
Exchange, reports business quiet this 
week, but as he says, no one expects 
much activity at this season. He does 
not handle machinery supplies, but for 
these he thinks there should be consider- 
able demand. Numerous inquiries are 
coming in although actual business is 
small; the general outlook is considered 
quite satisfactory unless American com- 
petition should cause a slump in prices. 
American houses are now offering spe- 
cial inducements in order to capture our 
markets. A year or two ago when busi- 
ness in the United States was brisker 
than it is just now American machinery 
houses were not very obliging. They 
would not accept consigned orders. 
They accept these now without ques- 
tion and are offering special price in- 
ducements besides. Mr. Rubra has him- 
self accepted a new American agency 
because of special prices being offered. 
Whether or not price cutting will be 
very pronounced it is difficult to say. 

AVilliams & Wilson state that at pres- 
ent they are waiting to see which way 
the cat will jump. They are not sure 
that the pendulum is not about to swing 



the other way and if so Canada has al- 
ready reached the height of her pros- 
perity. Business is quiet just now, but 
that is only to be expected. Inquiries 
for future delivery are not so numerous 
as might be expected, showing that some 
buyers are holding off expecting a slump 
in prices. Business for 1903 has been 
exceptionally good ; what 1904 will bring 
it is difficult to predict. 

W. H. Nolan, of the Canada Machin- 
ery Agency, reports prospects quite 
bright. Inquiries are coming in satis- 
factorily and unless something unex- 
pected should happen he expects an- 
other very prosperous year. Business 
this week is quiet, as it is to be expected. 

Machinery and Electrical Notes. ' 

The Moose Jaw Machine Works have 
been completely destroyed by fire. The 
Joss is estimated at $5,000, which is par- 
tially covered by insurance. 

The Laurie Engine Company are build- 
ing a 400 horse-power steam plant for 
the Crown Grain Company, of Winnipeg. 
The plant includes engines, boilers, con- 
densers, etc., and is in every respect up- 
to-date. 

The Laurie Engine Company, Mont- 
real, have just completed the erection of 
a 600 horse-power Vertical cross com- 
pound engine for direct connection to 
electric generators for the Winnipeg 
street railway. 

The Laurie Engine Company, Mont- 
real, are busy now with some large con- 
tracts. They have just shipped a large 
cross compound engine for direct con- 
nection to electric generators to the St. 
John, N.B., Street Railway Company. 

The Laurie Engine Company, Mont- 
real, are now building two 1,600 horse- 
power cross compound engines for the 
Toronto Street Railway Company. These 
are now almost completed and the com- 
pany are preparing to build a similar 
engine for the Winnipeg Street Railway 
Company. 

A despatch from Fort William, Out., 
says that it is probable that a large 
boiler works will be established at that 
place by an American company. The 
conditions under which the company 
will install the plant have been stipulat- 
ed and are under consideration by a 
committee appointed by the civic coun- 
cil. Many are anxious to secure the 
plant on account of work that will be 
provided during the months when navi- 
gation is closed in the overhauling and 
repairing of boats that may be done at 
the plant. 

22 



J. J. Albright, one of the principal 
stockholders of the Niagara and Ontario 
Power Company, of Niagara Falls, Ont.. 
says that the building of the plant is 
progressing favorably. The dynamos 
and other machinery are being con- 
structed by the Westinghouse Company, 
and it is expected that the installation 
will be commenced in the Spring. He 
also says that contrary to the supposi- 
tion of many, F. V. Greene, of New York, 
has been appointed general manager of 
the company and will not be engineer. 
He says that no change will be made in 
the engineering staff. 

A despatch from London, England, 
says that the Financier and Bullionist 
comments upon the announcement that 
an order for locomotives for the Can- 
adian Pacific Railway had been placed 
with a German firm by saying that some 
time ago the C.P.R. decided to order a 
certain type of locomotive, specifications 
of which they had prepared. The Glas- 
gow firm which generally fills the orders 
of the company was too busy to bind 
themselves to deliver the locomotives 
within the time specified. Other British 
firms able to fill the order were in the 
same position, and thus the order was 
given to a German firm. 

The Laurie Engine Company have in- 
stalled a number of small engines rang- 
ing from 75 to 800 horse-power in differ- 
ent parts of the country during the past 
two months. They are making 'a speci- 
alty of their " Rival " engine which is 
made in different horse-powers ranging 
from 5 to 100. They do not claim that 
these engines are economical, for no en- 
gine of such small horse-power can be, 
but they do claim that it is as economical 
as an engine of that horse-power can be 
made. During the last two months they 
have sold seven of these engines to the 
C.P.R. and that company are known to 
be connoisseurs of engines and machin- 
ery of all kinds. These engines will work 
with compressed air as well as with 
steam. They are compact, the frame be- 
ing all one piece, and they require only 
one foundation. There is nothing about 
them to get out of order as they are ex- 
tremely simple in construction. 

The Carriage Makers' Machinery. 

THK progress of recent years in 
blacksmithing and carriage mak- 
ing is manifested by the following 
suggestions in Backsmith and Wheel- 
wright : The old-fashioned carriage 
shop, dingy with age, black inside and 
out, with broken down wagons and farm 
machines and other rubbish laying all 



MACHINERY 



Hard-ware and 
Metal 



Bread, Milk and Trade Checks 

Made of BRASSor ALUMINUM. 

SEND FOR PRICES. 

STENCILS, STEEL STAMPS,. 
RUBBER STAMPS, Etc. 



Hamilton Stamp & Stencil Works, 

HAMILTON, ONT. 

BUY 

KERR 

VALVES. 

They give 
satisfaction 
every time, 

Catalogue 
on application. 




The Kerr Engine Go. 

LIMITED 

Walkervllle, Ont. 




Blacksmiths' 



Drills. 

The very 
best. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 



"Say, Friend," 

your aim should be to start up for yourself. 

Why Work 

from morn till night for somebody else instead of 
pushing a business for yourself and thus reap the full 
profit of your labor ? 

We Will 

start men of ability and good character in every 
County in the Dominion. 



WRITE FOR PARTICULARS TO 



The Empire Machine and Metal Stamping Co. 

1012 Yonge St. - TORONTO, 

Canadian Metal for Canadians. 

IMPERIAL BABBITT. — Perfect antifriction, no matter what the speed or the 
crushing weight. Satisfactory wherever and whenever used. Why experiment with new 
and foreign-made metals, when a Canada-made, thoroughly tried and absolutely reliable 
metal is at your command ? 



THE CANADA METAL CO., s7£i£ TORONTO 



CAP SCREWS. SET SCREWS. 

Square and Hexagon 




COLD PRESSED NUTS 



FINISHED. 



SEMI-FINISHED. 



Canada Foundry Company, 

LIMITED. 

Head Office, TORONTO, ONT. 

District Offices — Montreal, Halifax, Ottawa, Winnipeg 
Vancouver, Victoria, Rossland. 




u 



Syracuse Babbit Metal 



IT IS THE BEST MADE. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig 
Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, 
Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc 
Spelter, Phosphor Bronze, Nickel, etc.. 
always in stock. 



Canadian Works, Montreal, P.Q. 

American Works, Syracuse, N.Y. . 

Head Office American Works, 94 Oold St.. New York. 



./\_ 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

PHOSPHOR TIN.PHOSPHOR BRONZE 

"j BRASS INGOTS NEEOLE METAL. TYPE 

viETAlS ITC..BAR. WIRE. PLUMBERS 

A-aTlNNERS SOLDERS, a«o all 

WHITE METAL MIXTURES. 



7 



Istracuse snf uino * muss 
BABBITT r-lETAL. | 



T IMPORTERS AMD DEALERS IN 

I pia tin. pig lead, ingot coppl-r 

I SPELTER. ALUMINUM ANTIMONY, 
NICKEL, BISMUTM 



For 

Paper and Pulp Mills, 

Saw and Wood-Working Machinery, 

Cotton and Silk Mills, 

Dynamos, Marine Engines, 

and all kinds of 

Machinery Bearings. 



SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS 



23 



Hardware ano. 
Metal 



MACHINERY 



around it, and with everything at loose 
ends inside, is fast passing' away. Its 
place is being taken by neat shops in- 
side and out. New tools and improved 
machines are being substituted for old- 
fashioned methods of doing work. The 
blacksmith is taking an up-to-date po- 
sition in the mechanical world. 

Have' you put in a gasoline engine 
yet ? If not, why not ? Why work your- 
self to death when you can use power to 
do a large proportion of the work now 
done by muscle? With an engine you 
can run a variety of machinery, includ- 
ing a trip hammer, circular saw, grind- 
stone, drills and may other machines, 
and, having got started, you will be sure 



26th of July, 1779. He learned the trade 
of goldsmith, and in 1824, in his native 
town, made the first Britannia ware pro- 
duced in the United States, but this en- 
terprise proved unsuccessful. He then 
removed to Boston and entered the em- 
ploy of the South Boston Iron Works, 
and in 1839, while an employe of this es- 
stablishment, he produced the invention 
which has perpetuated his name. For 
this invention he was given a gold medal 
from the Massachusetts Charitable Me- 
chanics' Association, and afterward 
Congress granted him the sum of $20,- 
000 as a reward. In 1844 the invention 
was patented in England and in 1847 in 
Russia. After devoting' some time to 




Montreal Works of Canadian General Electric Co. 

Bliowing Interior cf Main Machine Shop, comprising upwards of 65,000 Square Feet of FloorlSpaee, 
devoted to the Manufacture of High-Class Electrical Machinery' 



to add to these from time to time. A 
blacksmith shop provided with an engine 
and some modern tools and machines will 
draw trade from a long distance. 

History of Babbitt Metal. 

AN erroneous idea appears to pre- 
vail in regard to the invention of 
Babbitt metal, says the Metal In- 
dustry. Although Isaac Babbitt was the 
inventor of the method of using soft 
metals in journal boxes, his patent spe- 
cification makes no claim on the alloy 
itself, but simply on the method of hold- 
ing the soft metal in place. Isaac Bab- 
bitt was born in Taunton, Mass., on the 



the production of metals he engaged in 
the manufacture of soap, so that his 
name has become almost a household 
word. He died insane at the McLean 
asylum, Somerville, Mass., May '26, 1862. 
The fact that in the patent specification 
no claim is made for the alloy is suffi- 
cient to dispel the ordinary belief in this 
direction. Britannia metal, pewter or 
an alloy of tin, 50 parts; antimony, 5 
parts, and copper 1 part are recommend- 
ed. The latter alloy is somewhat softer 
than that now known as "genuine Bab- 
bitt," which is commonly composed of 
tin, 96 parts; antimony, 8 parts; and 
copper, 4 parts. The original idea in the 
24 



use of a soft metal was practically the 
same as it is now— i.e., to make a bear- 
ing which would conform to the surface 
of the axle. It is natural, then, that the 
alloys used to-day are somewhat harder 
than the original material employed. It 
is also natural that the same Isaac Bab- 
bitt should have been handed down to 
posterity as the inventor of the alloy, 
although, of course, quite erroneously. 

A Business Transfer. 

The Smith & Hemenway Company, of 
New York, have completed arrange- 
ments with the Page-Storms Drop Forge 
Company whereby they have secured the 
entire marketing of this, company's 
engineers' wrenches. The New York 
office of the Page-Stevens Drop Forge 
Company is now at 296 Broadway, care 
of the Smith & Hemenway Company, 
who will lo*)k after this end of their 
business exclusively. 

In addition to their manufacture of 
drop forged engineers' wrenches, they 
pay particular attention to the making 
of forgings from blue prints or samples, 
for anyone desiring their class of work. 
Parties interested or wishing to have 
forgings made might make their requests 
known direct to the Page-Storms Drop 
Forge Company's factory at Bright- 
wood, Mass. 



T 



Shipping of Canada. 

HE total number of new vessels 
built in the Dominion of Canada 
during the last fiscal year has 
been announced as aggregating 30,2 Ui 
tons. This includes 70 vessels of 8,928 
tons, built in the inland Provinces for 
lake and river use. Added to the ship- 
ping upon the Canadian registry books 
at the end of the previous year this gives 
a total of 7,013 vessels, aggregating 
696,492 tons, or approximately 7,000 
vessels averaging 100 tons each. The 
fact, however, that a good many Cana- 
dian vessels were, as usual, sold to other 
countries during the year, besides sev- 
eral being lost, probably left the bal- 
ance lower at the end of the year than 
at the end of the previous year, which 
condition is quite in line with the trend 
of events for a generation past. The 
vessels on Canadian registry in 1898 
numbered 6,427 of 690,525 tons; in 1896, 
7,262 vessels of 825,837 tons; in 1892, 
7,011 of 964,351 tons; in 1883, 7,374 of 
1,267,394 tons; in 1873, 6,783 of 1,073,- 
718 tons. The fact that only four coun- 
tries to-day own shipping to a volume 
of more than 1,000,000 tons shows that 
the Canadian fiffures are not immater- 



MACHINERY 



Hardwtra »nd 



ial. Nova Scotia, owing to her exten- 
sive coastwise ami fishing trade, con- 
tinues to lead the other Provinces in 
vessel ownership, the number on her 
registry books December 31 last being 
2,037 vessels of 212,967 tons, compared 
with 1,699 of 156,449 tons for Ontario; 
1,28S of 137,660 tons for Quebec, and 
917 of 64,605 tons for New Brunswick. 
— Marine Review. 

Fairbanks' Travellers Meet. 

The Fairbanks Co. held a meeting of 
their travellers during the first four days 
of the week at their Canadian head 
quarters in Montreal. Their travelling 
representatives and heads of departments 
from their Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
and Vancouver houses were present. The 
machinery salesman requires to know his 
goods and the object of the convention 
is to keep the salesmen in touch with all 
the latest improvements. The superin- 
tendents and experts connected with the 
various factories attended the convention 
and were at great pains to familiarize 
their men thoroughly with the various 
lines of goods handled. A pleasant fea- 
ture of the occasion was a dinner given 
at the Engineers' Club on Tuesday even- 
ing by the manager. Mr. Henry J. Fuller. 

MADE IN CANADA 




Stitched Cotton 
Duck Belting 

Superior to all others. 

FOR 

Agricultural Machines, Elevators, 
Pulp and Paper Mills, Cotton, Woollen, 
Cement and Saw Mills, Machine Shops 
and Electric Powers. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Dominion Belting Company 

Limited 

MAHILTON, CANADA. 

USE OUR 

"MAPLE LEAF BELT DRESSING" 



American Sheet & Tin Plate Co. 

THE American Sheet Steel Company 
and the American Tin Plate 
Company will be consolidated 
the first Of the year under the 
Dame of the American Sheet & Tin Plate 
Co. The present offices in New York of 
both companies will be abolished as soon 
after January 1 as possible and will be 
removed to Pittsburg. Offices for the 
combined companies have already been 
secured in the Frick building, and when 
the sales and executive departments 
have been removed from New York, the 
operating and local sales departments 
of both companies will be removed from 
the Vandergrift and Carnegie buildings 
respectively to the Frick building. Geo. 
(I. McMurtry, president of the Ameri- 
can Sheet Steel Co., has been elected 
chairman of the board of directors of 
the new company and W. T. Graham, 
president of the American Tin Plate Co. 
will be president. W. M. Leeds, of the 
American Tin Plate Co., has been elect- 
ed first vice-president and E. W. Parg- 
ny, of the American Sheet Steel Co., has 
been elected second vice-president. H. 
B. Wheeler will be secretary and treas- 
urer. By this consolidation operating 
expenses can be reduced very materially 



both in sales and operating forces, as 
well as in the executive department. 

W. M. Leeds, who becomes first vice- 
president, has been head of the tin plate 
operating department. Mr. Pargny has 
been manager of the sheet mills in the 
Kiskiminetas valley, which are the larg- 
est and most important of the American 
Sheet Steel Co. H. B. Wheeler is a 
brother of Frederick S. Wheeler, who 
was prominent in the formation of the 
American Tin Plate Co., and treasurer 
until he became associated with the 
American Can Co. — Iron Trade Review. 

Now Have Canadian Warehouse. 

Smith & Hemenway Co., New York, 
have found their Canadian business 
growing so rapidly that they have found 
it desirable to open an office and sam- 
ple room at Room 215 Coristine Build- 
ing, Montreal. Applications for quota- 
tions, etc., should hereafter be sent to 
that address. 

Allen C. Jenking will have charge of 
the new office and Mr. Smith, who form- 
erly represented the firm in Canada, 
will now cover territory in the .United 
States. Mr. Jenking will be pleased to 
welcome any of the trade desiring to 
examine the samples of cutlery and 
hardware specialties shown by the 
Smith & Hemenwav Co. 




REGISTERED 1(1 



TSAOE.MARK 



Craig Nine 
Crystal Corundum 

NOT ADULTERATED WITH EMERY. 

Has an effective hardness of 9. as compared with 10. of 
the diamond. Wheels made from it do from two to five 
times the work of emery wheels. Why ? CRAIG MINE 
CRYSTAL CORUNDUM has 95 per cent, to 98 per cent, 
compared with emery's 30 per cent, to 40 per cent, of 
crystalline alumina — the only part of emery that cuts. 

Emery rubs and burns. Craig Mine Crystal Corundum 
cuts fast and cold. Our booklet will explain. 



The Canada Corundum Company, n* 



TORONTO, CANADA. 



ii/nx/rr/ini; stiyis /Tic M f\L, 



8 "Dominion Brand" Tarred Felt. 



THE BEST THAT MONEY CAN BUY. 



" Shield Brand " Ready Roofing, 2 and 3-ply. 



■QUICK SELLERS.' 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY- 



Lockerby & McComb, 65 Shannon St., Montreal 

Bell Telephone Main 1989. 

=DO IT NOW=~ 



Buy 

True 
Brand 




Fencing 
Plyers 



BEST GOODS 



RIGHT PRICES 



E. F. WALTER & CO., S3A, Montreal 

"Samson" Milk Can Trimmings. 



Strongest, neatest, most sanitary 
and only one-piece bottom made. 

Has no seams or rivets to cor- 
rode and collect dirt. 



Every bottom in each size is of an 
exact diameter. Being stamped out with 
a die — not spun — there can be no variation as in 
a bottom made in several pieces. 

Requires less solder and work in putting 
together than pieced bottoms — also wears longer. 




Section of "Samson" Milk Can Bottom. 



The McClary Manufacturing Co. 

London, Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver, St. John, N.B. 

"EVERYTHING FOR THE TINSHOP." 

86 




PATENTED.JULY. 23, 1900 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



President : 

JOHN BAYNB MACLEAN. 

Montreal. 

rhe MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

OFFICES. 

Montreal - 



Toronto 
London, Eng. 
Manchester, Eno. 
St. John, N.B. - 



- 232 McGill Street. 
Telephone Main 1255. 
10 Front Street East. 
Telephone Main 2701. 
109 Fleet Street, E.C. 
J. Meredith McKim. 
92 Market Street. 
H. S. Ashburner. 
No. 3 Market Wharf. 
J. Hunter White. 
New York Room 1241 New York Life Bldg. 

W. T. Robson. 
Winnipeg, Man. - Room 308, Mclntyre Block. 

Telephone 1846. 

E. C. Hind. 

L P. Luxton. 

Vancouver, B.C. - - Geo. S. B.' Perry. 

Subscription, Canada and United States, 82.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s 

Published every Saturday. 

Cable Address \ Adscri P l > London. 
Cable Addre,s j Adscript> Canada. 



VALUES IN THE HARDWARE 
TRADE. 

THE recent reduction of 10 per 
cent in barn door hangers and 
tracks and 20 per cent, in spring- hinges 
was directly due to the competition of 
the United States manufacturers who 
have recently been attempting to gain 
possession of the Canadian market in 
these lines. 

It is not thought probable that there 
will, at anv rate in the near future, be 
any important reductions in the price 
of hardware manufactured in Canada. 
It has been pointed out to " Hardware 
and Metal,*' and with some reason, 
that before this can be accomplished 
there must be a reduction in wages, 
which in the present condition of the 
labor market is not thought likely. 
During the past year the advance in 
wanes among the manufacturers of hard- 
ware lines has been about 171-2 per 
cent. As wages is the most important 
item entering into the cost of the 
manufactured hardware, it is evident 
that those who hold that prices are 
likely, as a rule, to be maintained are 
fairlv accurate in their conclusions. 

But the cost of labor is not the only 



EDITORIAL 

item which tends to maintain prices in 
finished hardware ■ lines. Values in 
malleable iron, brass, and steel are be- 
iiiii well maintained and not only are 
they being well maintained, but it is 
still difficult to get orders filled. 

CANADA AS A DUMPING GROUND 
FOR IRON AND STEEL. 

A TTENTION has again been drawn 
l~\ to the iron and steel imports into 
Canada by the deputation which waited 
upon the Minister of Finance on De- 
cember 28th. This deputation claimed 
that the ironmasters in the United 
States were selling steel rails, and other 
products of iron and steel, in Canada 
at prices that are from 20 to 25 per 
cent, less than are exacted in their home 
market. It was claimed that steel bil- 
lets, are being offered as low as $20 per 
ton, whereas a year ago or less Can- 
adian manufacturers were asking and 
getting all the way from $24 to $26 per 
ton for pig iron. 

The question raised by the deputa- 
tion is an important one. Looked at 
only from the standpoint of the people 
who purchase the imported iron and 
steel at the low figures named, it is no 
doubt an advantage to be able to secure 
material at bargain prices; but there 
is another and a broader point of view 
from which it should be considered. 

In the first place it is well to consider 
what the object of the exporters is 
when they use Canada as a dumping 
around for the surplus products of their 
factories. We all know that it is a 
common* thing for nations as well as 
individuals to endeavor to' destroy their 
competitors. A few years ago, it will 
be remembered, the iron pipe manufac- 
turers in the United States endeavored 
to destroy similar manufacturers in 
Canada. But the Canadian manufac- 
turers bought up the iron pipe as it was 
imported, chainged the thread and ex- 
ported it to Great Britain, and under- 
sold the United States manufacturers 
in that market. This it will be remem- 
berer! put a stop to the effort to slaugh- 
ter the Canadian market. 

It is a well-known fact to those con- 
versant with the trade, and who regn- 



Hardware And 
Metal 



1 : 1 1 • I \ peruse the columns of the United 

States papers, that the manufactut 
in the l'nited States are getting quite 
concerned about Canada as a competi- 
tor in the iron and steel trades. The 
question, therefore, resolves itself into 
this: Are we prepared for the pui| 
of getting a few bargains in iron and 
steel, to run the risk of destroying, or 
ril least crippling, an industry which 
during the last eight years has made 
such great progress in this count r 

If the United States can make it un- 
comfortable for the iron and steel in- 
dustry in Canada this early in the period 
of quiet trade which is apparently set- 
ting in across the border, what may we 
expect should actual depression take 
place? 

In the United States, even if the 
Customs tariff was not as high as it is. 
there is a system of appraisement in 
vogue which would prevent that market 
from being used as a dumping g-round 
by Canada or any other country. In 
other words the Custom's appraiser 
places a price on the article imported ir- 
respective of what the invoice may 
show. An instance of this came under 
observation of " Hardware and 
M-Hal " noi long since. A representa- 
tive in the United States of a Can- 
adian manufacturing concern paid a 
visit to his principal's factory. There 
was a line of goods being manufactured 
which sohl to the trade at $12.50. He 
at once realized that if he could sell it 
in the United States at that price there 
would be a large business for his firm. 
He accordingly tools some samples with 
him, but when he endeavored to pass 
them through the Customs, the appraiser 
set the price for valuation at $35.00, and 
although he was shown that the price 
in Canada was $12.50, he could not be 
moved from the position he took. This » 
put an end to the effort to get business 
in the United States. 

Canada cannot afford to run any risk 
in regard to its iron and steel industry 
and it is to be hoped that the Govern- 
ment, between 'this and next session of 
Parliament will give the subject very 
careful consideration. 



A - 



H«rdw»r» •r>« 
M.t*l 



BD1T0RIAL 



CANADIAN TRADE WITH NEW 
ZEALAND. 

A CLOSE bond of sympathy through- 
out the Empire has borne excel- 
lent fruit in the better relations between 
the various colonies as well as between 
the colonies and the Mother Country. 

The preference sentiment is growing 
in scope as well as in intensity and there 
seems every reason to believe that within 
a few years all the chief British colon- 
ies will be ready to offer to as well as 
receive preference from Canada.. 

A growth of Imperial feeling is mani- 
fested in New Zealand, where a prefer- 
ence has been given Canada. This is 
bound to have its effect on all business 
relations between Canada and New Zea- 
land. 

One proof of the increasing interest 
in Canada throughout New Zealand has 
been given in an unusual number of sub- 
scriptions to " Hardware and Metal " 
coming in from large importers thei'e. 
The number of these during the past six 
months has been particularly large 
though this paper has been consistently 
advertised in Australia as a medium of 
trade information for some years. 

Another proof has come in a letter to 
the Canadian Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion from Mr. Zoeller de Schryer, its 
representative at Auckland, New Zea- 
land : 

' The latest and best news I can send 
you this mail is that our Government 
lias adopted a preferential tariff, which 
is greatly in favor of the Canadian 
manufacturers. 1 hope the manufac- 
turers will rise to the occasion and grasp 
the opportunity now offering in New 
Zealand with both hands. It is a rare 
chance of collaring the trade which in 
ever increasing volume has been carried 
on by the United States. Their ex- 
ports to this colony amounter to over 
seven million dollars last year, an item 
worth struggling lor. 

Keep Prices the Same. 

" When you are writing on the sub- 
ject urge your members not to raise 
their prices up to the level of the pre- 
ference, but first of all to make use of 
it to replace the Yankee. Later on. 



when this market has been fully con- 
quered, there will be a chance of better- 
ing prices. If they don't act prudently 
they have no chance, as the United 
States manufacturer, every awake where 
his interests are concerned, will meet 
the tari by reducing his prices as much 
as possible, and if Canadians raise theirs 
they will soon be on the same level, and 
things will go on as they were before, 
and a golden opportunity will be lost. 

" We are in the quiet season now, but 
prospects are better than ever, and if 
only your exporters are wide awake 
Canada will do a roaring trade in this 
colony, but I have strong doubts about 
their wide-awakeness, and not without 
reason. Rouse them up if you can." 
Many Articles Wanted. 
A large firm doing a wholesale busi- 
ness in New Zealand as saddlers, coach 
ironmongers, leather merchants and in- 
dentors, contractors* to the New Zealand 
Government, with head office in England, 
writes : 

" On account of the preferential tariff 
we would like to have quotations from 
you on the following: Canadian axles, 
half patent; common nut, Hughes 
patent, and Richards' long distance, the 
same as we have been getting from the 
Anchor Axle Company, Bidwell's axle 
grease, the same as got up by Isley, 
Doubleday & Co.; sewing machine oil in 
4 oz. bottles; wrought step treads, and 
shaft couplings, the same as got up by 
H. D. Smith & Co. ; whip sockets, dash 
rails, as got up by the Metal Stamping 
Co. ; bevel edge carriage bolts, the same 
as got up by the Union Nut & Bolt Co.; 
felloe plates, H. D. Smith & Co. ; 36-inch 
white cotton duck, No. 5 (for the last- 
year we bought about 22,000 yards of 
this) ; 36-inch No. 6 ditto, 54, 60 and 62- 
inch No. 6 ditto; blue cut swede iron 
upholsterers' tacks, the same as got up 
by the Atlas Tack Corporation; buggy 
harness, the same as supplied by Perkin, 
Campbell & Co. 

" Please let us know what saddlers' 

tools are made in Canada. Also let us 

know if you make sweat pads with three 

hooks. No. 22 klO ,the same as supplied 

28 



by the E. L. McLean Manufacturing Co., 
Creenfield, Ohio. Quote us also for 
reaper slats for putting on the aprons of 
reapers and binders, 60x3-4x3-8." 
Inquiry From Christchurch. 

A firm in Christchurch, N.Z., writes: 
" We are dealers in agricultural and 
general machinery, and among other 
lines have been importing the following 
from the United States: 

" Oil engines, stationary, portable, 
marine, traction, road machinery, grad- 
ers, rock crushers, etc., stray presses, 
windmills, etc. 

" Our Government has recently passed 
a preferential Customs Tariff Act which 
discriminates against foreign goods in 
some of our lines in favor of goods 
manufactured under the British flag, and 
if we can draw our supplies from your 
country it is probable we may wish to 
do so. We therefore wish to get into 
touch with your manufacturers, and 
shall be glad if you can help us to the 
extent of sending us some publication 
containing the business announcements 
of such firms. We may add that our 
selling and distributing organization 
covers the whole o fthis colony and we 
are pretty well fixed for doing business. 
Our United States purchases are paid 
for in cash in New York, and present 
arrangements could doubtless be applied 
to present arrangement. ' ' 

Another commission house writes: 

' ' The preferential trade bill just pass- 
ed by our Government, which increases 
the duties on foreign manufactured 
goods, will without doubt greatly assist 
Canadian firms to compete successfully 
in this market, as it gives preference to 
all parts of the Empire. We hope there- 
fore that it will result in a large in- 
crease of imports from Canada of sucli 
classes of goods as have previously come 
from the United States." 

Still another firm of importers and 
wholesalers at Auckland desires to be 
placed in touch with Canadian manu- 
facturers of wood working machinery, 
split pulleys, emery and corundum 
wheels, building materials, hose, roofiing 
and floor tiles. 



EDITORIAL 



Haidw»r« and 
Metal 



A GOOD GOVERNMENT IN 
TROUBLE. 

THE meaning of the election in 
North Renfrew is obvious. It 
means that the confidence of the people 
in the Ross Administration is gone. This 
is to be regretted. The Government, 
has on the whole, been a good one. 
Measured by the standards of Govern- 
ment in the other Provinces of the Do- 
minion, it is rather superior. But evil 
clays have evidently fallen upon it. 

Its political opponents may charge it 
with all sorts and conditions of malad- 
ministration. There is no doubt that 
some members of the Administration 
rest under very grave suspicion indeed ; 
but to charge the Government as a whole 
with maladministration is to lew a 
charge that cannot be substantiated by 
facts. 

The loss of prestige and the threat- 
ened loss of office is nearly altogether 
due to the acts of its servants. The 
acts of some of these servants will go 
down into the political history of this 
country as among the most disgraceful 
ever practiced. And these have gone on 
multiplying until they have practically 
ruined the Administration. The latter 
cannot plead irresponsibility. It is just 
as responsible as a merchant is for the 
action of his clerks; and it must pay 
the penalty. 

Placed under similar conditions a 
board of directors would either resign 
or at least make an appeal to the share- 
holders. This is what the Ross Govern- 
ment in Ontario should do. 

The people are the shareholders and 
they are manifestly dissatisfied. The 
least the Government, therefore, can do 
is to appeal to them through the ballot 
box. 

The plea that the Opposition is weak, 
may be true, but whatever may be the 
condition of Mr. Whitney and his party, 
the Government should not attempt to 
cany on the affairs of the Province un- 
der the present unsatisfactory state of 
affairs. 

Office is not everything. Good gov- 
ernment far transcends it in importance. 
As long as the present state of affairs 



exists Ontario cannot have good gov- 
ernment. 



U. S. TRADE WITH CANADA. 

THE unfairness of the United States 
tariff against Canada is illustrat- 
ed by statistics just given out from 
Washington on the trade between the 
two countries for the past Ken years. The 
total commerce of the United States in 
1893 was $1,652,000,000, while in 1903 it 
will aggregate about $2,460,000,000, an 
increase of about 50 per cent. In the 
meantime her trade with Canada has 
increased from less than $100,000,000 in 
1893 to over $185,000,000 in 1903, or 
approximately 85 per cent. That is to 
say the trade of the United States with 
Canada has increased nearly twice as 
fast as the whole trade of the great Re- 
public. But it. is on analysis of the con- 
stituents of this trade that the injustice 
becoir.es most apparent. Of our total 
trade with the United States we bought 
from them in 1903 $130,000,000 while 
they bought from us only $55,000,000. 
In 1893 the figures were respectively 
$57,000,000 and $34,000,000. That is, 
while our imports from them in ten years 
increased $73,000,000 or over 125 per 
cent, their imports from us increased 
only $21,000,000 or about 60 per cent. 
In short, our imports from the United 
States have increased twice as fast as 
their imports from us. 

It is apparent from these figures that 
Canada is the best market that the 
United States has. Americans are awak- 
ening to this fact as is evidenced by the 
growing agitation for reciprocity on the 
American side. Reciprocity which at 
one time had many friends in Canada, 
can at present scarcely summon a 
baker's dozen advocates, but on the 
other hand there is a growing feeling 
in Canada among both political parties 
■ in favor of a course of fiscal reprisals. 
The Canadian people felt but survived 
the McKinley and Dingley tariffs. They 
are more independent of American mar- 
kets than ever before in their history, 
while the importance of Canadian mar- 
kets to the United States was never so 
great as at present. 

Americans who are interested in the 
29 



Canadian trade would consult their in- 
terests by advocating the reduction of 
the absurdly high tariff which, as the 
above figures show, allows of only a one- 
sided trade, a kind of trade which 
will not be borne forever. 



STOCK TAKING. 

STOCKTAKING is the order of the 
day. The jobbers are already at 
it. The retail trade will soon be en- 
gaged in this masculine form of house- 
cleaning. It is no pleasant task to ran- 
sack the whole stock of a large store, 
but it is one of the very greatest import- 
ance. It is necessary, in the first place, 
in order to judge, correctly, the business 
done during the past year and secondly 
to bring to light forgotten lines or goods 
that have proved slow sellers. 

That the first end may be attained 
great care should be taken in the proper 
valuation of damaged, shopworn or out- 
of-date goods. To set them down in the 
stock list at cost price is merely to de- 
ceive one's self and to make all the 
worry and bother of no use. The mer- 
chant should be as flint against any dis- 
position to boost the value of his stock. 
He will be rewarded in the knowledge 
that his stock is actually worth what it 
appears in the stock lists, and that his 
nominal profits for the past year are 
not subject to any discount for dead 
stock on hand. 

But this is merely the bookkeeping 
side of stocktaking and is useful for the 
information not that is merely acquired 
but that is made use of as well. 

When, therefore, stock has been gone 
over and the damaged, shopworn or slow 
goods discovered the next thing is to get 
rid of them. They merely take up room. 
It would be a good idea to separate out 
all this kind of stock ; establish a bar- 
gain counter; advertise it well; and at 
once get rid of unappreciated goods and 
create the interest in your store always 
incident to a bargain counter. The large 
departmental stores have won no small 
part of their success by means of the 
bargain counter, there is no reason why 
the smaller merchant should not reap 
some of its advantage at least in getting 
rid of undesirable stock. 

With the capital thus set free a clean- 
er and fresher stock can be got in and 
discount saved. 



He 



rdware «nd 

tal 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Hardware. 
Montreal, December 31st. 1903. 

I^lllS is always the dullest month 
the year for the wholesale 
hardware trade. Travellers 
are all off the road and the 
number of sorting orders re- 
ceived this week is small. Several whole- 
sale houses are making the most of the 
slack season hv taking slock. While 
trade is very slack jus! now. wholesal- 
ers are well satisfied with the year's 
business. The holiday trade has been 
particularlj ° I this year. It is un- 
derstood thai the result of stocktaking 
operations concluded by several firms 
has been very satisfactory indeed. A 
number of complaints are heard this 
week that payments are not so prompt 
as might be desired or expected. Prices 
throughout are unchanged this week, 
cotton rope and twine being the only 
exception. In all probability there will 
be a still further advance on the prices 
quoted this week. 

Spring Hinges— There is some inquiry 
for sprins' hinges for 1904, but little 
actual business has been done. Prices 
are as follows: No. 5,- $17.25 
per gross; No. 10, $18 per gross; No. 
20, $10.50; No. 120, $20; No. 51, $9.25; 
No. 50, $27.50. 

Wire Nails — The local mills are closed 
down Ibis week for slock taking and 
repairs. We quote as follows: $2.40 per 
I eg in ca riots. and $2.45 per 
keg in small lots f.o.b. Gananoque, 
Montreal, London, Hamilton, Toronto, 
Brantford, Windsor, Out., and St. John. 

Cut Nails— Business is very quiet at 
unchanged prices. We quote; $2.45 per 
keg f.o.b. Montreal; car lots, $2.40. 

Fence Staples— There is some inquiry 
for 1904 delivery. Prices are steady and 
unchanged. We quote as follows; $3 per 
1004b. keg for galvanized, and 
$2.80 for bright; 25 to 50-lb. packages, 
25c extra. 

Pressed Spikes The discount is now 
25 per cent. 

Horsenails A Tier weeks of exception- 
al activity trade is now rather-slack. We 
nuote the following unchanged discounts : 
"M" brand. "Oval" and "New City" 
heads, 55 per cent.; "Countersunk" 
heads, 55 per cent.; "C" brand, 40, 10 
and 7 1-2 per cent, off; "Monarch," 50 
and 7 1-2 per cent, and "Peerless," 50 
per cent. 

Horseshoes — There is still some little 
activity but compared with the rush of 
a few weeks ago business seems quite 
slack. We quote as follows: Iron shoes, 
light and medium pattern, No. 2 and 
fergei', $3,65; No. 1 and smaller. $3.90; 
snow pattern, No. 2 and larger^ $3.90; 
No. I and smaller, $4.15; li-ht 



steel shoes, No. 2 and larger, 
$3.80; No. 1 and smaller, $4.05; 
featherweight, all sizes, to 4, $5.35; 
toe weight, all sizes, 1 to 4, $6.60. Shoes 
more than one size in a keg, 10c. per keg 
extra f.ob. Montreal only. 

Sleighbells— The holiday trade in bells 
this season surpassed that of any pre- 
vious year. There are still a few orders 
going out but there has been a big slack- 
ening this week. We quote: Back straps, 
30c. to $2 each ; bodv straps, 70c. to 
$2.50 each; shaft gongs, 2 bells, 20c; 3 
bells, 35 to 60c.; 4 bells, 55c. to $3 each; 
brass team bells. No. 1, $1.90 per dozen; 
No. 2, $2.40 per dozen; No. 3, $2.70 per 
dozen; No. 4, $3.70 per dozen; No. 5, 
$4.65 per dozen; York eye bells, No. 10, 
$1.35 per dozen: No. 12. $1.65; No. 14. 
$1.90; saddle gongs, $1.10 to $3 each. 

Skates — Trade is now commencing to 
slacken after a large and profitable run 
of holiday business. A few sizes of 
some lines are hard to obtain. We 
quote as follows: Halifax pat- 
tern, 37c. per pair; nickel-plated, 
65c: ladies' nickel-plated, 55c to $1.25; 
ladies' concave nickel-plated, $1.45; 
plain hockey, 27c to $1.3^5; nickel-plated 
hockev, 60c to $2.50; double end hoek- 
ev, $1.65 to $3. Skate straps, 70c to 
$1 .35. 

Hockey Sticks — One or two houses 
are cutting prices in order to clear this 
line of goods but for the most part 
prices are being well maintained as all 
wooden goods are firm in price. The 
holiday trade has been very active and 
sorting orders for hockey sticks have 
been among the principal items in a very 
dull week in wholesale trade. We quote : 
Best second-growth goalkeeper's, $3.80 
oe.r dozen: ash, $2.70; elm, $2.18: boys' 
elm. $1.10. Regulation ducks, $1.50 r>er 
dozen; boys', $1.15 per dozen. 

Fire Shovels— Still in seasonable de- 
mand. We quote: No. 70, 39c. per 
dozen; No. 55, 55 to 82c per dozen: No. 
57, 82c to $1.10 per dozen; No. (50, 70 
to 88c. per dozen; No. 65, $1.10 to $1.23 
per dozen ; Duplex, No. 7, 96c per doz. ; 
No. 9, $1.20 per dozen; No. 11, $1.54 per 
dozen. 

Snow Shovels — In seasonable request 
at unchanged prices. We quote the fol- 
lowing prices: " Habitant," $2.50 
to $2.75 nev dozen; "Victor." 30 per 
cent, off: steel railroad shovels, 45 pet- 
cent, off. 

Screen Wire Cloth — A typographical 
error last week made us quote at 
$1,451-2 per 100 sou are feet: the price 
is $1,42 1-2. An advance on this price 
is considered probable. 

Galvanized Wire This has been a 
quiet week'. There are some inquiries 
for 1904 business, but we have no* 
lua id of any Large sales this week. We 
quote the following unchanged prices: 



No. 5, $3.70; Nos. 6. 7 and 8, 
$3.15; No. 9, $2.55; No. 10, $3.20; No. 

11, $3.25; No. 12, $2.65; No. 13, $2.75; 
No. 14, $3.75. In carlots, f.o.b Cleve- 
land; No. 5, $2.20; Nos. 6, 7, 8 and 9, 
$2.15; No. 10, $2.20; No. 11, $2.25: No. 

12, $2.30; No. 13, $2.40: No. 14, $2.50. 
In less than carlots, 12 l-2c per 100 lb. 
extra charged. 

Barb Wire— There is considerable in- 
quiry for 1904 delivery. We quote 
again as follows: $2.80 per 

100 lb. f.o.b. Montreal, and $2.55 f.o.b 
Cleveland. Carlots of 15 tons, $2.45 
f.o.b. Cleveland. 

Smooth Steel Wire— A quiet market 
with no new featm-es to note. We nuote: 
Bright and annealed, $2.50 per 100 lb. 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Halifax, Lon- 
don, Hamilton and St. John. Net ex- 
tras per 100 lb. are now as follows: 
Coopered wire, 60c; tinned wire. $2; 
oiling, 10c: spring wire, $1.25; best 
steel wire, 75c: brierht soft-drawn. 15e. : 
hay-baling wire, 20 to 25c. 

Fine Steel Wire— Trade is quiet at 
nresent. The discount continues 25 >>pr 
cent, with net extras as follows: 1 and 
2-lb. hltnks, 25c per 100 lb.: 1-2-lb. 
hanks, 371-2c, and 1-4-lb. hanks. 50c 

Brass Wire — Business is fair at un 
changed discount, viz., 60 per cent. 

Copper Wire — Business fair: discount 
60 per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs— A quiet trade is 
reported at unchanged prices. We again 
quote as follows: Best iron rivets, 
section carriage and wagon box, 
black rivets, tinned do., coopers' rivets 
and tinned swede rivets, 60 and 10 per 
cent.; swedes iron burrs are quoted al 
55 per cent, off: copper rivets with the 
usual proportion of burrs. 45 per cent 
off and coppered iron rivets and burrs. 
in 5-lb. carton boxes art 1 quoted at 60 
and 10 per cent, off list. 

Bolts and Nuts— Trade is fairly active 
but the recent reduction in price has not 
stimulated it very much. We quote: Car- 
riage bolts, common ($1.00) list, 3-16 
and 1-4 diameter, 60 per cent.; carriage 
bolts, common ($1.00) list. 5-16 and 
3-8 diameter, 55 and 5 per cent.; car 
riage bolts, common ($1.00) list, 7-16 
diameter and up, 55 per cent.; carriage 
bolts, full square ($2.40) list. 60 per 
cent.: carriage bolts. Norway iron 
($3.00) list. 60 per cent.; machine bolts, 
3-8 diameter and under. 60 pet cent.; 
machine bolts. 7-1(1 diameter and larger, 
55 and 5 per cent.: plow bolts, 55 and 
5 per cent.; blank bolls, 55 and 5 per 
cent.; bolt ends. 55 and 5 per cent.: 
sleigh shoe bolts, 70 per cent.: coach 
screws, com' point. 70 per cent.; nuts, 
square, all sizes. |e. per lb. off; nuts, 
hexagon, all sizes. 4 1-4c per lb. off. 

Washers. 15 per cent. off. 



30 



THE MARKETS 



Hi 



rdware and 
Metal 



Cutlery— Tin' holiday trade has been 
the best in years. All kinds of cutlery 
are in excellent demand. Jobbing' bouses 
have to order many months ahead in 
order to have their orders filled by the 
English and German manufacturers. 

Screws— .Thei-e have been a few sort- 
ing orders during the week but trade 
is very quiet. We quote the fol- 
lowing: Round head bright, 821-2 
per cent.; flat head bright, 871-2 
per cent. ; brass, round head, 75 per 
cent.; brass, flat head, 80 per cent. 

Shot — A few sorting orders are still 
coming in. Trade is on the dull side. 
We again quote as follows: Ordin- 
ary drop shot, A.A.A. to dust, $6.50 per 
100 lb.; chilled, Nos. 1 to 10, $7 per 100 
lb.; buck and seal, $7.50 per 100 lb.; 
ball, $8 per 100 lb. Trade discount 
171-2 per cent, f.o.b Montreal, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London, St. John, N.B., and 
rlalifax. 

Lanterns— Prices remain unchanged. 
Our qoutations are as follows : 
Lift, hinged or tilt, $4 to $4.25 per doz. ; 
cold blast No. 2, $7 to $7.50: painted 
dashboard, $6.50 to $6.75: plain dash- 
board, $6 to $6.25; searchlierht, $20 to 
$24 doz.; brass cold blast, small, $0.75 
to $10. 

Cordage— To the remarks in these 
columns last week and the special article 
on the cordage situation there is nothing 
to add. The position of manila hemp 
is considered very strong- statistically 
and prices throughout should be very 
strong- in consequence. Cotton rope and 
twine are advancing- in price. We 
again quote as follows: Pure man- 
ila, 141-2c. : British pure manila, 12c; 
sisal, 11 l-2c. ; double lathyarn, lie: 
single lathyarn, 10 l-2c. ; Russian tarred 
sminyarn i.3 1-2c ; jute rope, 3-8-in. in 
diam. and upwards, 9c; cotton rope, 
20c: cotton twine, 20 and 23c for 
3 and 4 "IV. Cotton bedcord, 90c to 
$1.70, according- to length. Sash cord 
27 to 28c 

Building Paper— Trade is very quiet 
just now, but manufacturers are well 
satisfied with the volume of business for 
1903. We quote as follows: Tarred 
felt, $1.85 per- 100 lb.; 2-ply 
i-eadv roofing, 90c per roll; 3-ply. 
$1.15 per roll; carpet felt, $2.25 per 100 
ib. ; dry sheathing, 40c per roll: tar 
sheathing, 50c per roll: dry fibre, 55c 
pet roll ; tarred fibre, 65c per roll: O.K. 
and T.X.L., 70c per roll: heavy straw 
and sheathing, $35 per ton; slaters' felt, 
fine, per roll. 

Firebricks — Trade is still very disap- 
pointing. English are quoted at $16 to 
$22 per 1,000 and Scotch at $17 to $22. 

Cement— Business is absolutely dead. 
We quote as follows : Canadian cement, 
$1.90 to $2.25; German. $2.25 to $2.40; 
English, $2.15 to $2.25: Belgian, $1.70 to 
$1.95 per bbl.. ex store, and American, 
$2.20 to $2.40 ex-cars. 

Plumbing Goods. 

There has been some slackening in the 
demand for plumbing supplies and trade 
this week can scarcely be described as 



active. Iron pipe is in very good de- 
mand for the season. 

Lead Pipe— A fair trade is reported 
at unchanged prices. Composition and 
waste are selling at 8c and ordinary 
at 7c The discount is 35 per cent. 

Iron Pipe — As noted above, business 
continues remarkably good for the sea- 
son. We may repeat remarks made be- 
fore as to concessions from prices quot- 
ed. For good orders discounts as high 
as 10 per cent, are obtainable. We 
quote: Standard pipe, per 100 
feet, in lengths under 19 feet — black, 
1-8-in., $2.30; 1-4-in., $2.30; 3-8-in., 
$2.55; 1-2-in., $2.85; 3-4-in., $3.65; 1-in., 
$5.20; 1 1-4-in., $7.35; 1 1-2-in., $8.95; 
2-in., $12.55. Galvanized — 1-4-in., $3.20; 
3-8-in., $3.45; 1-2-in., $3.90; 3-4-in., $5; 
1-in., $7.20; 1 1-4-in., $10.05; 1 1-2-in., 
$12.20 ; 2-in., $16.85. Extra heavy pine, 
plain ends, are quoted per 100 feet as 
follows: Black, 1-2-in., $4.20: 3-4-in., 
$5.25; 1-in., $7.55; 1 1-4-in., $10.55; 
1 1-2-in., $12.75; 2-in., $17.60. Galvan- 
ized-1-2 in., $5.20; 3-4-in., $6.65;*l-in., 
$9.55; 1 1-4-in., $13.25; 1 1-2-in., $16; 
2-in.. $21. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— In steady 
request at the following unchanged dis- 
counts from the list prices: Light 
soil pipe, 3 to 6-in., 50 and 10 
per cent.: medium and extra heavy 
soil pipe, 2 and 6-in., 60 per cent.; ex- 
tra heavy soil pipe, 8-in., 45 per cent. 
Light fittings. 2 to 6-in., 50 and 10 per 
cent.: medium and extra heavv fittings, 
2 to 6-in.. 60 and 5 per cent.; extra 
heavy fittings 8-in., 45 per cent. 

Solder — The demand is steady. Prices 
are reported very firm. We quote: Wire 
solder. 171-2c;' bar, 17c 

METALS. 

As was to be expected there has been 
a considerable slackening in general 
business this week. One of the largest 
metal houses in Montreal assure us, how- 
ever, that they have not experienced this 
year the total stagnation which has been 
customary at this season. Half of their 
staff are busy taking stock and the 
others are kept busy with the orders on 
band. For forward delivery there has 
been very little business this week in 
tin plates or galvanized iron, although 
some large sales were made about a fort- 
night ago. Ingot tin is very firm in the 
primary markets and hence there has 
been a further advance in Montreal. 
Sales are being made at very close 
prices from stocks in hand. Copper is 
slightly weaker in primary markets at 
time of writing, but local quotations are 
well maintained. 

Pig Iron— As was stated in our last 
issue, trade is now very quiet. There 
are very few, if any, sales for forward 
delivery. Londonderry iron will be on 
the market very soon. Our quotations 
are as follows: Summerlee, $19.50 
to $20; Can-on, No. 1, $21: do., 
No. 3. $18.50 to $19; Middlesboro', No. 
3, $17 to $17.50: Aversome, No. 1, $20: 
do., No. 3, $19.40. 

Bar Iron— Business is very quiet this 
week. Prices as quoted in last issue are 



unchanged. We again quote: Merchants' 
bar, $1.85; horsehoe iron, $2.10; forged 
iron, $2.05. 

Black Sheets— Trade is fairly active 
at present ; prices are unchanged. We 
quote as follows: 2,8 gauge, $4.2:") : 
26 gauge, $2.40; 22 to 24 gauge, $2.35; 
18 to 20 gauge, $2.30, and 8 to 10 gauge, 
$2.40. 

Galvanized Iron — Some large orders 
were booked a couple of weeks ago but 
trade this week shows little activity. 
We again quote as follows: (lorbal's 
"Best Best," $4.,30; 28 Queen's 
Head, $4.30; Apollo, 10 3-4 o/.., 
$4.30; Fleur-de-Lis, $4; Comet, $4; Bell 
brand, $4. In less than case lots 25c. 
extra. 

Tinplates — Business this week has 
been practically at a standstill, although 
some large sales were made about two 
weeks a;fo. Owing to the increasing- 
strength of the tin market, prices for 
tinplates are very firm. We quote een- 
erally: Cokes, $3.75 and charcoals, $4. 

Ingot Tin— Primary markets show in- 
creasing strength and it would scarcely 
be possible to fill orders with new stock 
at the lowest prices which are quoted 
by Montreal houses. These prices are 
only possible when houses have stocks 
on hand. We quote 31 to 32 l-2c 

Terne Plates— Prices are unchanged. 
We quote: $6.75 to $7. 

Coil Chains— A fairly active trade is 
reported at the following unchanged 
and steady prices : No, 6, 1 Oc ; 
No. 5, 9c'.; No. 4, 8 l-2c ; No. 
3, 7c; 1-4-in., $6.10; 5-16-inch, $4.70; 
5-8-in., $4; 7-16-in., $3.80; 1-2-in., $3.70; 
9-16-in., $3.55; 5-8-in., $3.35: 3-4-in., 
$3.30; 7-8-in., $3.25; and 1-in., $3.20. 
with 10c allowance on carlots. 

Canada Plates— We quote: 52s., $2.40; 
60s., $2.45 to $2.50; 75s.. $2.55: full 
polished, $3.60, and galvanized, $4 to 
$4.10; galvanized, 60s., $4.25 to $4.35. 

Steel— Business is only fair. We quote : 
Sleighshoe, $1.95 to $2;'tire, $2 to $2.10; 
spring, $2.75 to $3: reeled machinery, 
$2.75 to $3; toe calk, $2.60; ' machinery 
(iron finish 1 ) $2.50; square harrow, 
$2.50. 

Tool Steel— A satisfactory volume of 
business is passing at the following un- 
changed prices: Black Diamond, 8 to 
9c; Sanderson's, 8 to 9c, according 
to the grade; Jessop's, 13c; Jonas & 
Colver's. 10 to 20c: " Air Hardening," 
f)0 to 65c. per lb.: Conqueror, 71 -4c. 

Ingot Copper — Primary markets are 
slightly weaker than at the time of our 
last report, but local prices are being- 
well maintained. We quote $13.50 to 
$13.75 per 100 lbs. 

Pig Lead- Quoted at $3.20 to $3.30. 

Sheet Zinc — A fair amount of busi- 
ness is passing at steady prices. We 
quote $6.15 to $6.25 for cash lots; small- 
er quantities, $6.50. 

Zinc Spelter— The price is nominally 
6c, but it is understood that conces- 
sions are obtainable for good orders. 



31 



H«rdw»rr and 
Metal 



THE MARKETS 



Scrap Metals— Trade this week ap- 
pears tn be absolutely dead. In the ab- 
sence of actual transactions quotations 
are merely nominal. We quote as fol- 
lows: Heavy copper and wire, 91-2 
to 10c per lb.; light copper 10c: heavy 
red brass, 10c. ; heavy yellow, 8 l-2c. : 
light brass, 5 l-2c. ; lead, 2 1-4 to 2 l-2c. ; 
/.inc. 2 3-4 to 3c; iron, No. 1 wrought, 
$11 to $12; machinery scrap, $13 to $15; 
stove plate, $12; mailable and steel, $6; 
mixed countrv rags, 60 to 70c per 100 
lb.; old rubbers 6 to 6 l-2c per lb. 

Ashes. 

There are very few offerings at pres- 
ent. Prices as quoted are unchanged. 

First pots, per c«t "• 5 95 6 00 

Seconds ■ • ■ • ;™ 

Pearls, per 1001b 7 00 7 25 

Hides. 

Beef hides have dropped another half 
cent. Receipts from country points are 
large. We quote: 

No. 1 beef hides 08 084 

v 2 " 07 074 

nX.3 06 0« 5 

Lambskins JJ ; *J 

Xn 1 calfskins 

ft 2 '• ° 8 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 
HARDWARE. 

Toronto, January, 2, 1904. 

r "P > HE new year opens with a much 
stronger spirit of optimism mani- 
festing itself in all branches of 
the hardware trade. Manufacturers and 
wholesale dealers are busy stocktaking, 
and the general verdict, is that buying 
has been more active in all lines than 
was anticipated. Buying for Spring de- 
livery has opened up nicely and from 
the size of orders received it is clear 
that a good Spring trade is counted on. 
The onlv cloud in the horizon is the fear 
of United States competition. The dan- 
ger of that is likely to be magnified for 
political purposes, yet it is clear that in 
many lines there is a more determined 
effort on the part of United States pro- 
ducers to get rid of some of their sur- 
plus product on the Canadian market. 
This may have an unsettling effect on 
some lines, but the general disposition is 
to keep prices firm. Manufacturers of 
screen wire cloth have stiffened their 
quotations, the figures now being $1.50 
per 100 square feet. The prices on 
spring hinges for 1904, first noted last 
week, still hold good. There is a good 
movement of seasonable lines such as 
sleighbells, skates, hockey sundries, snow 
shovels, etc. There is a big movement 
this year in particularly heavy shovels. 
Building paper is also active. Prices 
have been fixed for three months at pres- 
ent quotations. Cotton cordage is still 
firm but present prices hold good. 

Screen Wire Cloth— New prices pro in- 
~to effect to-day, the quotations now be- 
ing $1.50 per 100 square feet, an ad- 
vance of' 5c There is not likely to be 
any United States competition in Can- 
ada on this line as the works of one of 
the largest producers in the United 
States were destroyed by fire a few days 
ago. 



Spring hinges— Prices quoted for the 
year are as follows: No. 5, $17.25 
per gross; No. 10, $18 per gross; No. 20. 
$10.50; No. 120, $20; No. 51, $9.25; No. 
50, $27.5(1. 

Wire— There is very little doing, but 
prices are steadily maintained. 

Wire and Cut Nails— A few orders for 
later delivery are coming in. Prices 
steady with the base price $2.45 per keg 
f.o.b. Toronto. 

Screws— Prices are fairly steady. A 
moderate trade is doing. We quote as 
follows: Flat head bright, 87 1-2 per cent 
discount ; round head bright 82 1-2 per 
cent.; flat head brass, 80 per cent.: round 
head brass, 75 per cent . : round head 
•bronze, 70 per cent.: flat head bronze, 
75 per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs— Business is quiet 
and prices unchanged. Our quota- 
tions are: Iron rivets, 60 and 10 
per cent, discount; iron burrs, 55 per 
cent.; copper rivets, with usual propor- 
tion of burrs, 45 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — There are still some 
United States bolts and nuts offering, 
but the sale of them is not large. Prices 
are steady. We quote as follows: Car- 
riage bolts, common ($1 list), 3-16 and 
1-4-in., 60 per cent.; 5-16 and 3-8-in., 
55 and 5 per cent.; 7-16 and up, 55 per- 
cent.: carriage bolts, full" square ($2.40 
list), 60 per cent.; carriage bolts, Nor- 
way iron ($3 list), 60 per cent.; ma- 
chine bolts, 3-8 and less, 60 per cent. ; 
7-16 and up. 55 and 5 per cent.: coach 
screws, cone points, 66 2-3 and 10 per 
cent. 

Cordage — The biff advance in cotton 
cordaoe is still maintained, but no fur- 
ther increase is noted this week. Our 
quotations are as follows: Pure 
manila. 141-2c; British pure manila. 
12c: sisal. 11 l-2c ; double lathyarn, 
11 1-2c. : sfne'le lathyarn, 11c: double 
shingleyarn, 11 1-2c. ; single shingleyarn, 
11c: sashcord "Hercules," 29 to 30c: 
" Star." 36 to 40c: cotton rope, 3-16-* 
in. and up. 20 1-2 to 22c ; 5-32-in., 25 to 
27c: 1-8-in.. 25 to 2,8c.: cotton twine. 
3-plv. 22 to 24c: 4-ply. 26 to 28c 

Cutlery— There is not much doing at 
this moment, but there has been a a'ood 
demand and a nice trade is anticipated. 

Skates— The rush of orders is already 
beginning to have its effect on stocks 
held here, some sizes being exhausted. 
Prices are steady. 

Harness— A particularly good demand 
for sleighbells and horse robes is report- 
ed, at steady prices. 

Snow Shovels— A nice trade lias been 
done, a feature being the demand for 
heavy shovels. 

Woodenware -Business is quiet. We 
emote per dozen : Washboards, Victor. 
$1.35: Crown. $1.45; Improved Globe. 
$1.60: Standard Globe, $1.70: Original 
solid Globe, $2: Superior Solid Back 
Globe, $2.15: Jubilee. $2.10; Pony, 95c; 
Dominion Kins: f^ass). $3.10. ' Tubs. 
No. 0. $10.50; No. 1. $8.50: No. 2, $7 50- 
No. 3. $6.50. Pails. No. 1. 2 hoops 
$1.75 and $1.90. 

Building Paper— Building paper is 

dull this week. We emote: Tarred felt, 

32 



$1.85 per 100 lb.; 2-ply ready roofing. 
9()c. per roll; 3-plv. $1.15 per roll; car- 
pet felt, $2.25 per 100 lb.; dry sheath- 
ing, 40c per roll; tar sheathing, 50c per 
roll: dry fibre, 55c per roll; tarred fibre. 
65c. per roll; O.K. and I.X.L., 70c per 
roll ; heavy straw and sheathing, $35 per 
ton: slaters' felt, 60c per roll. 

Cement— There is very little cement 
moving. Prospects are that the market 
will brighten early in January. We 
quote the following prices: Canadian 
Portland at $2.05 to $2.65 Toronto, and 
$1.65 to $1.90 at the works: American 
Portland, $2 Toronto. 

Firebricks — The market for firebricks 
is quiet at present. Our quotations are: 
28 to 33c. for English, and 30 to 35c for 
Scotch. 

PLUMBING GOODS. 

The activity of recent weeks has 
quieted down and now, with the excep- 
tion of city trade there is little doing. 
Iron pipe prices are still easy, but a 
steady market on nearly all materials is 
noted. 

Lead Pipe — There is not much doing. 
We quote as follows: Lead. 7c: lead 
waste pipe, 8c: discount 35 per cent. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— A moderate 
trade continues; prices unchanged. We 
quote: Light soil pipe, 45 and 5 per 
cent.; light soil pipe fittings, 50 and 
5 per cent: medium andextra heavy 
pipe and fittings, 55 and 5 per cent.: 7 
and 8-in. pipe, 40 and 5 per cent. 

Iron Pipe Fittings— Business is keep- 
ing up fairly well. We quote .(Us- 
ing up satisfactorily. We quote dis- 
counts as follows: Malleable fittings. 15 
per cent.: cast iron (not standard). 
571-2 per cent.; headers, 521-2 per 
cent.: flanged unions, 521-2 per cent.: 
bushings and plugs, 571-2 per cent.: 
unions, 55 per cent ; nipples, 2-in., 65 
per cent.; nipples, 2 1-2 to 6-in., inclu- 
sive, 60 per cent. 

Copper Range Boilers — A, fair busi- 
neess is doing, with discounts at 15 per 
cent. 

Brass Goods.— A fair trade is doing, 
especially in steamfiitters' brass goods. 
Prices are steady throughout. 

Iron Pipe— Though prices were ma- 
terially lowered last week the market 
is still rather easv. We quote f.o.b. 
Toronto as follows: 1-8-in., $3.25: 1-4- 
in., $2.40: 3-8-in.. $2.55: 1-2-in.. $2.85: 
3-4-in., $3.65; 1-in., $5.20; 1 1-4-in.. 
$7.35: 1 1-2-in., $8.95; 2-in., $12.55: 
2 1-2-in.. $17.25; 3-in.. $22.75; 3 1-2-in. . 
$28.75; 4-in., $35.25. 

METALS. 

There is little doing. Factories, gen- 
erally speaking, are stocktaking and are 
busier fixing up their plants than buy- 
ing raw materials. Prices are, on the 
whole steady, and all the indications 
point to a stronger market except in bar 
iron, which shows another decline of 5c. 

Pig Iron— A better feeling is manifest- 
ed, partly as a result of the stronger 
situation in the United States. Some 
iron is coming in from Sydney, N.S.. 
at present. Prices of Midland 

and Hamilton iron are nominally $18.50 
for No. 1 and 18 for No. 2 at the mills. 



PORTLAND CEMENT 

CANADIAN, ENGLISH, 

GERMAN and BELGIAN. 

FIRE BRICKS, FIRE CLAY, 

ENAMELLED BRICKS, all colors. 
BUILDING BRICKS. 

SEWER PIPES, CULVERT PIPES, 
WHEELBARROWS, 

FOUNDERS' and CON- 
TRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 
. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWEIOTE 



Double Strength Culvert Pip* 
a Specialty. 

'he CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO 

HAMILTON. OUT. TORONTO. OMT 

ST jCM SS QO p 



Deseronto Iron Co, 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Irot 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Mallear, e 
Castings, Boiler lubes, Engine Cylinders, II , 
draulic and other Machinery wh--re great s'rei g"i 
i« r quired : Strong, High Silicon Iron, Or Fou.,Ur\ 
I'urposes. 



u 



JJ 



MIDLAND 

BRAND 

Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Price to Sales Agents 

Drummond McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE. 

or to 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. Limited 



THE MARKETS 



' Bar Iron — Prices arc again 5c. lower 
There is not much doink Quotations 

arc now as ' follows: $1.80 l'.o.h. 
Toronto for extras cut to length 
while rolling'; 2 ft. and over, LOc. per 
100 11..; 1 ft. and under 2 ft., 15c. : under 
1 ft. 20c, over 20 ft. by special agree- 
ment according to length and size. 

Black Sheets— Prices are unchanged, 
a fair business doing. We quote: 10 to 
16 gauge, $2.50; 18 to 20 gauge, $2.70; 
22 to 24 gauge, $2.90; 30 gauge, $3. 

Canada Plates— An active demand at 
steady prices. Prices are unchanged. 
We quote: All dull, $2.60; half-polish- 
ed, $2.70; and all-bright, $3.50. 

Tin — Prices continue to advance on 
outside markets. This has stimulated 
buying here as local quotations have not 
been changed yet. We quote prices at 
$29.50 to $30.50. 

Galvanized Sheets— A fair trade is 
doing at steady prices. We quote: 
Queen's Head, '$4.25 to $4.50 for 28 
gauge ; American, $4.40 for 24 gauge : 
Bell brand, $4.25 for 28 gauge; Gordon 
Crown, $4.25 for 28 gauge. 

Tinplates — A better feeling prevails. 
There is more competition from United 
States houses than formerly. A more 
active demand is noted. We qucte as 
follows: Coke plates, bright, 14x20, 
$3.75; charcoal plates, $4.25. 

Copper— Prices in British and U. S. 
markets are still stiffening. The 
local market, while considerably 
stronger, shows no change, prices being 
as follows: Ingot copper, $14, and sheet 
copper, $20 per 100 pounds. 

Brass— There is a fair trade, with the 
discount steady at 15 per cent. 

Lead — A considerable advance is re- 
ported at outside market, but local quo- 
tations are steady. We quote: $3.30 per 
100 lb. for pig lead and $3.65 for bar 
lead. 

Zinc Spelter — Prices show an upward 
tendency at primary market, but the 
local situation is unchanged at 6 to 
61 -2c. per lb. 

Zinc Sheets— The market is firm and 
a fair business doing. We quote : Cask 
lots, $6.75 to $7, and part casks, $7 to 
$7.25. 

Solder — Good trade doing. Prices 
are still stiffening. We quote: Guaran- 
teed half-and-half, at 18c, and wiping, 
17c 

Hides, Skins and Wool. 

Very little change is noticeable in the 
market this week. Dealers report a 
moderate demand with prices ruling at 
last week's quotations. We quote : 

HIDES. 

No. 1 green, per lb 074 

" 2 " " 06? 

" 1 " steers, per lb 08 

" 2 ' 07 

Cured, per lb 08} 

CALFSKINS. 

Veal skins, ISO. 1, 6 to it in. inclusive 09 

"2 " " " 07 

1 15 to 20 lb " 08 

2 " " 06 

Deacons (dairies), each 60 70 

Lamb and sheep skins 85 

WOOL. 

Unwashed wool, per lb 09 10 

Fleece wool, " 16 175 

Pulled wools, super, per lb 17 19 

" " extra " 20 21 

Tallow, per lb o 044 04$ 

33 



Hardware »nd 



"DOMINION GROWN 

A guarantee of quality on 

Bar and Hoop Iron, 

Best Horseshoe Iron, 

B.B. Charcoal Tinplates, 

Polished Steel Sheets, 

Polished Canadas, etc. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

509-512 merchants Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 



YOU CAN DRAW TRADE 
—by selling— 

McDougall 
Pumps 

The man vrho bays 

;i McDougall Pump 
is sure to be satisfied 
with it and will come 
to you for other 
things. 

Send foi uatalogufi 

McDougall Pumps : 
—Made in Canada | 

The R. McDougall Co., Limited 

GALT, ONTARIO. 




We have made 
further improve- 
ments in our 
"Crown Jewel" 
Axe. There is no 
axe that will sell 
more readily at a 
good profit. 

Ditto Aie 
Works, 

DUNDAS, ONT. 




Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers of — ■ 

Ferrona Pig Iron 



And SIEMENS MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEE 






Hardware and 
Met„l 



THE MARKETS 



BUSINESS CONDITIONS IN BRITISH 
-COLUMBIA. 

( By c ur own correi-pondent. ) 

\ RATHEK unique method of re- 
A-\ pairing a vessel when a dry dock 
L of sufficient capacity is not avail- 

able is being tried with the steamer 
Moana of the Canadian-Australian line. 
The steamer was injured by striking her 
stern on a reef at the William Head 
quarantine station the day sbe arrived 
from Sydney. Since then, the Govern- 
ment dry dock at Esquimalt has not 
been free, as the flagship of the North 
Pacific squadron, H.M.S. Grafton, was 
in for overhauling, and now the dock 
will be required for some weeks to re- 
pair H.M.S. Flora, which ran on the 
rocks of Village Island and was badly 
Injured. The rule applying to the dock 
is that the Imperial navy vessels must 
have precedence, and the navy officials 
in this instance cannot very well do 
anything else, as the Flora is badly used 
up and useless until she is repaired 
The proposition which is being attempt- 
ed with the Moana is to build a coffer- 
dam round her stern and when she is 
fitted up and beached the cofferdam will- 
be pumped out. The cofferdam has been 
built and is now being fitted to the ves- 
sel. By the beginning of the week it 
will be' ready for emptying. The work 
of repairing, granted that the cofferdam 
idea is a success, will take two weeks of 

more. 

• • • 

Another shipping accident which oc- 
curred up the coast this week gives op- 
portunity for the display of another 
emergency plan of repairs. The C.P.R. 
steamer Amur, which is in the Skag- 
way service, ran on a reef at the en- 
trance of the harbor of Port Simpson, 
in a dense fog in the night of December 
16. While news of her accident was be- 
ing brought down by the steamer Far- 
alion, a Seattle steamer, the Amur was 
anxiously awaited. The Dominion Gov- 
ernment telegraph line between Simp- 
son and Telegraph Creek was out of re- 
pair, so no advices were received. The 
steamer losl her propeller- and had her 
tail shaft broken, as her stern struck the 
reef, so thai she was quite helpless. It 
was fortunately within half a mile of 
tin- wharf al Port Simpson and a small 
steamer was utilized to tow her in. A 
new tail shaft and propeller were sent 
up on the steamer Danube and Capt. 
Troup, superintendent of the C.P.R. 
steamers, and W. J. Macgowan. super- 
intendent engineer, went north to oxer- 
see the shipping of the new shaft and 
propeller. The steamer will be beach- 
ed for the purpose, on a sand spit near 
the wharf. The plates of her outside 
bottom will not tie repaired as her 
double bottom will prevent her making 
water. 

The accident has brought the harbor 
of Port Simpson rather prominently in- 
to notice, seeing that there has been si. 
nnii'li talk of making it the terminus of 
the Pacific of the new Canadian trans- 
continental line. The entrance is so full 
of sunken reefs, that the opinion is free- 
ly ventured here, that it will never be 



4> 



o°' 



^* ^o-\cP 









*X*%^/ 1879-Twenty-Sixth Greeting-1 904 /^/> 

rf>v# ^^ MONTREAL. >* *" *\«* 










THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers of 
Set and Cap Sorews, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs, 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 
INGERSOLL, ONT. 



Rails 



12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 24, 30, 35 and 56 lbs, to 
the Yard- -carried in STOCK for prompt ship- 
ment. TRACK REQUISITES. 



Sesscnwein Bros., 



103 Shannon St. 

. . MONTREAL. 



~Wo invite 

inquiries 

for 



STEEL RAILS, 



BAR IRON, PIG IRON GALVAN- 
IZED IRON, CANADA PLATES, 
TINPLATES, WIRE ROPE (W. B. 
BROWN & CO,), CEMENT, FIREBRICKS, ORE BAGS, GRAIN BAGS, ETC. 



C. F. JACKSON & CO., Limited, IMPORTERSand COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

151 Hastings St. W., VANCOUVER, B.C . and LIVERPOOL. ENGLAND. 



the terminus. There are many advo- 
cates of Kitamaat Arm, a land-locked 
inlet, much like Burrard Inlet, Van- 
couver's famous harbor. The only draw- 
back is that the former is so far from 
open water, that is, there is a long' chan- 
nel which makes it a slow blace to get 
into. Otherwise it would be an ideal 
location for the seaport terminus of a 

great railway. 

• • • 

A". F. Cotton, C.E.j of New Westmins- 
ter, an engineer well known on this 
roast, returned on Sunday with a party 
of men I'ioiii Skeena River, where he has 
been busy for the past three months on 
a preliminary survey. Mr. Cotton would 
not talk of his work, saying that he 
would have to report to his company 
first. It is understood that he was mak- 
ing the survey in the interests of the 
Grand Trunk Pacific people. He was up 
the Skeena River as far as Hazelton and 
covered much of the territory interven- 
ing between that point and Port Simp- 
son, as well as on the alternative route 
from Kitsalas Canyon to Kitamaat. For 
the latter, the only alteration necessary 
from the route to Port Simpson, is 
merely to branch off from the Skeena 
River at Kitsalas Canyon, which is about 
125 miles ui> from Simpson. From that 
point, a line could follow a valley to 
Kitamaat Arm. 



The cannerymen and cannery supply 
dealers will begin receiving their stocks 
of tinplates and other cannery hardware, 
imported from the Old Country early in 
the year. One of the steamers of the 
Blue Funnel Line, the Oanfa, is due to 
arrive in port here or at Victoria from 
Liverpool about January 1, and another, 
the Peleus, before the middle of the 
month. Each of them will discharge 
here large quantities of tinplate, acid. 
lead, solder, and other supplies. The 
placing of the steamers of the China 
Mutual and Ocean Steam Navigation 
Co. lines, in the direct, Pacific coast ser- 
vice between here and Great Britain, 
has had the effect of cutting down the 
quantities of cannery supplies brought 
by sailing ships. Formerly all the 
heavy goods of these classes came by 
sailing vessels round the Horn. This 
\car the steamers coming via the Suez, 
India and the Orient have secured the 
hulk of the traffic. 

• • • 

The fact that the American Tinplate 
iv., the tinplate combine of the United 
States, has established an agency in 
Vancouver shows that this company has 
started to seek business here, and as the 
canneries are the heaviest buyers of 
tinplate it is likely the British product 
will have a keen competitor for the trade 
of this Province. Of course it is claimed 



:U 



THE MARKETS 



H. 



rdware and 
Metal 



for the Uuited States product that it is 
better tinned, and that it is cheaper. 
As to the former, a test should settle 
it, aim as to price, if the trade goes to 
theni instead of sticking' to the Welsh 
made article, that will be evidence that 
it is cheaper. As cannery supplies, such 
as tinplate, are practically bought a year 
ahead, the stock required for the coming 
season will not be sold by the Ameri- 
can concern, but the assertion is made 
that the trade will be divided up with 
them for the following season. As the 
run of scckeyc is not anticipated to be 
large this .\ear, but the next year's catch 
is expected to be heavy, the require- 
ments will hi- greater another season. 

* • • 

Further reports received from Cum- 
berland, where the Dunsmuir Company 
has struck a seam of anthracite coal in 
their mines, seem to confirm the impres- 
sion that a genuine hnd has been made. 
It is said the seam develops greater di- 
mensions with further exploration. The 
quality is claimed to be superior to any- 
thing but that of the best Pennsylvania, 
which it resembles, and which it is ex- 
pected' to fully equal. The value of 
such a find in this Province, where all 
the coast-mined coal is bituminous, can- 
not be over-estimated. The search for 
anthracite coal in paying quantities in 
the coast district of British Columbia 
has long been carried on, and the Wel- 
lington Mines Co., the Dunsmuirs' Com- 
pany, has been assiduous in their efforts 
which seem at last to have been crowned 

with success. 

• • • 

Railway building is not stopped by 
Winter on the coast, the V. W. & Y. R. 
Co. being still busy with tvacklaying on 
their line between this city and New 
Westminster. In New Westminster 
they have built right along the Fraser 
River between the water and the C. P. 
R.'s track. The latter company has 
been disputing the right of the V. W. 
& Y. R. before the Railway Committee 
of the Privy Council, but that body has 
held that the city of New Westminster 
which gave the right to the V. W. & Y. 
R., is the undisputed owner of the 25 
feet strip of land between Front street 
and the edge of the bank of the Fraser 
River, within the city limits. The ex- 
pectation is that the rails will be laid, 
and the line completed into Vancouver 
from the Fraser before the New West- 
minster bridge across the river is eom- 
uleted. The work oh the latter is pro- 
gressing well and is expected to be fin- 
ished in less than three months. 

Vancouver, B.C., Dec. 24, 1903. 



THE GROWTH OF A FILE BUSINESS 

FOR many years up to 1880 old Eng- 
land supplied nearly all files and 
rasps used in Canada ; shortly af- 
ter that year American manufacturers 
sought this market with their increment- 
cut machine made files and gradually 
succeeded in replacing the English hand- 
made files, on account of the quality and 



: 



3 Popular Goods for 
Vogressive People. 

SUITED TO ALL CLASSES OF BUILDINGS— NOT TO BE 
EQUALLED FOR PRACTICAL MERIT AND ENDURING 
RELIABILITY. 

Our Metallic 
Ceilings and Walls 

Give the acme of satisfaction at moderate cost. 

They please the most aesthetic as well as practical tastes 
Artistically beautiful, almost indestructible, sanitary, easily 

applied, with countless designs to select among. 

THERE'S BIG BUSINESS FOB YOU IN HANDLING THESE GOODS. 

The Metallic Roofing Co., Limited 



TORONTO 



MONTREAL 



WINNIPEG 



price. Several file factories have been 
in operation in different parts of the 
Dominion, but for want of experience 
and the capital necessary to enable them 
to produce a first-class article, none of 
these factories succeeded (with one ex- 
ception). 

In September, 1901, the Nicholson File 
Co., of Providence, R.I., the largest file 
manufacturers in the world, whose daily 
production in their six factories exceeds 
10,000 dozen, were induced to come to 
Canada and purchase the plant of the 
Globe File Co., Port Hope, Ont. Short- 
ly after taking possession of these works 
they commenced remodelling the build- 
ings, and during t he past year have 
equipped these works in every depart- 
ment with the most modern machinery 
necessary to enable them to produce 
tiles and rasps, equal in every respect to 
the celebrated Nicholson increment 
brand made at their Providence works. 
They have also brought in from their 
other factories experts necessary for 
each branch of the business and as a 
consequence they are now producing 
daily at these works GOO dozen files and 
rasps in the different sizes, shapes, and 
cuts, required to meet the wants of the 
various industries located in the differ- 
ent parts of the Dominion, which has 
enabled them to secure a large share 
of the file business of the Dominion. 

An experience of over 35 years has 

placed the Nicholson File Co. in a front 

rank in this line of business, as during 

that time they have given their undi- 

25 



Tided attention to the manufacture of 
files (files only) and to this may be at- 
tributed their success. 

During the past five years they have 
had a very large trade in Great Britain, 
more particularly for their " Nichol- 
son " and " Kearney & Foot " brands, 
and should England adopt a tariff giv- 
ing her colonies a preference, the Nichol- 
son File Co. would be prepared to sup- 
ply their English customers from their 
Dominion factory. They have invested 
a large amount of money in Canada, and 
have great confidence in the future 
growth of our Dominion. 

The sale of English made files now is 
not large in Canada, although they have 
a preference of 10 per cent, as against 
the United States or Germany. In 1865 
England exported a large quantity of 
files to the United States, but shortly 
after the war manufacturers- started to 
spring up in the latter country and thev 
gradually, but surely drove the English 
article out of their market with the as- 
sistance of a high tariff (which tariff 
still exists). Competition among them- 
selves became very keen. Now they sell 
their goods in Great Britain and other 
parts of Europe. The Nicholson File 
€o. have expended a large amount of 
money to enable them to produce a 
sufficient quantity of goods to meet the 
demand of this growing country for the 
next 10 years. They give employment 
to about 125 hands and naturally the 
town of Port Hope has benefited by hav- 
ing such an industry in their midst. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BEARDSHAW'S SORBITIC STEEL. 

IN our issue of October 17, 1903, refer- 
ence was made to some experiments 
in steel which are being made by 
the Baltic Steel Works, of Sheffield, 
England, with the object of increasing 
its tensile strength. While in Canada 
a few months ago, Mr. W. F. Beardshaw, 
a representative of the company, suc- 
ceeded in interesting the railways in the 
results of these experiments which, as 
we stated before, were first made at the 
suggestion of the War Office which re- 
quired steel of extra tensile strength 
for the light artillery. Considerable 
success has attended these efforts as is 
evidenced by the following extract from 
Engineering, to which our attention has 
been called by Mr. Alexander Gibb, of 
13 St. John street, Montreal, the Can- 
adian representative of the company: 

' ' We illustrate below a specimen of 
the " sorbitic steel ' made by Messrs. J. 
Beardshaw & Son, Limited, of the Baltic 




Steel Works, Sheffield, which possesses 
most remarkable and valuable physical 
properties. The specimen shown was 
cut from a 5 1-2-inch bar, and was orig- 
inally 11-2 inches square. It has, as 
our illustration shows, been bent double, 
and though it has been flattened a little 
in the process, I here is not the sign of 
a crack anywhere about it, even al- 
though the edges of the specimen were 
left dead sharp, in place of being round- 
ed off, as is commonly done, before mak- 
ing a bending test of steel. The makers 
hiform us that in its original state the 
bar from which this specimen was cut 
had a breaking strength of 35 tons, an 
elastic limit of 18 tons, and an exten- 
sion of 29 per cent, in 2 inches. It was 
then subjected to the firm's special heat 
treatment, which has conferred on it 
the remarkable toughness indicated 
in our illustration; and on mak- 
ing new tensile tests, it was found 



that its strength had been raised 
to 48 tons, and the elactic limit to 38 
tons, whilst the extension on 2 inches 
was 23 per cent., and the reduction of 
area on fracture 47 1-2 per cent. A steel 
of this kind should prove most valuable 
for very many purposes where lightness 
and strength are required in combina- 
tion. It is not in any way a hard steel, 
and can be cut and filed easily. Possibly 
even these steels may at a later date find 
application to structural purposes. Its 
makers even now can supply it in fairly 
large sizes, and they claim that they 
can readily attain even greater strength 
and toughness if such is required by 
their customers." 




ONTARIO. 

THE pattern-house and office of The 
J. Inglis Co., manufacturers of 
engines and boilers, Toronto, have 
been destroyed by fire. Loss covered by 
insurance. 

The business of The Wakefield Mica Co., 
Ottawa, is being liquidated. 

J. Lanthier. general merchant. Wen 
daker, has assigned to W. A. Cole. 

J. W. Watson, general merchant, Min- 
den, has advertised his business for sale. 

Brarnin Bros., millers and brickmakers, 
Berlin, have advertised their brick plant 
for sale. 

J. Henderson, hardware merchant, Col- 
lingwood. is advertising his business for 
sale by tender. 

The Canada Cabinet Co., manufactur 
e.rs . of office files, Gananoque, have been 
damaged by fire. 

Adams Bros., wholesale and retail sad- 
dlers and hardware merchants, Toronto, 
'have been damaged by fire. 

Watt Bros., machinists, Gananoque, 
have been damaged by fire and water ; 
loss partly covered by insurance. 

D. Aitchison & Co.'s lumber and plan- 
ing mill, Hamilton, lias been damaged 
by fire ; loss partly covered by insurance. 

T. Houard, of T. Houard & Son, con- 
tractors, Toronto. have assigned to 
R. It. C. Clarkson. A meeting of credi- 
tors was announced for 29th itist. 

QUEBEC. 

L. D. Vezina. joiner, Quebec, has regis- 
tered. 

J. A. Pare, general merchant, Lachine, 
is dead. 



F. Brunet, plumber. Montreal, lias 
registered. 

The Dominion Bag Co., Montreal, have 
been damaged by fire. 

The Bishop Engraving & Printing Co., 
Montreal, have sold out. 

The Dominion Pneumatic Tool Co., 
Montreal, have registered. 

The Bark River Lumber Mill. St. Alexis 
des Monts, have registered. 

Lefrancois & Laqueux, wood and coal 
dealers, Quebec,- have registered. 

H. Girard, general merchant, St. Paul's 
Ray, has effected a compromise. 

The assets of Price Bros., general mer- 
chants, Iberville, have been sold. 

The Montreal Waste Paper Co., junk 
dealers, Montreal, have registered. 

Cole & Cameron, wholesale paper deal 
ers, Montreal, have dissolved partnership. 

The assets of A. D. Spear, general mer- 
chant, St. Adolphe de Houard. have been 
sold. 

W. Curry, of W. & F. P. Curry & Co.. 
wholesale general merchants. Montreal, 
is dead. 

Levine Bros., general merchants and 
fish dealers, Fox River, have com- 
promised. 

N. H. Turcotte. general merchant, St. 
Rulalie. is offering to compromise at 45c. 
on the dollar. 

P. Licard, plumber, Montreal, has as 
signed ; meeting of creditors announced 
for 31st inst. 

Wilks & Michaud have been appointed 
curators to J. 0. Lemire & Co., general 
merchants, St. Guillaume d'Upton. 

J- Belisle & Frere, general merchants. 
St. Stanislas de Champlain, have made 
an assignment. Their assets have been 
sold. 

MANITOBA AND N.W.T. 

Bell Bros., general merchants, Regina, 
have been succeeded in business by A . 
Bell. 

NOVA SCOTIA. 

Consent has been registered for M. 0. 
Kirkpatrick, general merchant. Diligent 
River, to do business in her own name. 

NEW BRUNSWICK) 

R. R. Call, coal dealer. Newcastle, is 
dead. 

•J. T. Jordan, proprietor of a saw mill. 
Lower Queensburg, has made an assign 
ment. Meeting of creditors to be held 
January 4. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

W. Powers' sawmill, Midway, has been 
damaged by fire. Loss partially covered 
by insurance. 



:w 



The Pittsburg Metal Market. 

From The Iron Trade Review, December 24, 1903. 

Pig Iron.— The Northern pig iron 
market is a trifle weaker this week than 
last and No. 2 foundry for spot ship- 
ment has sold as low as $13.85, Pitts- 
burg, while most brands are held at 
$14, with a few quoted at $14.25. There 
has been very little doing, the radiator 
buying for delivery the first quatrer of 
foundries east of here doing the most 
next year at prices equivalent to $14.25, 
Pittsburg. The amount aggregates about 
3,000 tons. There have been further 
sales of Northern forge iron amounting 
to about 5,000 tons at prices ranging 
from $13 to $13.50, Pittsburg. Bessemer 
iron is also weaker and is quoted at 
$13.25 to $13.50 at the furance, while 
basic has sold at $12.90 at valley furn- 
ace. Southern operators are firmer, 
holding at a minimum of $9.50, Birm- 
ingham, for No. 2, while forge is quoted 
at $8.25, Birmingham. For delivery the 
first quarter as high as $10, Birming- 
ham, is asked by some furnaces. The 
feeling in the South, judging from these 
prices, is more confident than that pre- 
vailing among the furnacemen in the 
North. 

Bars— There is no buying of either 
iron or steel bars to cover more than im- 
mediate requirements. Quotations on 
steel bars are being well maintained but 
on iron bars 1.25c. Youngstown is being 
done on desirable tonnages. We make 
the following quotations: Bessemer steel 
bars, 1.30c; open-hearth, 1.40c; plow 
beams and cultivator beams, 1.30c net; 
channels, angles, zees and tees, Besse- 
mer, under 3 inches, 1.40c; common bar 
iron, 1.30c to 1.35c, Pittsburg. The 
following differentials are maintained 
on steel: Less than 2,000 pounds of a 
size and not less than 1,000 pounds, 10 
cents advance; less than 1,000 pounds 
of a size, 30 cents advance. Hoops are 
quoted at 1.65c, full extras, in 250-ton 
lots and over, and 1.75c in less than 
250-ton lots. Bands are quoted at 1.30c 
and take the bar extras. 

Pipes and Tubes— A revised list of 
discounts on both iron and steel boiler 
tubes has been issued by the largest 
manufacturer. It carries a reduction 
on all sizes averaging about 10 per cent. 
A revision of the pipe list is looked for 
by consumers and no doubt will reach 
the trade by the first of the year. The 
pipe market generally continues quiet. 
We quote carload lots to consumers, f.o. 



HARDWAR.B and metal 

b. Pittsburg, plus freight according to 
Tube Rate Book to destination: 

MERCHANT PIPE. 

Steel Pipe. Wrought Iron Pipe 

Blaok. Ualv. Black. Gait. 

p. e. p. c. p. c. p. c. 

i. J an,l i inch 68 58 65 

| inch 70 60 67 57 

! to 6 inch 75 65 72 62 

7 to 12 inch 69 59 66 56 

Plugged and Reamed 

1 to 4 inch 73 63 70 60 

Extra strong plain end 

i to 8 inch 67 57 63 53 

Threads only 66 56 62 52 

Threads and couplings 65 55 61 51 

Double extra strong plain end 

J to 8 inch 59 49 55 45 

Threads only 58 48 54 44 

Threads and couplings 57 47 53 43 

Note.— Orders for less than carload will be charged at 12'. 
per cent, advance. Extra and double extra strong cut 

lengths, lower random discounts by 10 per cent, nel toi 6 
feet, iiinl longer, and 15 per cent, net for 3 to 6 feet. 

Wire and Wire Nails— A fair amount 
of business continues to be done despite 
the Winter season. Demand for cut 
nails has fallen off heavily, however. 
Concessions continue to be made and 
average as high as $4 to some delivered 
points. We quote as follows: Wire 
nails, carload lots, to jobbers, f.o.b. cars 
Pittsburg, $1.85 to $1.90; plain wire, 
carload lots, $1.75 to $1.80; barb wire, 
carload lots, $2.15 to $2.20; staples, car- 
load lots, $2.05 to $2.10. Galvanizing, 
30 cents extra. Carload lots to retail- 
ers are held at 5 cents advance in all 
lines, and on less than carload lots a 
further advance of 10 cents is charged. 
Steel cut nails are quoted as follows: 
Carload lots, $1.90 and less than carload 
lots, $1.95, f.o.b. Pittsburg, plus freight 
to point of destination. Iron cut nails 
are $1.90 in carload lots and $1.95 in 
less than carload lots. Terms, 60 days 
less 2 per cent, off in 10 days. 

Coke— Furnace coke for spot ship- 
ment is now being sold on the basis of 
$1.60 at the ovens, while strictly Con- 
nellsville foundry coke is quoted at $2 
to $2.25. For delivery through the first 
half of the year furnace coke is quoted 
at $1.50 to $1.65 and foundry at $1.90 
to $2.15. These quotations apply to 
strictly high grade Connellsville coke. 
However, a few of the operators in the 
region will not entertain any such prices 
and ask $2.25 and in some cases as high 
as $2.40 for foundry coke. For the week 
ending Saturday, December 12, the out- 
put of the upper region amounted to 
113,306 tons and that of the lower re- 
gion 41,859 tons. About 13,000 ovens 
are idle in both regions. 



agreement reached by them was that 
December 1 was about the right time. 
This gave them a chance to mark off all 
their goods and place things in proper 
shape before the rush commenced. Sev- 
eral travellers were (if the same opin- 
ion and felt that no more business was 
done by the travellers after December 1 
than could hav been done previous to 
that date. They had to " fill in " a 
week or two more time on the mail, 
however, merely because others were 
doing so.. 

Several merchants have made it a 
strict rule not to see travellers after 
December 1 until new year starts again, 
There is no reason why this could not 
be arranged with all the leading houses 
and their travelling staffs and give the 
merchants and their clerks a chance to 
make holiday displays and arrange their 
stocks and stores ready for purchasers. 
Perhaps some other merchants and trav- 
ellers can give their views on the ques- 
tion. 

TRAVELLER. 

Montreal, December 24, 1903. 



TRAVELLERS IN HOLIDAY SEASON 

Editor " Hardware and Metal ": 

Several merchants got into an inter- 
esting discussion the other day as to 
what was the best time to withdraw 
travellers for the holiday season. The 
37 



THE VALUE OF THE PREFER- 
ENCE. 

AN excellent illustration of the value 
of the Canadian preference to 
British manufacturers has been 
given in the award this week of the con- 
tract for 6,000 gross tons of 80-lb. steel 
rails to Chas. Cammell & Co., of Shef- 
field, Eng., through their agent in Can- 
ada, the estate of the late James Cooper, 
Montreal. 

The quotations of the United States 
Steel Corporation were slightly lower 
than those of their British competitors, 
but thejiifference in the duty effected by 
the preference was sufficient to make the 
British quotation the more favorable, so 
the order goes to Sheffield. 

A saving of $24,000 over the prices on 
the last contract is effected on this order, 
which represents the balance of rails 
required to complete the track-laying to 
the present northern terminus of the 
railway, which is New Liskeard, a dist- 
ance by the railway of 112 miles from 
North Bay. Rails are now laid to the 
57th mile, and the service is being con- 
ducted by the contractor to the end of 
the rails, where connection is made over 
a Winter road with Haileybury and New 
Liskeard. Tenders have been invited 
for the rail fastenings, which will prob- 
ably be furnished by a Canadian concern. 



Hardware and 
Metal 



STOVES AND TINWARE 




THE THOS DAVIDSON CO. DINNER. 

THE Seventh Annual Banquet, ten- 
dered by the president and directors 
_ of The Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., 
Montreal, to the travellers and heads of 
departments, Wednesday evening, 23rd 
hist., was an unqualified success, eclipsing 
all previous records. 

The function was held at the club 
rooms of the employes on Vinet street. 
These premises consist of a three-storey 
building, which the directors have gen- 
erously placed at the disposal of their 
staff. The rooms are open through the 
day for the serving of meals to em- 
ployes at cost. A plentiful supply of 
magazines is always in evidence, and a 
piano, lately installed, has helped many 
to pass a very pleasant and profitable 
evening. The president of the company, 
James Davidson, acted as chairman, and 
proposed the health of "His Majesty the 
King." which was immediately followed 
by the National Anthem. Telegrams and 
letters were read from several who were 
unavoidably absent. 

E. Goodwill, in proposing the toast of 
"The Travellers,'* referred to the recent 
additions to the staff, and made feeling 
reference to the removal by death of one 
of their number during the year. 

W. H. Morgan replied on behalf of the 
"Knights of the Grip'' in a speech bristl- 
ing with patriotism — the theme "Canada 
for the Canadians" being enlarged upon 
in a very eloquent and instructive man- 
ner. 

T. Chas. Davidson, in a humorous 
speech, proposed the health of "Heads of 
Departments," coupled with the names of 
• I. Williams, superintendent of factory, 
aud Wm. Jones and .los. Bodfish, also 
Dr. A. W. Haldimand, physician for the 
employes, and W. .1. White, K.C., the at- 
torney of the firm. The ready wit of the 
latter gentleman was much appreciated. 
The toast of "The Ladies" was pro- 
posed by C. F. Shearer and replied to 
by W. C. Huff. 

"The Absentees" was the toast pro- 
posed by Mr. Chadburn, particularly 
mentioning -I. Taylor Webb, a traveller 
of long standing, who is representing the 
firm in Manitoba and British Columbia. 
"Canada" was proposed by •). N. 
Young, who quoted statistics to show 
that the increase in volume of Canadian 
trade during the last five years had been 
more than one-third greater titan that of 
any other civilized country on the face 
of tin; o-lobe. This toast was enthusiasti- 



cally honored and accompanied by the 
singing of the "Maple Leaf." Mr. La- 
chapelle made an able reply (in French). 

J. N. Warminton, in a few well-chosen 
remarks, proposed the health of the 
"President and Directors." responded to 
by James Davidson. The presence at the 
banquet of A. Sauvageau and A. 0. Gee, 
both of whom have been connected with 
the firm for over 30 years, is a practical 
proof of the good feeling which has al- 
ways existed between employers and em- 
ployes. 

Mr. Gee and Mr. Bindley made a few 
remarks, touching on their long associa- 
tion with the company. J. Chalmers 
(the artist of the establishment) who de- 
signed the invitations and the menu 
cards (which were lithographed on tin), 
recited an original poem of his own 
composition, bringing in many local hits. 
which were much enjoyed. We enclose 
copy of poem. 

TIN TYPES. 
To make a speech is not so hard 
For those of ready tongues ; 
To sing a song is not so ha' d 
For those of powerful lungs. 
As I's possessed of neither, 
It's not so hard to understand 
Why I can't speak like Morgan, 
Or sing like Haldimand. 
Though lacking these two qualities, 
There's a third by me possessed, 
I'm a connoisseur, a critic 
Of all that is the best. 

Now, the T. D. Co., we all well know, 
We are here at their request. 
With me you'll agree, the directors three. 
Initials J. D., T. C. D. and E. G., 
Stand good for what 'er they attest 
To this fact we're not blind, 
They ate three of a kind, 
Thiee of the very best. 

Their enamelled quartette, known near and far, 
As "Crescent," " Colonial," " Premier" and 

" Star," 
By good cooks are always possessed. 
Their goods are the standard all over this land, 
Whetherlithographed, pressed, pieced or japanned, 
They're better than anyone's best. 

Our manager's next, a man full of zeal, 

He has no time for theory, he believes in the real, 

And from labor he's seldom at rest ; 

If you do your work right he'll not trouble you, 

That's why I tell you that J. W. 

Is one of the very best. 

Our travellers next, hail fellows well met, 
They do not give orders, but take all they get. 
From the north, from the south, east or west, 
While on the train they tell rude tales. 
But on the road they make good sales, 
And at that you can bet they are best. 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEflENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading. 2c. a word first 
insertion; le a word each subsequent insertion. 

Contractions count as one word, but five figures (as 
81.000) are allowed as one word. 

Cash remittance to cover cost must accompany all 
advertisements. In nocasecanthisrulebeoverlook- 
ed. Advertisements received without remittance 
cannot be acknowledged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, five 
cents must be added to cost to cover postage, etc. 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 



WANTED — Hardware Clerk ; steady employ- 
ment to good man ; state ape, experience, 
and salarv expected. The Western Hardware Co. , 
Regina, Assa. (i) 

WANTED — Immediately — First-class horse- 
shoers ; steady job to good, steady man ; 
good wages. Apply to Wm. Farr & Son, Sarnia, 
Ont. (f) 

PATTERNMAKERS — Two first-class marine 
engine patternmakers. Apply The Colling- 
wood shipbuilding Co., Limited, Collingwood, 
Ont. (f) 



SITUATIONS WANTED. 

\A/ANTED — Experienced Traveller wants posi- 
' * tion calling upon hardware trade in Eastern 
Ontario, or manager of retail hardware store. Ad- 
dress Box 240, Gananoque, Ont. (1) 



BY a young man with 20 years' experience in the 
hardware business, a position of traveller or 
in the warehouse ; best of reference as to sobriety 
and ability. Address Z., 73 James street, 
Ottawa. (3) 

ARTICLES WANTED, 

ALWAYS in the market for lead and copper con- 
centrates ; advise particulars. Syracuse 1 
Smelting Works, Montreal. (2) 



FOR SALE. 

Sale of stock of hardware and shop supplies by tender. 
The extensive and old-established business of J. Hender- 
son in Town of Collingwood. Owner retiring. 

Collingwood is one of the most flourishing and progressive 
Towns in Canada and lias brightest outlook for the future. It 
has largest and most up-to-date dry dock and shipbuiling 
plant on the Upper Lakes where largest vessels are built and 
repaired. It has also large saw mills, export meat-packing 
plant, flour mill, grain elevator, planing mills, tannery, 
foundry, etc., which give employment to a large number 
of hands. It has also near completion large steel manu- 
facturing plant and rolling mills, wire mills, nail factoi-y aud 
furniture factory. It is headqarters of large line of steam- 
boats which give it connection with all points on (he lakes. 
Harbor is now crowded with steamboats which will fit out 
there in Spring. It is a terminal of Grand Trunk Railway 
and also an objective point of railways now under construc- 
tion and projected. Written tenders for above stock will be 
received up to the 15th day of January, 1904 by the under- 
signed, from whom conditions and terms of tender and other 
information can be obtained on application. 
Building for sale J. HENDERSON, 

or rent. Hardware Merchant, Collingwood 



Welland Canal. 

Tenders for supplies for the year 1904. 

SEALED TENDERS for supplies, addressed to the 
Superintending Engineer, Welland Canal, St. Catharines, 

will be received until 20 o'clock on Tuesday, the 12th of Jan- 
uary, 1904. for the supply anil deliver; of various articles of 
Timber. Hardware, Castings, Fuel, Paints, Oils, etc., for use 
on the Welland Canal and its branches for the year 1904. 

Specifications, forms of tender aud other information may 
be obtained at the Superintending Engineer's office St. 
Catharines, on and after Monday, the 21st December, 
1903. 
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted. 
By order, 

L. K. JONES, 

Seer, 
Department of Railways and Canals, 
Ottawa, December 19th. 1903 



38 



STOVES AMI) TINWARE H.rdw.re ««<. 

Metal 



¥ 

¥ 



¥ 
¥ 



* 



j\ Happy New Year ! 

In this commercial age, man's happiness depends greatly on how busi nesss 
going. You will have a prosperous and happy 1904 if you supply your custom- 
ers with the 

Imperial Oxford Range. 

It makes satisfied customers and that is the kind of customers you want. 
Write us about it. 



TKe Gurney Foundry Company, Limited. 

Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver 

The Gurney-Massey Company, Limited, 

Montreal. 



¥ 
¥ 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 



% Greetings 

¥ 

¥ 

¥ Wishing pou all 

¥ 

I B Wevp Tbappp and prosperous 1904. 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 

I TiTe THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited jj 

¥ MONTREAL. \ 



¥ : 

¥ P 
¥ 

¥ l 

¥ . 

¥ - 

¥ " 

¥ M 

¥ R 



¥ 

¥ 



39 



Hardware «nd 

M«t.l 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



The heads of the departments, a secret I'll unfold 

ye, 
My twenty-one year old friend, Charley Shearer, 

has just told me, 
And I give my word of honor it's no jest, 
From January to December, 
He cannot once remember, 
When you didn't try to do your very best. 

Now, those whom I have mentioned in quality are 

first, 
There are others, self included, known as 

"seconds,' 1 not the worst, 
In truth I know we'ie just as good's the rest. 
Although not of the same stock, 
We have all to punch the clock, 
And at that I know a Xo. 2 is best. 

Jay See. 

Others who contributed with songs and 
recitations, included W. J. White, K.C.; 
Dr. Haldimand, C. J. Cartledge, ('. 1'. 
Clark. M. Lachapelle, J. Toupin, J. W. 
Strachan and W. E. Barrat. 

The singing of "Auld Lang Syne'' fol- 
lowed by the National Anthom brought a 
very successful evening to a close. 

Canadian Iron at Manchester. 

THE Manchester correspondent of 
the Ironmonger includes the fol- 
lowing references to Canadian 
iron and steel in the last market report 
to hand, December 12: Canadian iron 
has become a serious competitor here, 
and the knowledge that this is the case 
is forcing on the market iron held in 
second hands at almost any price that 
can be got, whilst for delivery forward 
exceedingly low quotations are named. 
. Linconshire pig-iron makers at their 
usual fortnightly meeting last week de- 
cided upon a further reduction in their 
list-basis rates of Is. per ton on No. 3 
. foundry and of 6d. per ton on forge 
qualities, and an unusual feature ahoul 
the reduction is that No. 3 foundry, No. 
4 forge, and mottled and white irons 
are all now quoted on the same basis. 
Lancashire makers nominally have made 
no change, but Derbyshire iron is, if 
anything, a trifle easier, although not 
actually quoted lower. Forge qualities, 
delivered Warrington, are quoted 6d. 
below last week's rates, but Canadian 
brands of forge iron are being offered 
at 47s.. and could in all probability be 
bought still lower'if' offers fur any quan- 
tities were forthcoming. Middlesborough 
iron lias eased down from (id. to Is. pet- 
ton on recent quotations. Scotch iron is 
also easier, and both Eglinton and Glen 
garnock are to be bought at low (and 
practically at identical) figures, which in 
the ease of Glengarnock are 2s. below 
what makers are quoting. Canadian and 
American foundry iron continues to he 
offered for delivery in this district, and 
sellers of the respective brands are com- 



peting keenly to secure orders. Heavy 
shipments of Canadian iron have already 
been arranged to this country, and large 
quantities of United States iron will 
probably come over as stiffening in cot- 
ton ships Competition continues 

keen in billets, but low prices fail to 
bring forward any large weight of buy- 
ing. American and Canadian billets 
can be readily bought at 41. delivered in 
this district, and something under this 
figure would probably be conceded if 
anything like good offers were put for- 
ward. German billets remain at about 
41. 4s. c.i.f. for 4-inch and upwards, and 
41. 5s. for 2-inch and upwards, with 
English prices somewhat irregular, but 
nominallv unchanged. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. W. Williams, formerly secretary 
of the Laurie Engine Company, return- 
ed to Montreal last week after a month 's 
business visit to England. We under- 
stand that Mr. Williams has secured sev- 
eral good agencies for English manufac- 
turing firms, among them being John 
Birch & Co., Limited, London. 

Mr. Thomas Wright, representative 
of H; S. Howland, Sons & Co., Toronto, 
in Manitoba, is on a visit to his home in 
Toronto and vicinity. Like most travel- 
lers covering the West Mr. Wright bears 
evidence of good treatment there hav- 
ing put on weight as well as dignity 
since his last visit to the East. 

Mr. F. 0. Lewis, of Lewis Bros. & Co.. 
Montreal, president of the Canadian 
Wholesale Hardware Association, re- 
turned to Montreal on Christmas eve. 
after a flying visit to England. Mr. 
Lewis was in London for a week in con- 
nection with business affairs. He re- 
ports English trade conditions very dull. 

Mr. A. H. Brittain, who has been for 
some time travelling representative for 
Mr. Walter Grose, manufacturers' agent, 
of Montreal, has severed his connection 
with his old employer and is now in 
business on his own account. Mr. Brit- 
tain is now agent for Black Bros. & Co., 
of Halifax, and his territory includes 
the two Provinces of Ontario and Que- 
bec. Mr. Brittain 's friends will regret 
his transition from hardware to codfish 
but they will joint with " Hardware and 
Metal " in wishing hint every success 
in his new business venture. 

Mr. Ralph Chamberlain, who succeeds 
Mr. A. H. Brittain as travelling repre- 
sentative for Mr. Walter Grose, manu- 
facturers' agent, of Montreal, is an 
Englishman of the right type, and ready 
to adapt himself to conditions in the 
country of his adoption. He has had 
seven years' experience in the hardware 
business in the city of London and since 
he arrived in this country a few months 
ago he has been in the employ of Caver- 
hill, Learmont & Co.. of Montreal. Mr. 
Chamberlain will visit the important 
cities and towns of the. Dominion in the 
interests of the manufacturers whom 
Mr. Grose represents. " Hardware and 
.Metal " wishes him every success in his 
new position. 




Wire-Cone 



Incan- 
descent 



Toaster 



Only perfect Bread Toaster for Gas 
or Gasoline Stoves. No smoky taste 
to bread toasted on this toaster. 

Write for prices. 

H.O.Edy, Montreal. E.T.Wright & Co., Hamilton. 
HARKINS & WILLIS, 



Manufacturers and Inventors, 



Ann Harbok, Mich 



Apply all the tests to 

STERNE'S ASBESTOS CEMENT 

and It will fill the bill every time 
Whether for durability or economy, satisfaction to 
the user, or saleability, it never fails to meet every re- 
quirement. Wiite for samples aid prices. 

Manufactured by G. F. STERNE, Brantford. 
For Sale by : J.H. Hanson, Montreal 

Batty Stovk & Hardware Co., Toronto 




The FAIRGRIEVE GAS TOASTER 

Retails at 25c. The only Toaster guaranteed to toast on 
gas, gasoline or blue flame oil stoves without taste or smell. 
Write for prices. 

THE FAIRGRIEVE MAN'FG. CO.. 

295 COLLEGE ST., TORONTO. 
(I. S. Branch: 289 Jefferson Ave.. DETROIT. 



Never Drip a Drop 

THENEWTEA STRAINER 

Meets a popular need. A side line you 
y*&^ cannot afford to be- without. R»-tuils at 
jF 10 cents. 

FITS ANY imperial Tea Strainer Co., 

TEA POT MONTREAL. 

DO VOl SELL GOLD PAINT ? 

Write us for particulars of 

"Sunrise" Gold Enamel | Best in 
"Aurora" Gold Paint f the market. 

GEO. RIDOUT & CO., 77 York St., Toronto. 





40 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



Hardware and 
Metal 



Have you 
tried it ? 

Tried what ? 




This is in your line of business, and it will 
pay you. 

The Batty Stove & Hardware Go 

76 YORK ST., TORONTO. 




J. M. MAST MFG. CO.'S 

RAT and MOUSE TRAPS 

Strongest Traps Made. 

Prices Exactly Right. 

CANADIAN AGENTS 

Edwin H. Grenfell & Co., London, Ont. 




I 



THE PRICE 

is dead right, and so is the stove. A 
wood-saver, a wonderful heat-pro- 
ducer; fireproof construction. Burns 
wood that ordinarily has been looked 
upon as waste. Top draft and air 
tight. Users are eloquent with its 
praises. 

Send for booklet. We advise early action. 
The agency is too good to lose. 

TELEPHONE CITY STOVES, Limited 

BRANTfORD, Canada. 



means perfection in 

the manufacture of 



ROME 

Nickled-Plated Copperware 

A FULL LINE ALWAYS CARRIED IN STOCK IN WINNIPEG 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE, OR BETTER STILL, SEND US A SAMPLE ORDER. 

Coltart & Oameron 



Special attention given to 
warehousing and distributing 
cars. 



Manufacturers' Agents and Warehousemen, 

141-143 Bannatyne Avenue, WINNIPEG. 



THE ADAMS STOVE PIPE REGISTER. 



Design Patented 
June 29, 1897. 

Design Patented 
August 31, 1897. 

Made by 




The Adams 
Company 

Dubuque, 
Iowa, U.S.A. 




The original and only Cenuine 
preparation for Cleaning Cutlery 
6d. and is Canisters. 



OAKEY'S 

• WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England 

Agent: 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MOVTRBAL 



Manufacturers' 



rp Hardware and 

lO Metal has in- 

quiries from time 
to time from 
manufacturers 
A (rptlfc an d others want- 

A^BIIIS j n g representat- 

ives in the leading business centres here 
and abroad. 

Firms or individuals open for agencies 
in Canada or abroad may have their 
names and addresses placed on a special 
list kept for the information of inquirers 
in our variousoffices throughout Canada 
and in Great Britain without charge. 
Address 

Business Manager 

Hardware and Metal 
Montreal and Toronto 



NOTT TUBE SKATES 




O^' 



<**•. 



THE. STRONGEST, LIGHTEST. 

NEATEST TUBULAR SKATE 

MADE. 

■!■ ADAPTED FOR— — ^i» 

Pleasure, Hockey or Racing. 

25°/» Lighter, I00°/ B Stronger than other tube 
Skates. 

Built like a bicycle with bicycle con- 
nections. The only skate with Reinforced 
Lugs, brazed into the main tube and 
cones making it impossible to pull them 
apart. Guaranteed not to break. 

WRITE FOR AGENCY. 

W. G. NOTT & CO. 

205i Yonge St.^^- 

TORONTO, CAN. 



41 



Hardware and 
Metal 



Window and Interior Displays 



THE most frequent excuse made 
by the merchant who neglects 
his window is that he has no 
time. Few in this day dare 
say that they do not think a 
well-dressed window sells goods. They 
would not risk setting up their opinion 
against that of the ninety-nine out of a 
hundred who insist upon the expenditure 
of much time and money on the display of 
goods seen by passersby. But they will 
hide behind the excuse that the time con- 
sumed is more than can be afforded in the 
store, implying by this that business is so 
brisk that the entire attention of 
the staff is necessary to wait on the 
customers. 

Ask the same merchant how he 
would meet the contingency of an 
overflow of customers, and he would 
say that he would engage more 
clerks. And yet, although he will 
admit that in some cases at least, 
the tasty display of an article will 
sell it, he often cannot see that the 
employment of one more clerk for 
window dressing would mean a 
larger business. He is loath to 
add to his present staff, simply be- 
cause, for the few additional dollars a 
week he would have to pay, there 
would not appear any direct, im- 
mediate return. An extra clerk is 
much more profitable when em- 
ployed as a window-dresser than if 
he were engaged solely as a sales- 
man. 

But this cry is in almost every 
case made without thought. There 
are many minutes during the day 
which are idled away by all the 
clerks. These, if set apart for one 
clerk to be spent in decorating the win- 
dow, would mean no additional help, and 
procure all the beneficial results of an at- 
tractive store. " I haven't time" is very 
often equivalent to "I have not the am- 
bition to make time." Those time-con- 
suming displays that cost much money in 
addition, are not a necessary part of the 
window plans. An excellent display can 
be arranged in far less time than is 
wasted every day in almost every store, 
and after a clerk gets experience, the 
time spent grows less and less. The 
plans should be thought of during the 
regular business or out of hours, and the 



Timely Hints 
and Suggestions 



arrangement can then be quickly worked 
out. If the merchant who "hasn't" time 
would make time, he would come to an 
appreciation of the value of good displays 
that would make them as important as 
any other branch of the business. 

This Week's Illustration. 
The articles in a hardware store are of 
such a varied nature that they admit of 
being used in the building up of figures 
and other# schemes. Some time ago a 
drawing of a horse, driver and wagon, 
composed wholly of hardware articles, 




Head of King Edward — Built by Jos. W. Noyes for 
Geo. Allen, Burlington, Ont. 



was shown. The accompanying illustra- 
tion shows the head of King Edward, as 
constructed by Mr. Jos. W. Noyes for 
Geo. Allen's hardware store in Burlington, 
Ont. 

The appearance is a striking likeness, 
and is decidedly clever in this way, as 
well as in the use of the different articles. 
The outline was first drawn on a black 
cloth stretched over a board background, 
four by four feet, the hardware being 
tacked on the outline. The hair is com- 
posed of staples, knives and scissors, the 
ear of calipers and awls, the beard of No. 
Hi steel jack chain, the forehead of a 
42 



caliper and bit, the eyes and eyebrows of 
calipers, one-half inch washers and No. 42 
chair nails, the nose of nails and a screw 
hook, the collar of No. 32 caliper rules, 
the star and epaulets of brass jack chain, 
the shoulder of a rule, a skate key, a 
safety-pin, bits and other articles, and 
the badges of paint colors. 

Dozens of changes could be made, but 
very few that would have been an im- 
provement. The curves are faithfully 
worked opt, a couple of the best touches 
being in the screw hook for the nose, the 
chain for the beard and the staples for the' 
front part of the hair. The usua 
style of figures constructed after 
this plan are crude, although pos- 
sibly quite cleverly made. In this 
picture, however, anyone can readily 
see the likeness. 

Mr. Noyes says that the figure 
drew crowds from the City of 
Hamilton, which is close by, and 
from the surrounding country, and 
proved a profitable advertisement 
for the store. Such a display has 
all the advantages of a picture win- 
dow, combined with the selling 
qualities of a display of articles 
carried in stock. The spectator is 
also induced to stop and look closely 
at the make-up of the head in order 
to see what is used in the different 
parts. The construction would take 
considerable time, but it could be 
built out of the window during 
spare moments, and there is no ex- 
pense in connection with it. 
* * * 

A new man in business almost in- 
variably has his way to make from 
the ground up. The fact even of 
his having been a resident counts for very 
little in these days of strenuous opposi- 
tion. He should, at any rate, take little 
consolation in the fact that he has known 
his neighbors, and that they are bound to 
come to him for their wants, in spite of 
competition. The trade must be largely 
won, and with the winning comes its keep- 
ing. The average buyer has little of the 
staying quality, unless continually rubbed 
the right way, and patted on the back, 
so to speak. It may go against the 
grain to do this sort of thing, yet 
it has to be almost literally done or the 
customers rapidly drift away. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



WHAT OUR 



BRANDED WIW A RED 



SPECIALLY 
SELECTED 



AND 



SUPERIOR 




WRITE FOR OUR IMPO 



Do you see the way 
superior (S) glass is known. 



ws since our 



POOR GLAS 



ate lilass" Importing 



TORONTO. 



43 



Hardware 
Metal 



»nd 




PIGMENTS FOR PAINTING METAL. 



THE various mineral and metal, ic 
paints arc almost all natural or 
artificial iron oxides. While these 
are cheap and useful in painting- rough 
wooden structures, they are sometimes 
really quite dangerous for application to 
iron work, because instead of preventing 
oxidation they are apt to further it. 
Rust is hydrasted iron oxide, and seems 
to possess the peculiar faculty of spread- 
ing from a center, in some way acting on 
adjacent iron to form additional rust ; 
moreover, the artificial metallic paints 
are frequently made from copperas and 
iron pyrites, and are apt to contain sul 
phuric acid, which is another source of 
danger to an iron surface, writes Frank 
Rathbone, in The Decorator. 

Coal tar is much used as a paint for 
the roughest class of work, both wood 
and iron, in the latter case, especially 
for cast-iron pipes, smokestacks, and 
work to be buried underground. It has 
the nature both of resin and of oil. 
Muelder. in a series of experiments, 
found that it continually decreases in 
Weight, losing from two to five per cent. 
in 87 days. It has also the disadvantage 
of "becoming exceedingly brittle by the 
action of cold, and softening at 115 do 
grecs P. Asphalt permits of somewhat 
wider range of temperature, but other- 
wise exhibits the same peculiarities. 
These substances, while they last, are 
probably the most valuable of paints. 
especially under water ; but they are un- 
fortunate in their tendency to crawl on 
the surface to which they are applied, 
finally leaving the upper portions almost 
or quite bare. This is the case even 
underground. 

In house painting (lie most important 
thing' to consider is the permanency and 
durability of the paint itself. In con- 
structive ironwork, on the contrary, the 
condition of the surface under the coat- 
ing of paint becomes highly important. 
To the superficial observer the painted 
surface may appear as perfect as the day 
it was [Hit on. yet underneath it the 
iron may be slowly, vol none the less 
surely, rusting away. In fact, it some- 
times happens that the paint itself 
proves a destructive agency for injuring 
the iron. This is, as said above, special- 
ly true of certain of the metallic paints, 
containing sulphur in a form readily oxi 



dizable to sulphuric acid, or of certain of 
the oxides, such as Venetian red, which 
are practically rust themselves, and give 
off oxygen to the iron, absorbing more 
from the outer air to replace that which 
lias been lost. It is said that a similar 
process takes place during the oxidation 
of linseed oil, which changes it to lin- 
oxin. Were all the oil, to unite with the 
pigment base to form a soap, then none 
of its oxygen could be given off to rust 
the iron. 

Red lead, from the fact that it dries up 
linseed oil almost entirely by saponifica-^ 
tion, forming a pure lead soap, and that 
there is therefore none of that oxidation 
of the oils which takes place in the pres- 
ence of pigments wholly inert, or which 
only partially combine with it, has long 
been regarded as the best possible pres- 
ervative for clean dry iron. But in order 
to be most effective, the iron must be 
perfectly clean and free from any suspi- 
cions' of rust, and absolutely dry. lied 
lead should be perfectly pure, and of the 
best and most careful preparation. That 
from any well-known corroding house 
may be depended upon for purity. 

As red lead saponifies very quickly with 
linseed oil. it must be used within a few 
days after being ground, and, moreover, 
it is rather difficult to work. Hence 
there is great temptation to the unscru- 
pulous painter to add some substance*, 
such as whiting, to 'it in order to make 
it work freer, as well as to cost less 
money for material. 

A careful reading of the foregoing will, 
we hope, render it clear that red lead 
may advantageously be used, not only 
for iron work and the priming of wood 
work as it is at present, but also for 
many other purposes, especially when the 
surface is subjected to hard wear. For 
any purpose where great durability and 
moderate cost are required, nothing prob- 
ably can exceed the virtues of red lead. 
Agricultural implements, carts, wagons, 
barrows, dust cars, in fact, vehicles in 
general that are subject to hard wear, 
can he painted and kept in good condi- 
tion more economically with red lead 
than with any other paint. The color 
need not stand in the way of the pig- 
ment being employed because, as already 
pointed out. the addition of a little 
Mack greatlj moderates the bright color. 
44 



Mander Bros. Commence. 

in our issue of December 12 reference 
was made to the establishment in Mont- 
real of a branch of Mander Bros., manu- 
facturers of varnishes and colors, of 
Wolverhampton, England. We have just 
received from this firm a copy of a circu- 
lar letter which they are sending to the 
Canadian trade. It reads as follows : 
Dear Sir, — 

We have pleasure in advising you that we have 
established our own house of business at the above 
address, where we shall keep a large stock of our 
high-class varnishes and colois. We have taken 
this step in view of the great demand in the Do- 
minion for our manufactures, and in doing so are 
in complete accord with our late esteemed agents, 
The Sherwin-Williams O. Our manager and 
traveller for this branch, G. O. Lees, will have the 
pleasure of calling upon you in due couise, when 
he hopes to be favored wi h your valued orders. 
In the meantime, any communications which you 
may send to our address, as above, shall receive 
most careful attention. 

Mander Bros. 

218 St. Paul street, Montreal. 

Paint and Oil Markets. 

MONTREAL. 

Business is in a transitory state at 
present, but January may see some new 
developments. There lias been a lair 
booking of Paris green and a large num- 
ber of inquiries have eome in. With 
the first week in January business is 
expected to be brisk. The extremely 
cold weather has hindered house paint- 
ing, but we understand that carriage 
and furniture factories are using large 
quantities. Prices throughout are un- 
changed this week. We quote : 

Ground White Lead-Best brands, Gov- 
ernment standard, $4.60 to $4.75; No. 1, 
$4.25 to $4.40; No. 2, $4 to $4.10; No. 
3, $3,671-2 to $3,771-2; No. 4, $3.30 to 
$3.40, all f.ob. Montreal. Terms, four 
months, or 3 per cent, off for cash in 30 
days. 

Dry White Lead.— $4.25 in casks, and 
in kegs $4.50. 

Dry White Zinc— Pure dry, in casks, 
61-4c; in 100-lb. kegs, 6 3-4c; No. 1, 
zinc, in casks, 5 l-4c. ; in 100-lb kegs, 
5 3-4e. 

White Zinc (ground in oil)— Pure, 25- 
lb. irons, Sc. ; No. 1, 7c; No. 2, 6c. 

Putty.— We quote: Bulk, in barrels, 
$1.50; in 25-lb. tins and irons, $1.85; 
bladded putty in barrels, $1.75. 

Orange Mineral.— Casks, 7c; 100-lb. 
kegs, 71-4c; smaller quantities, 8 l-4c 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 




Raw and Boiled 



"GUARANTEED PURE" 



MANUrACTURED BY 



Canada Linseed Oil Mills 



MONTREAL. 



LIMITED, 



BARRELS WANTED!! 



We are open to buy good sound, oak 

Linseed Oil, Turpentine, Varnish, and 
Machine Oil Barrels. 



Hardware and 

Metal 




fthiir, Corneille & Co, 



MONTREAL 



III 



nd Gelatine 



An extensive assortment, to suit all requirements. 
WILL BE PLEASED TO SUBMIT SAMPLES AND PRICES. 



MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 



"^ 



White Lead, Oils and Colors, 
Prepared Paints, Window 
Glass, Varnishes, Etc. 



SELLING AGENTS IN CANADA 



For the GENUINE 

Imperial French Green 

of JOHN LUCAS & CO., 

PHILADELPHIA. 



And CELEBRATED 

English Varnishes 

of CHAS. TURNER & SON, 

LONDON. 



Please mention HARDWARE AND Metal when writing. 





ti 



Where Worth Works 
for You. 



Doubtless the expert Painter realizes this trueism about as much as anybody in the 
world ; with him a poor, out-of-date Brush, upon which he has to spend time in winding by 
old-fashioned methods, means loss of money and inferior work to his detriment. 

BOECKH'S FLEXIBLE BRIDLED 
PAINT BRUSHES 

are the kind that are stocked by progressive Dealers, because they are demanded now by all 
progressive Painters. 

— The bridle can easily be removed and replaced ; it is not affected by water, oil or 
— paint ; it works on a pivot and keeps the bridles elastic. 



OPERATING: 

Boeckh's Toronto Factories. 
Bryan's London Factories. 
Cane's Newmarket Factories. 



UNITED FACTORIES, 



Head Office: TORONTO, ONI. 



LIMITED. 



MONTREAL BRANCH: I and 3 DeBresoles St. 



LONDON BRANCH: 71 Dundas St. 



46 



ri*rd-w»r« and 

Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Red Leads.— Genuine red lead, in 
casks, $4.25; in 100-lb. kegs, $4.50; in 
less quantities, $5.50 per 100 lb. No. 1 
red lead, casks $3 ; kegs, $4.25, and smal- 
ler quantities, $5.25. 

Litharge.— Ground, casks, 5c; in less 
quantities, 51-2c; flake litharge, casks, 
$5; smalls, $5.50 per 100 lb. 

Linseed Oil.— Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 
46c; 5 to 9 barrels, 45c; boiled, 1 to 4 
barrels, 49c. ; 5 to 9 barrels, 48c. Terms, 
net cash 30 days. Delivered in Ontario 
between Montreal and Oshawa at 2c 
per gallon advance. 

Turpentine.— Single barrels 84c; 2 to 
4 barrels, 83c Standard gallon of 8.6 
pounds. Terms, net cash in 30 days. 

Benzine.— 25 to 26c 

Shellac Varnish.— Pure white, $2.60. 
to $2.80; pure orange, $2.60 to $2.80; 
No. 1 orange shellac, $2.40 to $2.60. 

Mixed Paints.— $1.20 to $1.40 per gal- 
lon. 

Castor Oil.— 8 3-4 to 9 l-4c in whole- 
sale lots, and l-2c additional for small 
lots. 

English Paris Green.— 50 and 100 lb. 
drums, 15c per lb. ; 25 lb. drums, 15 l-2c; 
1-lb. paper boxes, 16c; 1-lb. tin boxes, 
17c Terms, 2 per cent, 30 days; 90 
days net. 

TORONTO. 

Business is dull, the " after-Christmas 
quietness." Quotations or red lead are 
reduced 1-4 to l-2c Paris green is now 
offering, Canadian brands, for immedi- 
ate delivery and English brands for fu- 
ture delivery. We quote: 

White Lead— Ex-Toronto, pure white 
lead, $4.75; No. 1, $4.30; No. 2, $4; No. 
3, $3.60; No. 4, $3.35 in packages of 25 
lb. and upwards; l-2c per lb. extra will 
be charged for 12 1-2-lb. packages ; gen- 
uine dry white lead, in casks, $4,871-2. 

Red Lead— Genuine, in casks of 560 
lb., $4.25 to $4.50; ditto, in kegs of 100 
lb., $4.75; No. 1, in casks of 560 lb., $4; 
ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $4.25. 

Litharge— Genuine, 6 to 6 l-2c 

White Zinc— Genuine, French V.M., 
in casks, $6 to $6.25; Lehigh, in casks, 
$6 to $6.25. 

Shingle Stain— In 5-gallon lots, 60 to 
85c per gallon. 

Paris White— 90c to $1 per 100 lb. 

Whiting— 60 to 65c per 100 lb. ; Gild- 
ers' whiting, 75 to 80c 

Shellac— Pure orange, in, ban-els 
$2.45; white, $2.60 per gallon; No. 1, 
15c less; in less quantities 30c extra, 
including price of can. 

Pumice Stone— Powdered, $2.50 per 



cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c per lb. in less 
quantity; lump, 10c. in smal lots and 
8c. in bbls. 

Linseed Oil— Raw, 1 to 2 bbls., 50c; 
boiled, 53c; 3 to 5 bbls., raw, 49c; boil- 
ed, 52c; 6 to 9 bbls., raw, 48c; boiled. 
51c, delivered. To Toronto, Hamitlon 
and London, 2c less. 

Turpentine— Single bbls., 86c; 2 to 
4 bbls., 85c, delivered ; 5 bbls. and over, 
open. Toronto, Hamilton and London, 
2c less. For less quantites than bar- 
rels, 5c per gallon extra will be added, 
and for 5-gallon packages, 50c and 10- 
gallon packages, 80c will be charged. 

Glues— Broken sheet, in 200-lb. bbls., 
8 to 8 l-2c per lb. ; cabinet glue, in bbls., 
11 1-2 to 12c ; emery glue, in bbls., 17c ; 
bookbinders', ground, 101-2c; finest 
American, white, 19c ; No. 1 American 
white, 15c per lb. 

Putty — Common, $1.65; pure , bladders 
in barrels, $2.25; bladders, in 100-lb. 
kegs, $2.40 ; bulk, in barrels, $2.05 ; bulk, 
less than barrels and up to 100 lb., $2.95. 

Plaster Paris— New Brunswick, $2 
per bbl. 

Liquid Paints— Pure, $1.20 to $1.40 
per gallon; No. 1, $1.10 per gallon. 

Barn Paints— 65 to 70c per gallon. 

Castor Oil— English, in eases, 71-2 to 
8c per pound, and 8 1-2 to 9c for single 
tins. 

Paris Green— English pure (for fu- 
ture delivery) Petroleum bbls., 141-4c; 
arsenic kegs, 141-2c; 50 and 100-lb. 
drums, 15c; 1-lb. packages, 16c; 1-lb. 



tins, 17c; 1-2-lb. packages, 1-2-lb. tins, 
19c Canadian (present delivery) Pe- 
troleum bbls., 12 l-4c. ; arsenic kegs, 
121-2c; 50 and 100-lb. drums, 13c; 
1-lb. packages, 14c ; 1-lb. tins, 15c ; 
1-2-lb. packages, 16c 



ST. JOHN. 

Oil— In burning oil the market con- 
tinues very firm. The outlook for lin- 
seeds is for low prices, with buyers 
backward. Turpentine is high. Lubri- 
catings begin to have more attention. 
A new company have opened a ware- 
house on the south wharf and The Sun 
Oil Co. have made a change of managers. 
Fish oil is very scarce. 

WINDOW GLASS. 

TORONTO. 

There is little doing. Prices are still 
being cut. We quote prices nom- 
inally as follows: Star, under 26 in., 
$3.10; 26 to 40 in., $3.30; 41 to 50 in., 
$3.70; 51 to 60 in., $4; 61 to 70 in., 
$5 ; 71 to 80 in., $4.30 net, Toronto, Ham- 
ilton and London. 

MONTREAL. 

Prices are unchanged and are now 
being well maintained. We quote 
the following prices: First break, 50 
feet, $1.70; second brake, $1.80 for 50 
feet. First break, 100 feet, $3.25; sec- 
ond break, $3.45; third break, $3.95; 
fourth break, $4.20. 



WE WISH 



that the many favors extended by our patrons in the past shall continue during 1904, and 
that we shall mutually enjoy a larger and more profitable business than last year. 



YOU 



may rely upon our best efforts to maintain the high standard of quality which our Anchor 
Brand goods have always been kept up to. 



A HAPPY 



Combination is Anchor Brand Paint and the merchant who sells it. He knows he has the 
only brand in Canada which contains Brandram's B. B. Genuine White Lead — the best in 
the world — and he enters upon the 

NEW YEAR. 

confident of having a successful season, and handling a line of goods that will give satis- 
faction to both himself and customers. 

HENDERSON & POTTS, Limited, Halifax. 
HENDERSON & POTTS CO., Limited, Montreal. 



46 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and 
Metal 



CHURCH'S COLD WATER 



ALABA5TINE 



is already half sokl when a dealer puts u in stock because of our GENEROUS ADVERTISING in public papers. It is not a kalsomine, hut a permanant coating that hardens 
with age, a claim that cannot be truthfully made of any other wall-coating. The patented feature— READY FOH USE BY MIXING IN COLD WATER— is a great ad- 
vantage to the busy workman. He appreciates it, and to sell anything else it must be recommended as "the same thing," or "just as good." No dealer can afford to make 



such representation. The public knows Alabastine, and little or nothing about the jnst-as-goods. There is no loss in selling Ahlbastine— it is put up in moisture proof pack 
ages, and in the most popular shades. 

We shall help to sell Alabastine in the future, just as we have for more than twenty years past. Order early either through jobber, or of 



THE ALABASTINE CO., Limited, PARIS, ONT. 



Two Mechanics' Novelties. 

Considerable interest was aroused 
some time ago by a reference, with illus- 
tration, of a miniature monkey wrench 
made by the Mechanics' Supply Co., 
Quebec. This firm are now also making 
a miniature hammer of similar size. 
Either of these will be supplied the trade 
at 30e. each or $2.75 per dozen. 



The assets of the estate of J. W. Mor- 
row, general merchant, Robinson, are ad- 
vertised to be sold. 

Standard Paint & Varnish Works 

Limited 

Makers of High-Grade Varnishes, Japans, 
Paints, Colors and Enamels. 

WINDSOR, ONT. 



RC TUHDNC 768Crai & st - 
. C InUnnC., Montreal 

Wholesale Agent and Importer 

Dry Colors, Ochres, Bronze Powders, 
Aluminum Powder, Schlag Metal, 
Bronze Liquids and Varnishes. 

Toronto Office 29 Melinda St. 



HARDWARE AND METAL is the only journal in Canada concerning 
itself with the paint, oil and glass interests. Its markets are trust- 
worthy and full. 




lobbies 4jr Hoare. 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENC. 

ttanufacturers 01 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 



Which can be obtained direct from the works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada. 




Paints and Paints 

Some are good, some poor. If GLOBE PAINTS were 
poor they wouldn't be 9 years on the market. It takes 
a good article to live as long as that. We are not only 
living, but growing. That means a good deal. 

—When our salesman calls on you, pay good heed 
to what he has to say. 



The Globe Paint Co., 

_ Limited 

' 422-424 Adelaide St. W., Toronto. 



"Island City" Paint-Varnish Works 




Our "Island City" Enamel Paints 

are the best in the market — 17 artistic shades. 

Our "Island City" Aluminum, Gold 
and Silver Paints can be used with 
great satisfaction on Furnaces, Radiators, all 
sorts of Furniture and Ornaments that require 
renovating. 



P. D. DODS & CO., Proprietors, Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver. 



47 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




The Colorado Beetle or, to give him 
the Latin term, DORYPHORA DE- 
CEMLINEATA, commonly known 
as the Potato Bug, is an undesirable 
immigrant from "Uncle Sam" who does 
not respect the Boundry Line or the 
Alien Act. Like the Lily of the Valley 
it " toils not neither does it spin " ; un- 
like the lily it is not famous for its beauty 
and, being a vagrant, he wears ten stripes 
after the manner of a penetentiary bird. 
Moreover, the bug hath a voracious ap- 
petite, which, as Shakespeare says : 
" Age does not diminish nor custom 
stale." 

Herein is the potato bug's weakness: 
It devours the tender leaf of the succu- 
lent potato, and, at the same time, 
encompasses its own destruction PRO- 
VIDED, however, that the vine has 
been judiciously sprinkled with the 
CANADA PAINT COMPANY'S 
PURE PARIS GREEN. This Green 
has been endorsed by the Department 
of Agriculture at Ottawa and is the noted 
insecticide bearing death and destruction 
to potato bugs, slugs and all leaf-eating 
insects. 

The dealers who purchase the Paris 
Green made by the Canada Paint Com- 
pany have this Canadian Company's 
guarantee of its purity and the security 
that its death-dealing qualities will bring 
havoc amongst the pests which are the 
bane of the farmer. May the use of the 
C. P. Co's Green be universal and bring 
the Potato Bug an 

"UNHAPPY NEW YEAR." 




\ LIFE 

C.p\ TO 

P.GV THE 

/ POTATO 



WALL PAPER 



Discoloration of Ingrain and How to 

Avoid It. 
T N conversation with a gentleman con- 
nected with the paper-hanging trade, 
bearing on this topic, he gave us the 
result of his experience, which may be 
worth while putting into print for the 
benefit of others. He set out with the 
statement that he would guarantee to 
make a good job anywhere, and he re- 
cited this experience. 

A customer came with a client and sel- 
ected a paper, a blue ingrain, patterned. 
The painter took it away, and in due 
course it was hung. Within a few days 
complaints came to the warehouse that 
the paper was faulty, and had dried all 
in patches. To appease the "customer's" 
"customer," a new paper was supplied 
free of charge — this time a red one — and 
sent on to the job. This was hung, and 
after the usual "decent" interval the 
complaint came along, accentuated and 
emphasized by vigorous adjectival Eng- 
lish, and demands for compensation. 

It was at this stage that our informant 
came on the scene. He had been away 
on his holidays, and the transactions had 
all taken place during his absence. As 
an expert the matter was referred to 
him, and he took it up in earnest. He 
found (1) that the wall on which it was 
hung was a painted wall, (2) that the 
work had been done on a wet day, (3) 
that the paper hanger had religiously 
kept closed up every avenue of air, (4) 
that he had not lined the painted walls 
prior to papering, and (5) that he had 
used^ thin, sloppy paste. 
. The room was thereupon done under 
the direct supervision of the expert. First 
the walls were stripped and lined, the 
lining being hung horizontally. Second- 
ly, the paste was made very strong, but 
stiff. Thirdly, the windows and doors 
were kept closed while the paper was be- 
ing hung. Fourthly, the paper was 
pasted as "dry" as could be done with 
safety, and not allowed to stand ; and, 
fifthly, as soon as the walls were hung, 
doors and windows were opened to circu- 
late the air as much as possible, and, 
with a fire in the grate, the original blue 
paper was hung — and turned out an un- 
qualified success. Our informant said 
that with these conditions, i.e., stiff, 
strong paste, free from alum, dry past- 
ing, walls lined when the under surfaces 
are painted (brown paper in sheets pre- 
ferred), he would guarantee the work 
turning out well in ninety-nine cases out 
of one hundred. We believe he is right ! ! 

From The Journal of Decorative Axt. 

-IK 



Valuable Hinta on Hanging Wall Paper. 

s.By E. A. Edmunds, Brooklyn. 

THE rfanner of treatment described 
in the following lines has served 
me with unqualified success for 
many years : 

First, prepare the walls. If they arc 
painted, size them with washing soda ; 
nothing else. Make the solution strong 
enough so that you can see it cut the 
paint as you spread it on. Care should 
be taken to prevent it from running 
down over the finished woodwork. When 
dry it will be ready to receive the paper. 
The treatment makes the paint porous 
so that the paste can take hold and ob- 
viate the disasters of "peeling off" and 
"opening" at the joints on becoming 
thoroughly dry. It destroys grease and 
renders the semi-saponified paint to good 
purpose as a backing. 

The wall should always lie sand-papered 
to remove the small lumps after plaster- 
ing up the holes and cracks. 

If the walls be clean, hard-finished 
plaster, irrespective of their age, I treat 
them with a strong solution of glue and 
vinegar (cider vinegar preferred). Dip- 
solve the glue in water over a slow fire, 
then thin down with vinegar, and apply 
copiously. The vinegar destroys the 
enemy (lime) which causes the paper t<> 
shrink apart at the joints and bleach out 
in spots. i cannot recall an instance 
where this solution has failed, even on 
soft, chalky, "hot" walls. All new walls 
or parts of walls should be treated with 
a coat of this vinegar size. 

In no case should good papers be put 
on over old ones, or over kalsomine. 

The factor that contributes most to the 
appearance of a nice room is cleanliness ; 
without this your work will be a failure, 
irrespective of the cost of paper. In or- 
der to attain this you must use your 
paste so heavy that it is barely possible 
to work it out evenly on the back of the 
goods without injuring them. This ap- 
plies to all grades and kinds of wall 
hangings, whether of paper or tapestry. 
In the latter case (tapestry fabrics) it i's 
often advisable to paste the wall, then 
"roll" the goods on. 

The knife and straight-edge should be 
used to trim with, especially on heavy 
goods. For "butted" work hang the 
strips from a sixteenth to an eighth of 
an inch apart, then work them gradually 
together, and when you have the room all 
hung, carefully roll down the joints, then 
with a clean wet sponge moisten the 
joint by passing the sponge over it once 
only. This latter act is to remove the 
gloss the roller makes, and applies to in- 
grains or Other pulp papers. Do not 
sponge printed or surfaced goods, the 
colors will run. -Carpets. Wall Paper 
and Curtains. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Remember this is Janu- 
ary — in a few weeks the 
Spring Wall Paper trade 
will be in full swing — 
are you ready for it ? Not 
many dealers delay buy- 
ing this late — if you are 
one of the "late ones" 
take a suggestion — order 
now, before the choice is 
further curtailed. Write 
us for salesman to call or 
for samples. 



.«• 



iZktiffih 



r 



^\ 




YOU DON'T NEED AN ACCIDENT POLICY WITH A 



it 



NEW GEM" 

SAFETY RAZOR 



in your hand. If you want a shave that's smart or a shave that 
smarts, take a New Gem Safety Razor for the former and any other 
make for the other. You will get just what you are looking for in 
either instance. The New Gem Safety Razor is as "bracing" in its 
effect as a cold plunge in early morn. Clean, healthy, safe, simple 
and economical. All leading dealers in Cutlery find it profitable and 
highly satisfactory to handle The Gem. Rock bottom quotations 
furnished upon applicat'on. 

GEM CUTLERY CO. 



34 Reade Street, 



NEW YORK CITY. 



Sausage Staffer, Lard 
«n2> Fnrit Press 




8 Sizes and Styles 

Rapid Grinding and 
Pulverizing Mills 

1,0 Sizes and Styles 
for Hand and Power 




No. 3, $5.50. 




TRADE 



ENTERPRISE 



MARK 



Meat and Food Choppers 



Meat Juice Extractor 



Bone, Shell and Corn \ 
Hill \ 



No. 750, $8.50. 



TINNED 

40 Sizes and Styles for Hand and Power 
from $1.00 to 5300.00 




No 12, $2.75. 
Sold by all the leading Jobbers of the Dominion 

ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE MAILED TREE 



The Enterprise Mfg. Co. qf P&>. 



Philadelphia. Pa... U. S. A. 




j No. 21. $2.S0 



Raisin Seedet 




No. 36. $1.00 



; Cold Handle Polishing 
IRON 




No. 82, $7.50 per doz. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



INDUSTRIAL GOSSIP 



Hardware and Metal would be pleased to receive from any authoritative source industrial news of any sort, the 
formation or incorporation of companies, establishment or enlargement of mills, factories foundries or other 
works, railway or mining news, etc. All such correspondence will be treatpd as confidential when desired. 



THE Canada Brake and Supply Co., 
Toronto, have been incorporated 
with a capital of $60,000, to man- 
u fact ure and deal in brakes and other 
mechanism.. The directors are J. L. 
Spink. S. ('. Smoke, both of Toronto ; J. 
L. Peacock. Buffalo : W. li. Belson, C. B. 
Tryon. both of (Jreenfell, Assa. 

The Great Northern Bailway has 
awarded the contract for the construction 
of 1 70 miles of new railroad from Gati- 
neau Junction to Quebec. The road is 
being built to avoid the steep grade 
through the Laurentian mountains. It 
will cost §1,200,000, and there is a pro- 
vincial subsidy of S3, 200 per mile, making 
a total of 8221,000. 

The National Table Factory, Owen 
Sound, Out., was almost completely de- 
stroyed by fire recently. The loss is 
estimated to be in the vicinity of 860,000. 
The origin of the fire is unknown. A 
member of the company says that the 
factory will be rebuilt as soon as the 
necessary building material could be ob- 
tained and the weather permitted. 

It is claimed by the municipal authori- 
ties of St. Johns, Que., that The Singer 
Mfg. Co. have accepted the inducement 
made by that municipality for the re- 
moval of their Canadian plant from 
Montreal to St. Johns. D. J. Fraser, 
manager of the Montreal plant, says that 
it is the purpose of the company to build 
a plant in St. Johns with a capacity 
three, times that of the one now at 
Montreal. At present the company have 
their cabinet work manufactured in 
Woodstock. Out., but the proposed plant 
in St. Jonns will manufacture all re- 
quirements of the sewing machine. 

A steel girder bridge oxer the Zambesi 
Falls. Africa, will be the highest in the 
world. 120 feet above water level. Tt 
will be 650 feet long. The erection of the 
bridge will take place simultaneously 

from both sides of the river, the weielil 
being carried by steel cables until the 
two halves of the central span abut and 

are eon 'ted. The structure. the 

total weight of which will bi' 1,600 tons 

of steel, is nearly finished in England 
now. and will be shipped about December. 
During its erection a cableway will be 
arranged for the purpose of passing 
across material required for (lie bridge, 



and also for conveying railway material 
needed for the" line north of the river. 



NOTES. 

There has not been a better season for 
logging for .many years on the North 
Shore, E.B., and everything is encourag- 
ing. 

A general reduction in wages, averaging 
about 10 per cent., is to be made at all 
non-union iron and steel plants in the 
United States. 

J. F. Brown, architect, Toronto, is 
getting out plans for a Baptist church at 
Snellgrove. It is to be built of brick 
and will cost about $3,000. 

The Massey-Harris Co. have decided to 
make a reduction of about 10 per cent, 
on piece work and a cut from $1.45 to 
81.35 per day in laborer's wages. 

A recent fire caused considerable da- 
mage to the stock in an annexed build- 
ing of the Adams Bros.' harness factory 
on King street east. Toronto. 

The Chateauguay and Northern Eail- 
way are going to erect large freight 
sheds at corner of Morean and St. Cath- 
erine streets, Montreal, to cost 85,000. 

Tin' Richelieu and Ontario Navigation 
Co. have decided to construct a marine 
railway at their works at Sorel. *It will 
be the first of its kind constructed in 
Canada. 

A recent fire damaged the planing- mill 
and sash and door factory of D. Aitchi- 
son &; Co., Hamilton, Out., to the extent 
of 820.000. The loss is covered almost 
entirely by insurance. 

During the past two weeks nearly five 
hundred men have been taken on the 
construction work at The Dominion Iron 
and Steel Co. There are employed now 
on the works in the vicinity of i. 60(1 
men. 

A despatch from Nelson, B.C., says that 
an important strike of silver-lead has 
been made at the Sullivan Mine in East 
Kootenay. This will place the Sullivan 
Mine in the front rank- of silver-lead 
mines. 

Douglas & Eatcliff, Toronto, have been 
incorporated with a capital of 810,000, 
to carry on in all its branches the busi- 
ness of paper dealer and to acquire the 
business of Douglas & Eatcliff, Toronto. 
The directors are S. J. Douglas. F. L. 
KatelilV and Geo. I'owhy. all of Toronto, 

50 



FLINTCOTE ROOFING. 

"Flintcote" roofing has only been on 
the Canadian market a short time, yet 
through its merits and its adaptability 
to understand the rigorous climate of 
Canada, has had a very large sale. The 
company is represented in Canada by Mr. 
J. B. Gass, of Montreal ; in Toronto, by 
Mr. T. E. Flint, and in Winnipeg and the 
West by MacKenzie Bros. The great ad- 
vantage claimed for this roofing over 
other roofings is a wonderful elasticity 
which permits of contraction and expan- 
sion without opening the seams in the 
slightest, a feature which is very neces 
sary for such a changeable climate as 
ours. 



INQUIRIES FOR CANADIAN TRADE. 

THE following were among the recent 
inquiries relating to Canadian trade 
received at the Canadian Government 
office in London : 

i. A Liverpool firm of commission and general 
merchants, offering good references, are seeking 
the representation of a good Canadian exporter. 

2. Inquiry is made respecting the nature of the 
encouragement offered by any municipal authority 
n Canada in the event of a company or group of 
capitalists starting a new industry by erecting a 
factory for the manufacture of a staple article not 
at present being produced in the Dominion. 

5. Application has been made for the addresses 
of iron works (blast furnaces) or steel works in 
Canada, by a firm desiring to bring before them 
propositions concerning the utilization of slags. 

6. A Vienna commission merchant, with English 
experience and good references, is anxious 10 he a 
from Canadian exporters starting a Continental 
connpetion. 

7. The names of parties in different parts of 
Canada, wi ling to act as buying agents for a large 
manufacturer of sauces and other similar grocers' 
sundries have been applied for. 

8. A West of England firm have asked to be 
furnished with the name of a large Canadian can- 
ning house requiring representation in Great 

Britain. 



The following enquiries were received 
at the Canadian Section of the Imperial 
Institute, London, Eng. : 

9. An engineering company seeks the co-opera- 
tion of some first-class Canadian manufacturers 
prepared to take up the manufacturing agency of 
their brick and tile machinery. 

10. A timber manufacturing firm, in a position to 
place considerable orders, wishes to hear from 
Canadian shippers of box shooks. 

n. Enquiry has been made for the addresses of 
Canadian manufacturers of carpets. 

12. A Bristol manufacturer of fire bricks for 
furnaces, who can ship advantageously from Avon- 
mouth, would like to hear from Canadian buyers 
of these goods. 

(The names of those making inquiries 
may be obtained from the Editor of Harp- 
ware and Metal, I 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The 



HOBBS MANUFACTURING CO. 



LONDON, 



CANADA. 



LIMITED 



importers sheet Window Glass, Muffled and Cathedral Tints, Ornamental Figured 
Glass, Polished British Plate, Rolled Plate Glass, Prismatic Sheet Glass. 

MANUFACTURERS 

Church and Cathedral Leaded Windows, Domestic Art Stained Glass, 

Bevelled Plate and Mirrors, Ceiling and Finger Plates, Memorial and Portrait Windows, 
Chipned, Obscured and Enamelled, Mitred and Sand Cut, Paper Weights and 
Advertising Signs, Eleotro Glazed Art Glass and Ornamental Prismatio Glass 

EI L. IE ^^ T™ ^? C5 OL.AZEI D ART GLASS Not a chea P imitation of copper plate, not a dull flat finish, but Electro Glazed 

^^ ^"^ with a solid deposit of copper and a bright clear polished copper finish. 



v v9ww 



SET 







No. 821 



No. 632 





lo. 222 



ipl 


*f\ 


( ^ffi(K^i&KJn 






Ei* : 




Mtr 










mWsLXJX^^X^ 



No. 523 



No. 630 




No. 520 



No. 631 







\AAAAAA !: * j 




RETl 

may 2| 




No. 635 No. 623 

WE CARRY A LARGE STOCK OF WINDOW GLASS. QUALITY THE BEST. PRICES ARE RIGHT. 
WE MANUFACTURE AND IMPORT EVERYTHING IN GLASS REQUIRED FOR BUILDINGS. 

WRITE FOR OATALOGUE AND PRICES 

51 



Hardwars and 
Metal 




PLUMBING PRACTICE PAST AND PRESENT. 

By Geo. Clapperton. 




subject 



EFORE entering upon the 
subject of my paper, I think 
it but proper to offer a little 
explanation. I must con- 
fess that in choosing a 
In write mi, T found it 
quite difficult to decide on one, which 
would be interesting, and at the same 
time somewhat instructive. For to me 
it apeared as if to read a paper on 
plumbing before plumbers, was some- 
what like shipping coal to Newcastle, 
but be that as it may, I became bolder 
as I thought over the various subjects, 
and eventually chose "Past and Pres- 
ent Plumbing." While 1 may not be 
able to place before you all the facts 
which I would like, or you might ex- 
pect, still if I can place enough to make 
you think a little harder and deeper in- 
to the subject of inv paper, it has not 
been without its reward. 

Having chosen our subject, next let 
us see what the meaning of the wyrt^ 
Plumber is, this we find is " one who 
works in lead, or a lead worker." Now, 
while we are not told by historians that 
all the men of ancient days who worked 
in lead were plumbers, still most of 
ymi here will agree with me when I say 
that lie could not have been called by a 
better name. So, we will consider all 
lead workers of ancient days as plumb- 
ers. 

Chinese the First Plumbers. 

This takes us back quite a long way, 
tor we find that the Chinese, long before 
the Christian era used lead and solder- 
ed lead and other materials together. 
To think that the Chinese were the 
pioneers of our trade may not be 
pleasant to many of us, but it neverthe- 
less is true. But, the Chinese were not 
the only ones which used lead about 
this time, for we find Archimedes, a 
Creek philosopher, who lived 200 years 
before the Christian era, used lead pipe. 

We lind it stated in the Bible, that 
lead is a lasting metal for letters, and 
that David used leaden pipes, also that 
in the ancient cities of Asia, Egypt, 

A paper delivered before The Toronto Master 
Plumbers' Association, on Monday, Dec. 28. 



Greece and Syria, lead pipes were used. 
These, Mr. Chairman, will be quite suffi- 
cient to prove that there were lead 
workers (whom we now call plumbers) 
in the early days, and taking- Archi- 
medes for the first plumber we have our 
age, 200 years B.C., or bringing it up 
to the present time, makes it 2,103 years 
old, quite a respectable age, while this 
may seem a long time, it would fade 
into insignificance, when we compare it 
with the Chinese, who used lead nearly 
5,000 years ago. History tells us that 
there was such a man as a lead worker, 
but does not tell us that he had a help- 
er, who was to be an apprentice to the 
trade, so that we will consider his help- 
er as a laborer or handy man, and the 
explanation, no doubt, will account for 
a lot of the lost art, if T may call it 
such, for none of us would care to dis- 
pute the fact, that the ancients knew 
secrets about which we know nothing. 
To thoroughly understand this one has 
only to turn up some of the old masters 
and see what wonderful wisdom and 
skill the ancient plumber displayed in 
the use of metals and hydaulics. 

Having obtained our age, now let ns 
look and see if we can trace some of 
the metals and articles which we now 
use. While many have changed their 
shape, as well as their .material, others 
have retained their shape and changed 
their material. 

Sheet Lead. 
As we have no records of pipe being 
drawn by the ancients, it will be fair 
to assume that they first cast their lead 
into sheets, and then formed them into 
pipe,, burning or soldering- the seams, so 
that this must have been the style of 
pipe used bv Archimedes, besides we 
read of lead being- used as 'leaves for 
books.' The Westminster Abbey and 
St. Paul's Cathedra] have cast sheets 
of lead for roofs, the former was built. 
in tin' 13th century, likewise the King's 
College, Cambridge, built in the loth 
century, lias cast sheets for a flooring 
between ceiling and roof. The first re- 
cords we have of sheet lead being- rolled 
was in (he year 1070, when a patent was 
52 



issued to Howard & Watson, and known 
as an engine and rollers for drawing- 
lead into sheets. This machine did its 
work with cold rollers. Afterwards in 
1804, Do.dds patented a machine which 
worked with hot rollers. Burr follow- 
ed him using rollers heated by hot 
water. Since this time lead has been 
rolled in a very similar way, and I am 
told is rolled in much the same way to 
the present day, only substituting steam 
for hot water. Polled sheet lead was 
first used for sheeting of ships. 
Lead Soil Pipes. 

This kind of soil pipe has been used 
in the Eastern cities, especially in Rome, 
almost from the earliest recorded time. 
They were used in France long before 
they became known in England". Sir 
John Harrington was the great advocate 
1 f lead soil pipes in England and he 
lived during the reign of Queen Eliza- 
beth which was from 1558 to 1603. A.D. 
So his advocacy must have been prior 
to 1603, or 300 years ago, but lead soil 
pipes must have been used long before 
this, as we find one Robert Brocke ob- 
tained an English patent for casting- 
lead soil pipe in the year 1539, these 
were made in short lengths of 18 incites 
and three feet long, slightly tapered, 
and then joined together by burning. 
By this means they had a pipe resembl- 
ing our present pipe, but not as good. 
After this they cast the lead pipe very 
thick, and then drew it through a die. 
this enabled them to make it any re- 
quired thickness. This way came into 
use about 1800. I have no doubt but 
Brocke copied this idea from Braham 's 
patent, for he invented a machine for 
pressing a pipe through a die, thereby 
getting a pipe which very much re- 
sembled the drawn pipe of to-day. His 
machine was worked by hand and he 
worked or used the lead while it was in 
its molten state. In 1820, or about 20 
years after Bramah's patent,, we find a 
man by the name of Burr patented an 
improvement on Bramah's machine by 
applying the hydraulic press to it. thus 
enabling him to do his work easier. He 
worked his lead, while it was hot but in 
a solid slate. 

Then came Hague, who patented a 
press, using, instead of the hydraulic 
ocss. one driven by a powerful screw 



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and compound cogwheel. Since these 
there appear to have been no improve- 
ments of note for making drawn pipe. 
For the machine of to-day appears to 
be worked similar to Burr's machine. 

While these machines appear to have 
been doing good work, it took a num- 
ber of years to displace the old soil pipe 
made from sheet lead and seamed 
lengthwise, but the start having been 
made nothing appears to have impeded 
the steady progress and Ave passed from 
hand-made pipe to machine pressed 
pipe, then to cast iron, copper and now, 
wrought iron soil pipes, which brings 
us up to the present day with soil pipe. 
Solder. 

Next let us see about the metal used 
to mix solder, namely tin. This metal 
is contained in nearly everything the 
plumber has to do with, however, we 
will deal with it only as it forms solder. 
Here we can go a long way further back 
than we did with sheet lead, for we 
find that the Chinese have records of its 
use as far back at '2,200 B.C., this is 
nearly 5,000 years ago, besides we know 
the Egyptians used it and were un- 
doubtedly Al .plumbers, for they were 
not satisfied with simply laying lead, 
and lead pipes, for imbucated vases 
were their delight, you will find them 
represented in the times of Thotimes 
the Third. In Malacca, tin was found 
in very remote ages, also soldering lead 
pipes is mentioned by Vitrurious. The 
ancient plumber, not only knew how to 
do his work (but unlike the plumber of 
to-day) took advantage in soldering 
with the capillary action of the solder, 
for we read that their soldering was so 
neat that it could not be seen. They 
wer in the habit of tapping the lead and 
letting the solder sweat underneath, 
more especially in cistern work where 
the water was liable to eat away the tin 
as they called it, in some isolated cases. 
This way is still used for chemical work. 

Solder is one of the materials which 
has changed but little during the last 
5,000 years and before passing away 
from it, it is but fair to say, that the 
ancient plumber, not only mixed tin 
and lead together to form his solder, but 
it often contained lead, tin, bismuth, 
mercury and cadmium, by adding or 
combining the first four of these to- 
gether in proper proportions the com- 
bined metals will melt with 122 degrees 
(if heat or only 22 degrees more than 
your blood heat, or 90 degrees less than 
would boil water. When you consider 
the finest solder we use, that is half-and- 
half requires 370 degrees of heat to 



melt, you will not wonder how the an- 
cients did such fine work. Now, we have 
our sheet lead, soil pipe and solder. 

The Earliest Trap. 

Let us look back to the all important 
article, namely the trap. We find that 
the earliest trap which has been located 
was taken out of the Lathbury Old 
Church built by the famous architect, 
Sir Christopher Wren. This trap bears 
the date of 1678 A.D., 225 years ago, it 
was for a water closet and made of a 
' ' 4-square ' ' shape, of the style com- 
monly called " D " traps. While this 
would not be copied by our modern 
plumber, still this one was well made and 
by some means unknown to the writer, 
the bottom was increased over one half 
in thickness, which is more than could 
be said of all the hand-made traps of 
more recent dates. Some of you no 
doubt will be skeptical about this date, 
but when you remember that sheet lead 
was rolled in 1670 or eight years before 
this trap was made it will no doubt re- 
move that doubt. But the ancients did 
not call everything placed under a fix- 
ture by the word trap, they called our 
present " S " trap a syphon, and used 
it for syphon purposes only. As far 
as I can find out a trap was used first 
to' keep back gases in chemical work 
so they have not changed their use in 
all these years, as far as keeping back 
gases is concerned. 

They have changed their shape, but 
little, but that little has made a wonder- 
ful difference in the cleanness of this 
particular article, for we now have in 
our drawn trap one which is smooth in- 
side and has no square corners to accu- 
mulate filth. This cannot be claimed of 
our many cast traps, be they brass or 
other metal, for as you are all aware 
they often contain a very highly polish- 
ed exterior and a very rough and un- 
even surface on the interior. 

While I am able to date back 225 
years with the trap, I must admit that 
the records do not say that they had any 
particular kind of a closet bowl, but if 
they had used a trap for water closet 
purposes they must have had a bowl of 
some sort attached, however, we find 
that there was an English patent taken 
out by one Cumming, in the year 1775. 
This closet was worked with a slide 
valve. Two years later Prosser 
patented a closet (much resembling our 
old Demerest) with float balls to regu- 
late the water, for he says in his de- 
scription that when the basin empties. 
these balls act and cause the water to 
flow into the bowl). Then in 1878 
54 



Bramah patented a closet having two 
valves, one to regulate and control the 
water to the basin, the other to take it 
away. This closet had a ground in brass 
outlet 4 inches in size, a wooden frame 
and lead lined trunk. 

Then came Underhay, who made the 
bottom valve to close on a rubber seat. 
His idea was to reduce the cost (a typi- 
cal plumber) and guard against leak- 
age by grit or dirt getting under valve. 
This invention must have been made 
about 1840 as that was the year India 
rubber was first vulcanized and made 
suitable for this work. He also invent- 
ed a very simple air bellows, as well as 
an oil regulator, both for the purpose of 
controlling the action of the supply 
valve. After these closets were more 
or less at a stand still. In fact, the'y ap- 
pear to have retrograded, all kinds of 
valves, tanks and bowls were used. In- 
ventors, however, were in the meantime 
busy trying to get a closet which would 
fill the place, that is to remove the valve 
from the tank overhead. The first per- 
son to accomplish this was a Scotch- 
man, by the name of Wm. Ross, of Glas- 
gow. (This may not be accurate, as we 
only have his word for it). This brought 
the separate tank for each w.c. and the 
all-porcelain bowl and trap, of all shapes 
and sizes. This line of invention ap- 
pears to have a lasting effect up to the 
present day, until we have the closet 
bowl of to-day with an outlet of 2 1-2 
inches, a size which I think is altogether 
too small and I think that all here will 
admit that while the ancients erred by 
having everything too large, we have 
gone to the other extreme. 

But let us hurry along. The wash 
basin has been somewhat improved and 
made more easily kept clean, also its 
shape has changed to a more serviceable 
one. Our urinals have made some rapid 
strides in the last few years, and not 
before it was needed, for this fixture is 
one of the most useful and at the same 
time the hardest to properly arrange so 
that it will be self-cleansing. 

The Modern Kitchen Sink. 

"Next to the urinal, I think the kitchen 
sink comes; we have come from the old 
lead lined sink to the cast iron painted, 
then to the enamelled iron, and now the 
all-porcelain, but the greatest step was 
taken when the boxed in arrangement 
around the old sink was disposed of, 
with it went the store hole for every- 
thing around the kitchen. Contrast this 
old sink arrangement with our present 
cast iron enamelled sink and drainer, 
supported on brackets of the same ma- 



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You will tender during the forthcoming months on a 
/ good amount of Plumbing Work. 

Plumbing Jobs are too important to be trifled with. 
Cheapness is'^false economy. 

Workmanship is very important. This part of the 
contract is yours to figure on. 

Supplies are equally important. This is where we 
come in, — with your assistance. 

We are the one supply house for a majority of the 
plumbers from one ocean to the other in Canada. We 
keep busy, however, by asking for business. We ask for 
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Let us work with and through you on your 1904 
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terial and see what a difference there is, 
why. Mr. Chairman, one almost shud- 
ders to think of it. 

Stationary wash tubs appear to be of 
modern invention, but like all other in- 
ventions have been considerably improv- 
ed, for you are all well aware that the 
old wooden tubs are doomed and are 
gradually but surely passing away and 
being replaced by those made of non- 
absorbing material. 

Pumps Ancient and Modern. 
There is still another fixture which 
we do not often see in the present day, 
namely pinups, or machinery for rais- 
ing water. When the first one was in- 
vented 1 cannot tell, but we know that 
the Archimedes screw was used 200 
years B.C. for raising water, when it 
was required to raise water to a great 
height. A series, one obliquely above 
the other, was employed. After this the 
old chain pump came into use, such en- 
gines (if they may be called such) may 
be found to-day along the banks of the 
Nile and in Hindostan. This is one 
means of raising water where the atmos- 
phere need not be taken into account. 
Then came the historic water ram. This 
was invented by a Frenchman, Mont- 
golfer, somewhere late in 1700. This 
machine, while simple of construction, 
is perhaps one of the most difficult to 
adjust. This machine has been known 
to do some very peculiar work. There 
is one now in use in Hartford, Conn., 
where the water is brought from a lit- 
tle river half a mile distant and then 
raised to a height of 140 feet. There 
is another in England which raises water 
k34 feet, the water supply being only 
41-2 feet above the water ram. This 
ram raises 262 gallons per hour. Then 
came the centrifugal pump. This was 
first exhibited and astonished the visi- 
tors at the London Exhibition in the 
year 1851 by Mr. Appold. The inventor 
claims to have raised water 67 feet 8 
inches by a speed of 1,322 revolutions 
per minute, probably not a case exists 
where the adaptions of science to the 
arts has met with such complete success 
as this; the whole machine is based on 
the strictest principals of mechanical 
science and yet its construction is so 
simple, that few can view it without an 
exclamation of surprise, that its inven- 
tion has been left to our times and not 
known long ago. Then came the force 
pump about 1853, this is still in use, 
only somewhat remodelled and im- 
proved. 



Now, 1 think 1 have about exhausted 
your patience, so will close with a short 
summary. 

We find the plumber of old doing his 
work in a very round about way, but in 
a thorough manner, his material was 
somewhat clumsy . and in some cases 
awkward, but he nevertheless displayed 
considerable ingenuity to overcome diffi- 
culties. He had to take his raw ma- 
terial and manufacture his work, then 
put it in place. We, on the contrary, have 
our manufacturer and supply men, who 
get our work ready, we simply put it in 
place. We also have his successes and 
his failures in book form for our guide. 
Is the plumber of to-day as good a me- 
chanic as his predecessor? This ques- 
tion 1 will leave with you. 

Shelby Steel Tubing. 

JOHN MILLEN & SONS, Montreal, in 
form "Hardware and Metal" that 
they have been given the Canadian 
distributing agency for Shelby seamless 
cold-drawn steel tubes. They are carry- 
ing in their Montreal and Toronto ware- 
houses a large stock of about 150 sizes, 
which should be sufficient to meet the 
ordinary demands of the trade. Any . spe- 
cial orders for sizes not in stock can be 
tilled with little delay by importing from 
the United States. 

The Shelby tubes are made from the 
very best open-hearth steel, the material 
being soft and easily worked. It welds 
as easily as the best iron, but is much 
more ductile, and has a higher tensile 
strength. As the metal is cold drawn it 
is rendered dense, tough and ductile. The 
cold-drawn process gives it an increased 
tensile strength and produces a tube true 
in size and gauge. Working the tubes 
cold also eliminates the danger of surface 
defects, which often occur through the 
presence of rolling mill scales or other 
dirt in the fibre of the metal. 

The physical properties of the tubes are 
about as follows : 

Tensile strength 50,000 lbs. 

Electrical limit 35,000 lbs. 

lilongatiun 33 per cent. 

The introduction of this product into 
many iields of manufacture has been fol- 
lowed by the most gratifying results. 
Seamless steel tubing is now extensively 
used for various mechanical and engineer- 
ing purposes. It makes possible a great 
economy of labor, for it can be used for 
many purposes for which it has formerly 
been the custom in most shops to under- 
take the tedious task of boring througJi 
the solid steel. The tubing can be put to 
many different uses. For example it can 
be used for hollow axles, roller bearings, 
56 



laundry machine rollers, diamond drill 
rods, typewriters, hollow shafting, pneu- 
matic tubes, etc. It can be used in all 
classes of artistic iron work. 

The material from which these tubes 
are made is the best that can be obtain- 
ed ; it machines readily and cuts free and 
clean. Soft annealed tubes suitable for 
bending or forming into special shapes 
can be furnished. Both cold-drawn and 
hot-drawn tubes are furnished for mech- 
anical applications. Owing to its smooth 
linish and slight variation in diameter 
and gauge, a cold-drawn steel tube can 
often be used to advantage and with 
economy in place of an article ordinarily 
machined from solid stock. For such 
purposes as tubing is regularly used, 
seamless tubing possesses the maximum 
of strength with the minimum of weight. 

Seamless tubing is now extensively 
used for bicycle and automobile construc- 
tion. Manufacturers demand tubing of 
the greatest strength and rigidity, so 
that the construction will stand the 
severest shocks and vibratory strains. 
On this account the tubing in question is 
highly esteemed. 

John Millen & Sons. J ,.'i25 St. Cather- 
ine street, Montreal, will be pleased to 
send to "Hardware and Metal" readers 
fuller information regarding this tubing 
than we have been able to give in a 
short sketch, as well as price lists and 
all necessary particulars. 



To Ascertain Weight of Steel Tubing. 

'I - " 1 HE question is often asked, what is 
' the best method of ascertaining 
the weight per foot of any size 
and gauge of steel tubing. A Montreal 
firm have sent to "Hardware and Metal" 
the following method : 

Ascertain the decimals of both outside 
diameter and gauge. Subtract the deci 
mal of the gauge from the decimal of the 
outside diameter. Next multiply the re 
suit by the decimal of the gauge and 
multiply this result by 10.07. 

EXAM CLE. 

To ascertain the weight per foot of a. 
tube whose outside diameter is 2 inches 
and whose gauge is 10. The decimal of 
10 gauge is .134. 

First subtract the decimal of the gauge 
from the outside diameter . 
•>— .134= t.866. 

Multiply this result by the decimal of 
the gauge : 

f.866 x .134 - .250044. 

Multiply the result obtained by 10.67 : 
.250044 x 10.67 = 2.668UC948. 

The weight per foot of tubing 2 inches 
outside diameter and 10 gauge is 2.66S 
pounds. 



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We suspend for this occasion our 
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Contracting, and Hardware trade 

The Compliments 

of the Season. 



A. B. ORM&BY £» CO. 

Cor. Queen and George Streets, 
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Persons addressing advertisers will 
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Write for free samples. 
Agents being placed in every district. 



Arrow Brand Asphalt Ready Roofing 

Easy to lay— lasts long— needs no painting, as it conies in rolls 
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CONTRACTS 

mean dollars for the pockets of 
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CANADIAN 

CONTRACT 

RECORD 

tell where contracts may be had. 

|2 per year buys them. Address 

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Toronto and Montreal 



MADE IN ENGLAND 

CHAS. BAYNES 

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Factories and Home Office : INDIANAPOLIS, IND., U.S.A. Write for Catalogue and Prices 

H. P. HUBBARD, Sales Agent for Canada. Toronto Office ; 30 Front St. East. Tel. Main 1896. 



HEATING AND PLUMBING 



TORONTO PLUMBERS IN SOCIAL CONVENTION. 

New Foundry for Maisonneuve. 



AMPLE proof of the success of the 
monthly social evenings institut- 
ed last month by the Toronto 
Master Plumbers' Association was furn- 
ished at the meeting on Monday even- 
ing in the association rooms, Richmond 
street west. 

When President Robert Ross arose 
te " give the glad hand " there were 
riVer one hundred members of the asso- 
ciation present, as well as many guests. 
Among the latter were noticed : 

P. McMichael and W. Cluff, of The Dominion 
Radiator Co. 

T. Alcock, E. Brewer, and W. I,. Helliwell, of 
The Gurney Foundry Co. 

W. A. Porter and F. W. Armstrong, of The 
James Morrison Co. 

A. D. McMichael and M. Sheppard, of The 
lames Robertson Co. 

W. P. Malcolm and W. S. Jackson, of The 
Ideal Mfg. Co. 

Secretary Meredith read regrets from 
F. N. Cullen, of Cullen & Johnston, 
E. R Rogers, of the -James Robertson 
Co.. and Fred Somerville, of the Ontario 
Lead and Wire Co. 

Mr. Ross extended a hearty welcome 
to those Avho had responded to the invi- 
tation to be present at the evening's 
entertainment. The attendance was, 
he thought, a satisfatcory proof of the 
good fellowship existing between the 
manufacturers and supply men and the 
master plumbers. 

The feature of the evening was a paper 
on " Past and Present Plumbing," read 
by Mr. George Clapperton, of the Ben- 
nett & Wright Co. This most interest- 
ing and comprehensive report is publish- 
ed (at the request of many who heard it) 
verbatim in " Hardware and Metal." 

A live discussion of the paper ensued. 
The representatives of the manufactur- 
ing and jobbing houses extended greet- 
ings to their friends, the master plumb- 
ers, in their usual jolly and affection- 
ate manner. The universal keynote was 
that of harmony, good-will and mutual 
interest. One supply man caught the 
spirit of the occasion. " Indeed," he 
remarked, "our interests are one; we 
cannot do without you nor can you do 
Avithout us; if we are to be successful 
we must work together; and we wish 
the master plumbers of Toronto to make 
dollars during 1004 in place of the cents 
they made in 1003. and that the trade 
may continue to nourish and develop 
like a green bay tree." 

The splendid undercurrent of com- 
araderie was manifest during the even- 
ing, whether in the lighter vein of en- 
tertainment or when one member eulo- 
gized another or indulged perchance in 
a bit of pleasantry at his expense. 

After a fin« vaudeville and musical 
programme had been provided, to which 
several of the members contributed in ad- 
dition to first-class professional talent. 
i he evening's meeting, characterized 
by a distinct flavor of " old Scotch " 
ami cigars, adjourned with the singing 
of '( Anld Lang Syne" and the Na- 
tional Anthem. 



FOR some time past there have been 
numerous references in the Montreal 
daily papers to the new foundry 
which Warden King ist Son, of that city, 
are proposing to erect in Maisonneuve. 
When seen by "Hardware and Metal,'' 
Mr. King has courteously but persistent- 
ly declined to speak for publication until 
the matter is finally settled, claiming that 
the newspaper reports are premature and 
lor the most part incorrect. 

It is no secret, however, that Warden, 



their workmen will find it convenient to 
live in Maisonneuve. It seems likely that 
the town will get what it wants, but a 
hard and fast regulation would have been 
irksome in the extreme. 

It is the intention of Warden King & 
Son to erect buifdings costing $300,001 
within three years with the plant and 
machinery necessary for their proper 
equipment. it is understood that they 
have given the Town. Council every as- 
surance that this intention will be carried 
out. l)ii t they have been unwilling to en- 
ter into any hart! and fast contract to 
that effect. Refusing to be bound by 
contracts, they have accepted a commu- 
tation of municipal taxes instead of an 



King & Son have been negotiating with exemption. For 20 years they undertake 
the town of Maisonneuve in the outskirts 
of Montreal relative to the establishment 
in that town of a large foundry to em- 
ploy several hundred men. The town 
made some offers with regard to exemp- 
tion from taxation of the new buildings 
and plant, but sought to impose some 
restrictions which were not agreeable to 
the company. At least 50 per cent, of 
(lie employes were to reside ill Maison- 
neuve and the buildings were to be put 
up w it hiu a stated time. 

These conditions were not agreeable to 
Warden. King <.V Son. and there lias been 
some delay in reaching a basis of settle- 
ment which would be acceptable to both 
parties. It is now pretty well under- 
stood that an agreement has been made 
which is awaiting signature to make it 
binding. .Mr. King states that he con- 
siders nothing settled until the contract 
is signed, but it is understood that the 
agreement which now awaits signature is 
somewhat as follows : 

All restrictions as to time in which the 
buildings for the foundry, workshops, 
etc., are to be built are swept away T en- 
tirely. The proposed clause with regard 
to the place of residence of the employes 
lias also been eliminated. The firm are 
quite at liberty to choose their own em- 
ployes without reference to their place of 
residence, but in all probability most of 



to pay a tax of $200 per annum but no 
more. 

Both Warden King i_V Son and the town 
of Maisonneuve will receive important 
advantage from this agreement No 

matter how large or costly the buildings 
and plant which the firm may erect dur- 
ing the next .ill years their taxes are not 
to exceed X201I per annum. On the other 
hand the town can not fail to benefit 
from the presence of large iron works 
employing several hundred men. More 
over a tax of $200 per year will be de- 
rived from a property which at present 
pays less than X'2 per year in taxes to 
the corporation. The arrangement should 
be for the benefit of all concerned. 

At time of writing the agreement bas 
not yet been signed, but active prepara- 
tions are already being made to com- 
mence building operations in the early 
Spring. The total area of the land se- 
cured for the works is 100.000 square 
feet. The property has a depth of 1,013 
feet, and the frontage is on the line of 
the Chateauguay and Northern Railway. 

Chadwick & Beckett, architects. are 
getting out plans for a modern brick and 
stone residence for Mrs. V. Chadwick. 
Poplar Plains road, Toronto ; also for a 
brick residence for T. G. Blackstock, 20 
Homewood avenue, Toronto. 



FORTY DIFFERENT 

sorts of sheet iron and steel; all steel 
but Wood's Patent- Planished char- 
coal iron — the modern version of old- 
fashioned Russia. 

It was good iron, that Russia! No 
better than Wood's; but how did they 
ever make it in Russia? 

We make Wood's; some think it 
the better, and some prefer Russia. 

Quick service. Return a whole 
sheet for an inch of fault. 

American Sheet Steel Company, New York 

Representatives for Canada 

B. & S. H. Thompson & Company 

53 St. Sulpice Street 

Montreal 



58 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




A R I STOS 

H. Boker & Co.'s 

Roller-Guard Safety Razor 

BRAND with finest hollow-ground blades. 

Best Combination of Handiness and Quality. 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



January 1, 1904. 

These prices are tor such qualities and 
quantities as are visually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

TIN, 

I.anili and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. £29 50 S30 50 
TINPLATES. 
Charcoal Plates— Bright. 

M.L.S., equal to Bradley— Per box. 

I C, usual sizes $6 50 

IX " 8 00 

I X X " 9 50 

Famous, equal to Bradley - 

I C 6 75 

IX 8 25 

I X X 9 75 

Raven and Vulture tirades - 

I C, usual sizes 4 50 

IX " 5 50 

IX X " 6 30 

IXX X " 7 50 

"Domini. mi Crown Best" Doiible 

Coated, Tissued p er hox 

IC 550 ' 

IX li 50 

IXX 7.50 

" Allaway's Best "■ Standard Quality. 

IC 4 50 

IX 5 50 

IXX 6 50 

Coke Plates— Bright. 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C., usual size, 14x20 3 65 

I.C., special sizes, base 3 90 

20x28 7 75 ' 

Charcoal Plates— Terne. 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheets .... 6 75 7 50 

IX., Terne Tin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Rniler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X X, 14x56, 50 sheet bxs. ) 

" 14x60, " > .... 7 00 

" 14x65, " > 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 7 50 

" " 26 " 8 00 

IRON AND STEEL. 

Common bar, per 100 lb 2 00 

Refined " " 2 40 

Horseshoe Iron " 2 40 

Hoop steel, H to 3-in. base 2 90 

Sleigh shoe steel, 2 10 

Tire steel 2 30 2 50 

Reeled machinery 3 00 

Toe calk steel 2 85 3 00 

T.Firth&Co.'s tool steel, perlb 12i 13 

Jessop's tool steel 14 

Mortons tool steel 12J 13 

Black Diamond and " B.C. ' 

tool steel 10 Oil 

Chas. Leonard's tool steel .... 08 09 

Jonas & Colver's tool steel. ... 10 20 

" "Air Hardening" .... 70 

Drill steel, per lb 08 10 

Russia Iron- 
Genuine ■ 11 

Imitation Dom. Crown 06 

STEEL BOILER PLATE. 

1 in 2 50 2 60 

3-16in". 260 2 70 

{ in. and thicker 2 50 2 00 



BABBIT METAL. 

"Tandem," A perlb. 27 

B " H21 

C " 115 

Frictionless Metal ' 23 

Syracuse Smelting Works : 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Government, " 44 

Tough, " 40 

Hard, " 40 

Dynamo 30 

Special 25 

Harmony 22 

Car Box 20 

Extra >... 15 

The Canada Metal Co. : 

Imperial, genuine, 40 

Metallic 30 

Hercules 20 

Star 15 

No. 1 12 

No. 2 10 

No. 3 06 

No. 4 05 

Geo. Langwell & Sim. 

No. 1 08 

No. 2 07 

X.. 3 05} 

K\tra 09!, 

BLACK SHEETS. 

Montreal. Toronto 

10 and 16 gauge 2 25 2 55 

18 gauge 2 30 2 80 

20 " 230 2 80 

22 to 24 gauge 2 35 2 70 

26 " 2 40 2 80 

28 2 40 2 90 

COPPER WIRE. 
Discount, 50 percent. 

CANADA PLATES. 

Ordinary 2 65 

All bright 3 50 

Galvanized Canada Plates- 
Ordinary. Dom. 
Crown. 

18x24x52 4 25 4 35 

" 60 4 50 4 60 

20x28x80 8 50 8 70 

" 94 9 00 9 20 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. Queens 
Fleur-de-Lis. Comet Bell. Head 

16 gauge 3 65 

18 to 24 gauge . . 3 75 3 75 3 75 4 05 

26 " .. 4 00 4 00 3 90 4 25 

28 . . 4 25 4 25 4 05 4 50 

American brands, S4 40 for 28 gauge. 

Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 

CHAIN. 

Proof coil, 3-16 in , per 100 lb 

i " 6 10 

5-16 " 4 70 

" i " 400 

7-16 " 3 80 

£ " 3 70 

9-16 " 3 55 

| " 3 35 

| " 3 30 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 percent. 

Cow ties 41) p.c. 

Tie out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, discount 

35 p.c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

COPPER. 

Ingot. Per 100 lb. 

Casting 13 50 14 00 

Bars. 

Cut lengths, round, i to I in. . 23 00 25 00 
" round and square, 

1 to 2 inches.... 23 00 25 00 



Sheet. 
Plain, 16 oz., 14x48 and 14x60 .... 20 00 

Plain, 14 oz 21 00 

Tinned copper sheet 24 00 

Planished 32 00 

Braziers (in sheets). 

4x6 ft., 25 to 30 lb. each, per lb 22 

" 35 to 45 " •' .... 21 

" 50-lb. and above " .... 20 

BOILER AND T.K. PITTS. 

Plain tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 

BRASS. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 per cent 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 • 23 

Tubing, base, per lb 23 J 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 6 00 6 25 

Domestic " " 

ZINC SHEET. 

5-cwt. casks 6 15 6 50 

Part casks 6 50 7 00 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 3 20 3 30 

Bar, perlb 05 

Sheets, 2J lb. sq. ft., by roll 06i 

Sheets, 3 to 6 1ft " 06 

Note.— Cut sheets ic. per lb., extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists at 7c. 
per lb. and 35 p.c lis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8.ft. lengths, lists at, 8c. 

ANTIMONY. 

Cookson's perlb. 7 50 8 0i 

SHOT. 
Common, $6.50 per 100 lb.: chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb.: buck, seal and ball, S7.50. Dis- 
count, 17J p.c. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms, 3 p.c. cash, freights equalized. 

PLUMBING GOODS. 

BATH TUBS. 

Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 20 per cent, off revised list. 

BATHS. 

Standard Enameled. 

5J-ft. rolled rim, 1st quality : 23 00 

5J 2nd " 20 00 

CLOSETS. Net. 

Plain York or Ontario Syphon Jet... $9 60 

Emb. " " " . 10 20 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Simplex Syphon Jet 9 00 

Emb. " " " . . 7 50 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic, plain. . 6 00 

Low " " " emb. .. 6 50 

Plain Richelieu 4 25 

Emb. " 4 50 

Connections 1 25 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins, P.O., 14-in 63 

Basins, oval, 17 x 14-in 1 50 

Basins, " 19 x 15-in 2 0c 

IRON PIPE. 
Black pipe Per 100 feet. 

J inch 3 25 

1 '■ 2 30 2 4C 

i " 2 55 2 55 

i " 2 85 2 85 

3 " 3 65 3 65 

1 " 5 20 

1} " 7 35 

H " 8 95 

2 " 12 55 

2j " 17 25 

3 " 22 75 

3} " 28 75 

4 " 35 25 

U " 4100 

. " 44 00 

6 " 57 5(1 

59 



Galvanized pipe — 

i inch 3 20 

I " 3 45 

I " 3 90 

' ' 5 no 

1 " 7 20 

H " inn:. 

IS ' 12 20 

2 " 10 85 

Malleable Fittings Discount 15 p.c. 

1 last linn Fittings- 
On unions, 55 per cent. : on nipples, 60pei 

cent.; headers and flanged unions, 52.'. per 
cent : bushings, pings and other than stand- 
ard 57' per cent. 

PLU1LBEKS' BRASS GOODS. 

Standard Compression work, dis. 60 per cent. 
Cushion work, discount 50 per cent. . 

Fuller work, discount 65 per cent 

6 dozen lots and over of the above, extra dis- 
count 10 per cent. 

Lever handle Stops and Waste, discount 6Q 

per cent. With, in lots of 2 dozen and over 

an extra discount of 10 per -nt. 
Olobe, i •'■/!■ ...i,i Check Valves, discount 

55 per cent. 
Standard Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 

discount 00 per cent. 
Radiator Valves discount 55 per cent. 
Standard Radiator Valves, discount 60 per 

cent. 
Patent Quick - Opening Valves, discount 05 

per cent. 

No. 1 coinpicssii.n bath CO' k net 2 00 

No. 4 " " " 2 00 

No .7 Fuller's " 2 20 

No. 4J, " " 2 35 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

cock, hot and cold per doz. 15 00 

Patent Compression Cushion, bath 

sock, No. 2208 2 25 

Square head brass cocks, discount 55 percent 

" iron " "50 to 60 " 

Competition Globe, Angle and Check Valve ' 

discount 70 per cent. 
Thompson Smoke-test Machine $25.00 

RANGE BOILEHS. 

Dominion, 30 gallon net 5 50 

35 " " 6 .-,n 

40 " " 7 so ( 

Ronald s Galvanized, 30 gallon, " 7 40 , 
35 " " 8 40 
40 " " 9 Kit I 

Copper, 30 gallon " 22 00 

' 35 " " 24 00 

40 " " 28 00 II 

Discount off copper boilers 15 per cent. 
SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS. 
Light soil pipe, discount, 50 and 10 per cenl " 

fittings, discount 50 and in p . 
Med. and Extra heavy pipe and fittings, dis, .V. 
and 5 per cent. * 

7 and 8-in. pipe, discount 40 ami .'. per rent. 

SOLDER. Per ||, 

Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 19 

Bar, half-and-half, commercial 18 f 

Refined o 18 

Wiping 17 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

BLUESTONE. ' 

Casks, for spraying 5 50 

100-lb. lots do perlb ." OS 

COLORS IN OIL. 
25-lb. tins. Standard Quality. 

Venetian red, per lb 03* 05 

Chrome yellow 12 14 ,1 

Oolden ochre 07 10 

French " 06 r 

Marine black 04 u 

Chrome green 10 

French Imperial green 14 " 

Signwriters black ' 16 

Prober 064 06 

Sienno 04 M u? 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THOS. GOLDSWORTHY & SONS 



EMERY { 



MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

Oloth 
Corn 

Flour 



We carry all numbers of Corn and Flour Emery in io-pound packages, from 8 to 140, 
in stock. Emery Cloth, Nos. OO., O., F., FF., 1 to 3. 

JAMES HUTTON & CO., Wholesale Agents for Canada, Montreal. 



COLORS, DRY. 

Common ochre, bbls 1 15 1 30 

Yellow ochre (J.F.L.S) bbls 2 00 

Brussels ochre 2 00 

Venetian red, bbl 150 2 25 

English oxides, per cwt 3 00 3 25 

American oxides, bbls 1 25 2 75 

Canadian oxides, bbls 1 25 1 75 

Super magnetic oxides, 93 p.c. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" umber, " " .... 08 10 

Raw umber 08 10 

Drop black, pure 10 

Chrome yellow, pure 18 

Chrome greens, pure per lb . . 09 10 

Golden ochre 03 04 

Ultramarine blue, in 28-lb. 

boxes, per lb 06 12 

Fire proof mineral, per 100 lb 1 00 

Genunie Eug. Litharge, per lb 07 

Mortar color, per 100 lb 1 25 1 5(, 

Pure Indian red. No. 45, lb. . . 08 0)J 

Whiting (common), bbl 55 50 

English vermilion in 30-lb. bgs. ... 85 

CASTOR OIL. 

British,lst.qual,incases,perlb 084 094 

" small lots .... 10 10§ 

COD OIL, ETC. 

Cod oil, per gal 50 55 

Pure olive 1 40 

" neatsfoot 90 

WHITE LEAD. Per 100 lb. 

Pure 4 75 

No. 1 4 50 

No. 2 4 25 

No. 3 3 874 

No. 4 3 50 

Munro's Select Flake White 4 75 

Elephant and Decorators'Pure 4 75 

Brandram's Genuine . - 

" Decorative 

" No. 1 

" Monarch " brand 

Decorator's Pure 4 75 

Sterling Pure 5 00 

Island City Pure 5 00 

Essex Genuine 5 25 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 4 75 5 00 

Ramsay's Exterior 4 50 4 75 

RED LEAD. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $4 75 $5 00 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, " 5 25 5 50 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt ... 4 00 4 25 

No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt . 4 25 4 50 

WHITE ZINC. 

Extra Red Seal 06 08 

No. I 05J 07 

^No. 2 05 06 

DRY WHITE LEAD. 

Pure, casks .' . 

Pure, kegs 

No. 1, casks 

No. 1, kegs 

PREPARED PAINTS. 
In J, J and 1-gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 120 

Second qualities, per gallon 1 00 

Barn (in bbls.) 60 90 

The Sherwiu-WillianiB paints 1 40 

Canada Paint Co. s pure 1 25 

Toronto Lead & Color Cos pure 125 

Sanderson Pearcy's pure 1 20 

Standard Co.'s "New Era." 130 

"Globe" barn 60 70 

Francis-Frost Co.'s "Ark" B'd 125 

" British Navy deck 1 50 

Henderson & Hotts's "Anchor" 135 

Globe Paint Co.'s mixed 130 

" barn and bridge 75 

Ramsay's paints, Pure, per gal 1 20 

Thistle, ' r .... 1 00 

Outside, bbls 55 65 

Island ( it y House Paint 1 25 

Floor " 1 25 

National 1 05 



PUTTY. 

Bulk in bbls 1 70 

Bulk in less quantity 1 95 

Bladders in bbls 2 00 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose 2 25 

25-lb. tins 2 25 

1241b. tins 2 50 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 100 lb. 2 50 

VARNISHES. 

In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. Net. 

Carriage, No. 1 1 50 1 60 

Pale durable body 4 10 4 25 

rubbing 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, japan 1 50 1 60 

No. 1 brown japan 85 90 

Elastic oak 1 50 

Furniture, extra 110 125 

No. 1 90 100 

Hard oil finish 135 150 

Light oil finish 160 170 

Damar 175 2 00 

Shellac, white 2 40 2 50 

orange 2 30 2 40 

Turpentine, brown japan 1 10 1 20 

black japan 110 120 

,! No. 1. 85 90 

Elastilite varnish, 1 gal. can, each. . 2 00 

Granitine floor finish, per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels ; size 1, $1.20 ; 

size 2, 70c. ; size 3, 40c. each. 
Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish, assorted 
case, from to 1 gal., $2.50. 

GLUE. 

Common 08 09 

French medal 10 14 

White, extra 18 22 

Gelatine 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 

Ground 12 16 

Cologne, genuine 

HARDWARE. 

AMMUNITION. 

Cartridges. 

B. B. Caps Dominion, 50 and 5 per cent. 

Rim Fire Pistol, discoimt 40 p.c, American. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dominion, 50 and 5 p.c. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, 10 p.c, Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Domin- 
ion, 30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dominion, 15 per cent. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer- 
ican, add 5 per cent, to list. B.B. Caps; 
discount 40 per cent., American. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
"Dominion" grades, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 per cent, advance on list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 per cent.; American, $1.60. 

Wads. per lb. 

Best thicK white felt wadding, in |- 

bags $ 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

4-lb. bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge C 25 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 
")aoh. 8 auge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7 and 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 " 1 65 

5 and 6 " 1 90 

60 



ADZES. 
Discount 20 per cent. 

ANVILS. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 10J 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 09| 

Brook's, 80-lb. and over llj 

AUGERS. 
Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 per cent, off list. 

AXES. 
Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 7 00 10 00 

Double bit, " 10 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes 6 25 7 00 

Splitting Axes 7 00 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 50 10 00 

AMERICAN AXE AND TOOL CO. 

Red Ridge, boys', handled 5 75 

" • hunters , 5 25 

AXLE GREASE 

Ordinary, per gross 5 7o 6 00 

Best quality 13 00 15 00 



BELLS. 

Hand. 



Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

Cow. 
American make, discount 63§ per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 46 per cent. 
Farm. 

American, each 1 25 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

BELLOWS. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount '0 per cent 

BELTING. 
Extra, 60 per cent. 
Standard, 60 and 10 per cent.' 
No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 aud 10 per 

cent. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 per cent. 
BITS. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings Gen., net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 474 to 50 per cent. 
Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BLIND AND RED STAPLES. 

All sizes, per lb 07} 12 

bolts and nuts Per cent. 

Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list) 

" 3-16 audi 60 

" 3-16 and | 55 and 5 

" 7-16 and up . . . . 55 

" full sq. ($2.40 list) 60 
" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 60 

Machine Bolts, all sizes, g and 

less 60 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up 55 and 5 

Plough Bolts 55 and 5 

Blank Bolts 55 and 5 

Bolt Ends 55 and 5 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 70 

Coach Screws, cone point 70 

Nuts, square, ad sizes, 4c. per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4}c. per lb. off. 
Stove Rods, per lb., 54 to 6c. 
BOOT CALKS. 

Small and medium, ball per M. 4 25 

Small heel " 4 50 

BRIGHT WIRE GOODS. 

Discount 624 per cent. 



BROILERS. 

Light, discount 65 to 674 per cent. 
Reversible, discount 65 to 674 per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz. , discount 374 per cent. 

Henis, No. 8 per doz 6 00 

Henis, No. 9 " .... 7 00 

Queen City " .... 7 50 

BUTCHERS' CLEAVERS. 

German per doz. 6 00 1100 

American " 12 00 20 00 

BUTCHER KNIVES. 

Bailey's per doz. 60 6 30 

BUILDING PAPER, ETC. 

Tarred Felt, per 100 lb 1 85 

Ready rooting, 2-ply, not under 45 lb. 

per roll 90 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 65 lb., 

per roll 1 15 

Carpet Felt per"ton 4o OC 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 35 00 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 6q. ft. 40 

Tar " " 400 " 50 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 55 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 65 

O. K. &I. X. L... " 400 " 70 

Resin-sized " 400 " 45 

Oiled Sheathing.... " 600 " 100 

Oiled " .... " 400 " 70 

Roof Coating, in barrels per gal. 17 

Roof " small packages " 25 

Refined Tar per barrel 5 00 

Coal Tar " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

Roofing Pitch per 100 lb. 1 10 

BULL RINGS. 
Copper, $2.00 for 24-inch, and $1.90 'or 2-inch. 

BUTTS. 

Wrought Brass, net revised list. 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, discount 60 per cent 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, discount 65, 10 and 24 per cent. 
Loose Pin, discount 65, 10 and 24 per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, discouut 70, 70 and5 percent 
Gen. B ronzed per pair 40 65 

CARPET STRETCHERS. 

American per doz. 1 00 1 50 

Bullard's " .... 6 50 

CASTORS. 

Bed, new list, discount 55 to 574 per cent. 
Plate, discount 524 to 574 Per cent. 

CATTLE LEADERS. 
Nos. 31 and 32 per gross 8 50 9 50 

CHALK. 

Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump.- per cwt. 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon per gross 14 18 

CHISELS. 

Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 
Warnock's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
P. S. & W. Extra, discount 60 aud 10 per cen 

CHURN 

Revolving Churns, metal frames — No. 0, S8 
No. 1, $8.50; No. 2, $9.00; No. 3, $10.00 
No. 4, $12.00; No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto 
wood frames, 20c. each less than the above 
Discounts; Factories, 30 and 30 per cent 
f.o.b.Ottawa, Kingston and Montreal, 40 and 
15 per cent. Terms 4 months or 3 per cent, 
cash in 30 days. 

Churn frames, including bearings, levers, etc. 
Nos. 0, 1, 2 and 3, wood, $2.40; and 4 and 
5, $2.65. Metal frames, 25c. extra. D's 
count 15 per cent., net 30 days. 

CLIPS. 

Axle, discount 65 per cent. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



44 Same Quality as Last" 

These are the words used by our old customers when ordering more goods, and their meaning 
is easily understood. 

Our Building Papers, Roofing Felts and Wire Edged Ready Roofing are made to give 
satisfaction to the User, and those are the kind of goods the Dealer wants. 



The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 



Toronto and Montreal 



COMPASSES, DIVIDERS, ETC. 

American, discount 62i to 65 per cent. 

CONDUCTOR PIPE. 

Plain or Corrugated. 

2-inch per 100 feet 3 00 

3 " " " 4 00 

4 " " " 5 25 

5 " " " 6 75 

6 " " " 9 00 

CRADLES, GRAIN. 
Canadian, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 
CROSSCUT SAW HANDLES. 

S. k D., No. 3 per pair 174 

S. & D., " 5 r ' 22J 

S. &D., " 6 " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

DOOR SPRINGS. 

Torrey's Rod (15 p.c. ), per doz 2 00 

Coil " 88 160 

English " 2 00 4 00 

DRAW KNIVES. 

Coach and Wago», discount 50 and 10 pet 

cent. 
Carpenters' discount 60 and 10 per oent. 

DRILLS. 

Hand and Breast. 
Millar's falls, per doz., net list. 

DRILL BITS. 

Morse, discount 374 to 40 per cent. 
Standard, discount 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

FAUCETS. 

Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per cent. 

EAVETROUGHS. 

10-inch per 100 ft, 10 

elbows (stovepipe.) 

and 6-inch, common per doz. 1 20 

7-inch " 1 35 

Polished, 15c. per dozen extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 

Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 70 and 10 per cent. 

Arcade 70 " 10 

Kearney & Foot 70 " 10 

Disstons 70 " 10 

American 70 " 10 " 

J. Barton Smith 70 " 10 " 

McCleUan 70 " 10 

Eagle 70 " 10 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 

Royal 80 

Globe 70 to 75 

Black Diamond. 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 per 

cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 274 per cent. 
Nicholson File Co.'s " Simplicity " file handle, 

per gross 85c. to $1.50 

GLASS. 



Window. 


Box Price. 








Star 


D. 


Diamond 


Size United 


Per 


Per 


Per Per 


Inches. 


50 ft, 


100 ft. 


50 ft. 100 ft. 


Under 26 




3 10 




6 75 


26 to 40 




3 30 




7 25 


41 to 50 




3 70 




8 75 


51 to 60 




4 00 




10 00 


61 to 70 




5 00 




. 11 51 


71 to 80 




5 30 




. 12 50 


81 to 85 








. 14 00 


86 to 90 








. 16 50 


91 to 95 








. 18 00 


96 to 100 








20 00 



A discount of 25 per cent, is offered on 
"Double Diamond." 



Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley s. discount 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33 . . . each 1 65 2 40 



Rope, f-inch per gross 

Rope,} " " .... 9 00 

Rope, § to |-inch .... " .... 14 00 

Leather, 1-inch per doz. 3 874 4 00 

Leather, li " " 5 15 5 20 

Web " 187 2 45 

HAMMERS. 

Nail. 
Maydole's, discount 5 to 10 per cent, Canadian 
discount 25 to 274 per cent. 
Tack. 

Magnetic per doz. 1 10 1 20 

Sledge. 

Canadian per lb. 074 085 

Ball Pean. 

English and Canadian, per lb. 22 25 

HANDLES. 

Axe, 2nd growth, per doz. net 3 00 4 00 

tore door perdoz. 100 150 

Fork. 

C. & B., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 

Hoe. 

C. & B., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 
Saw. 

American per dor X 00 1 25 

Plane. 

American per gross 3 15 3 75 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 
Cross-Cut Saws. 

Canadian per pair 13J 

hangers. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 585 600 

Stearns, 4-inch 5 00 

" 5-inch 6 50 

Lane's covered — 

No. 11, 5-foot run 8 40 

No. 114, 10-foot run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-foot run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-foot run 2100 

Lane's O.N. T. track, per foot .... 045 

HARVEST TOOLS. 

Discount 60 per cent. 

HATCHETS. 

Canadian, discount 40 to 424 per cent. 

HAT ENAMEL. 

Henderson & Potts' "Anchor Brand' 

HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, discount 161 Per cent. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 064 

5-in., " 06f 

6-in„ ' 06 

8-in., " 051 

10-in., " 054 

Light T and strap, discount 65 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge— 

6 to 10 in per 100 lb 4 50 

12 in. up " 3 25 

Spring per gro. pairs 10 50 

HOES. 

Garden, Mortar, etc., discount 60 per cent. 
Planter per doz. 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE. 

Discount 45 and 5 per cent. 
HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 
Birdcage perdoz. 50 110 



Clothesline " 27 63 

Harness " 72 88 

Hat and coat per gro. 1 00 3 00 

Chandelier per doz. 50 1 00 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought hooks and staples Canadian dis- 
count 474 Per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and coat, discount 45 per cent. 

Belt per 1,000 .... 60 

Screw, bright, discount 55 per cent. 

HORSE NAILS. 

"C" brand, 40, 10 and 74 per cent, off list | Oval 
"M" brand, 55, per cent. (head 

Countersunk, 55 per cent. 
"Monarch," 50 and 75 per cent. 
' ' Peerless " 50 per cent. dis. 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 
No. 2 No. 1 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 

Light, medium and heavy 3 65 3 90 

Snow shoes 3 90 4 15 

Steel Shoes. 

XL, sizes 1 to 5 5 35 

Light, No. 2 and larger 3 80 

No. 1 and smaller 4 05 

Featherweight, all sizes to 4 5 35 

Toeweight, all sizes 1 to 4 6 60 

JAPANNED WARE. 

Discount <«id 5 per cent, off list, June 1899 

ICE PICKS. 

Star perdoz. 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 

Brass spun 75 per cent, discount off new list. 

Copper per lb. 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 per cent. 

KEYS. 

Lock, Canadian dis. 40 to 40 and 10 per cent. 
Cabinet, trunk and padlock, 
American per gross — 60 

KNOBS. 

Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin per doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine .... " 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. & L. 

screw per gross 1 30 4 00 

White door knobs per doz 1 00 

HAY KNIVES. 
Net prices. 

LAMP WICKS. 

Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast perdoz. 7 00 

No. 3, "Wright's" " 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner. ... 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast " 9 00 

No. " 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined perdoz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized " 1 87 3-85 

King, wood " 2 75 2 90 

King, glass " 4 00 4 50 

All glass " 50 90 

LINES. 

Fish per gross 1 05 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LAWN MOWERS. 

Woodyatt, 12-in. wheel 7 50 

Star " 5 50 

Daisy (net) 2 45 

Philadelphia, 12-in. wheel 6 50 

Ontario, " 14 25 

Discount, 50 per cent. 

Maxwell & Sons : 

10»/ 2 -in. high wheel 7 50 10 00 

9-in 5 50 6 25 

8-in 49 5 50 

Discount 50 per cent. 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, 40 to 40 and 10 per cent. 
Russell & Erwin per doz. 3 00 3 25 

61 



Cabinet. 
Eagle, discount 30 per cent. 

Padlocks. 

English and Am per doz. 50 6 00 

Eagle, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 

Iron and Brass. 
Flat head, discount 25 per rent. 
Round head, discount 20 per cent. 

MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' perdoz. 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory, " 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae " 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian per doz. 5 50 6 50 

MEAT CUTTERS. 

American, discount 33J per cent. 

German, 15 per cent. 

Gem each 1 15 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 

Discount 25 per cent. 

NAILS. Cut. Wire. 

2d and 3d 3 45 3 45 

3d 3 10 3 12 

4and5d 2 85 2 95 

6and7d 2 75 2 80 

8 and 9d 2 60 2 60 

10 and 12d 2 55 2 55 

16and20d 2 50 2 50 

30, 40, 50 and 60d (base) 2 45 2 45 

Cut nails in carlots 5c. less. 

Wire nails in carlots are $2.40. 

Steel cut nails 10c. extra. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, discount 75 per cent. 

Coopers' nails, discount 30 per cent. 

NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 1 75 50 

NAIL SETS. 

Square, round and octagon, 

per gross 3 38 

Diamond 100 ? 

POULTRY NETTING. 

2-in. Mesh, 19 w.g., dis. 60 percent. 
2-in. Mesh, 16 w.g. and heavier, 50 p.c. 

OAKUM. 

U. S. Navy per 100 lb 6 76 

Plumbers " .... 3 00 

OILERS. 

McClary ? Model galvanized i 

oil can, with vjump, 5 gallon, 

per dozen ... 10 00 

Zinc and tin, discount 50, 50 and 10 per cent. | 

Copper per doz. 1 25 3 50 

Brass " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, discount 25 per cent . 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 

Dufferin pattern pails, discount 45 per c* nf 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 

Discount 40 per cent off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, discount 40 per cent 
6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails, dis. 40 per cent. 
Creamer cans, discount 40 per cent. I 

Perdozen 6 00 » 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head per gross 1 35 1 50 

Brass head " 40 100 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 per cent. 

PINE TAR. 

5 pint in tins per gross ... 7 80 

i " " " .... 9 60 >■ 

PLANES. 

Wood bench, Canadian discount 40 per cent., 

American discount 50 per cent. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American, 375 to 

40 per cent. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Hammerless Shot Gun 

GUARANTEED FOR NITRO POWDERS 



Grade K. Made with 
Remington blued 
steel barrels. 




Send for Catalogue containing 
complete description of Guns, 
$25.00 to 8250.00, mailed free. 



Grade K E D Made 
with Damascus 
barrels and Auto- 
matic Ejector. 



IVIIIMOTOIM ARMS CO., 

SOLD BY LEADING CANADIAN DEALERS. 



313-317 Broadway, New York. 
86-88 First St., San Francisco, Cal. 
NOT RETAILED BV THE MANUFACTURERS. 



WON, N.Y., 



PLANE IRONS, 

English per do/.. 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

Button's genuine, per doz. pairs, discount 

374 to 40 per cent. 
Button's imitation perdoss. 5 00 9 00 

German " 60 60 

PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount 20 per cent. 



Hothouse per doz. 55 

Axle " 22 

Screw " 27 

Awning " 35 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 1 80 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 

PUNCHES. 

Saddler's per doz. 

Pnii(iiicNirfl " 



1 00 

33 

1 01) 

2 50 



3 60 
2 10 



1 00 
9 00 



1 85 
15 00 

72 

1 00 



Conductor's. 

tinners', solid per set, 

" hollow per inch 

ItAKES. 

Wood per doz. net 1 20 up. 

RAZORS. per doz. 

4 00 18 00 



4 00 
7 50 

12 50 
3 60 
7 00 
6 00 

10 00 



8 50 



18 00 

11 00 
15 00 

10 00 

12 00 

12 00 

11 00 
15 00 
10 75 

13 00 
13 50 
13 50 
10 50 



Elliot's 

Geo. Butler's & Co. 's 

Boker's 

" King Gutter 

Wade & Butcher's 

Theile k Quack's 

Bailey s 

Bailey's Brantford "'. 

Carbo Magnetic 

Griffon Barber's Favorite 

Griffon No. 65 

Griffon Safety Razors 

Grjffon Stropping Machines. . 
Lewis Bros.' " Klean Kntter" 

REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURKS. 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 and 

10 per cent. 
Iron Burrs, discount 55 per cent- 
Extras on Iron Rivets in lib. cartons, Jc. 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in J-lb cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets, with usual proportion buns, 4.. 

per cent, discount. Cartons, lc. per lb. 

extra, net. 
Copper Burrs only, discount 30 and 10 per i ent. 
Kxtras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets, J-lb. 

cartons, lc. per lb. 

RIVET SETS. 

Canadian, discount 35 to 37J per cent. 

rope, ETC. 

Sisal om 

Pure Manilla 14; 

"British" Manilla 12 

( lofton, 3-16 inch and larger 00 

" 5-32 inch 00 

J inch 00 

Russia Deep Sea 15 

Jute 08 

I,ath Yarn, single , 11 

double Hi 

Sisal bed cord, 48 feet per doz. 65 

" 60 feet " 80 

" 72 feet " 95 

RULES. 
Boxwood, discount 55 per cent 
Ivory, discount 374 to 40 P er Oent 

SAI> irons 
Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished. ...per set 70 
No. 50, nickle-plated, 80 

SAM) ANU EMERY PAPER. 

B. 4 A. sand, discount, 40 and 5 per cent 
Emery, discount 40 per cent. 
Garnet (Rurton's), 5 to 10 percent, advance 
in list 



SAP SPOUTS. 

Bronzed iron with hooks per 1,000 9 50 . 

SAWS. 

Hand, Disston's, discount 124 per cent. 

S. k D., discount 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's. . ..per foot 35 55 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent, on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete each 75 2 75 

" frame only 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional per 100 lb 2 25 

Solid " .... 1 75 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 22 25 

SAW SETS. per doz. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets, No. 1 Woodyatt (Morrill) 4 25 
X-Cut Sets, No. 3 Woodyatt (Morrill) 9 50 

SCALES. 

Gurney Standard, 40 per cent. 

Gurney Champion, 50 per cent. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne — 

Imperial Standard, discount 40 per cenc. 
Weigh Beams, discount 35 per cent- 
Champion Scales, discount 50 per cent. 

Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per cent. 
" Dominion, discount 55 per cent 

" Richelieu, discount 55 per cent. 

Warren's new Standard, discount 40 percent. 
" " Champion, discount 50 per cent. 

" Weighbeams, discount 35 per cent. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's ... per doz. 65 1 00 

SCREEN DOORS. 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 
stained, 4-in. style per doz. 6 80 

Common doors,2 or 3 panel, yellow and 
green stained, 4-in. style — per doz. 7 00 

( ' nnmon doors, 2 or 3 panel, in natural 
colors, oil finish per doz. 8 15 

3-in. style 20c. per dozen less. 

SCREWS. 

Wood, F. H., bright and steel, discount 87J 

per cent. 
Wood, R. H, bright, dis. 82J per cent. 

" F. H., brass, dis. 80 percent. 

" R. H., " . dis. 75 per cent. 

' F. H, bronze, dis. 75 percent. 
' R. H., " dis. 70 per cent- 
Drive Screws, dis. 874 per cent. 
Bench, wood per doz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, case hardened, dis. GO per cent. 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent. 

SCYTHES. 

Per doz. net 6 00 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 

Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

SHEARS. 

Bailey Cutlery Co., full nickeled, discou 

and 2J per cent- 
Bailey Cutlery, Japan Handles, discount 671 

per cent. 
Seymour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 

Canadian, discount 45 per cent. 

SINKS. 

Cast iron, 16x24 85 

18 x 30 1 00 

18x36 1 40 

SNAPS. 

Harness, German, discount 25 per cent. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 11 50 

SOLDERING [RONS. 

1. U -lb per lb 37 

2-lb. or over " 34 

squares. 

Iron, No. 493 per doz. 2 40 2 55 

" No. 494 " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, discount 60 to 60 and 5 per cent. 
Try and Bevel, discount 50 to 52J per cent. 

STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, discount 75 and 12.J per cent, off re- 
vised list. 
Returned, discount 75 per cent, off revised list. 

62 



STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 00 

Plain 2 80 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 per cent. 

STOCKS AND DIES. 

American discount 25 per cent. 

STONE. 

Washita per lb. 28 60 

Hindostan " 06 07 

slip " 09 09 

Labrador " .... 13 

Axe " .... 15 

Turkey " .... 50 

Arkansas " 150 

Water-of-Ayr " .... 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, 2-in.,40to2001b.,perton .... 25 00 

" under 40 lb., " .... 28 00 

" under 2 in. thick, " .... 29 00 

STOYEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths .... 7 00 
7inch " " .... 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 

No. 4, 3doz. in-case. .net cash 4 80 

No. 6, 3 doz. in ase.. " .... 8 40 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Carpet taiks, blued 80 and 15 

tinned 80 and 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only 80 

" \ weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 and 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85, 12J and 125 

" brush, blued and tinned 

bulk ....: 70 

Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 and 12$ 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacKS 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 52J 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in doz- 
ens only 60 

Zinc glaziers' points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers.. 90 and 10 

bulk.... 40 

Clinch and duck rivets 45 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin per doz. 2 75 5 00 

English. Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Chestermans each 90 2 85 

steel each 80 8 00 

tinners' snips. 
Itailcy's, discount 25 per cent. 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, discount 75 to 75 and 10 
per cent. 

TiiArs (steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, discount 25 per cent- 
Game, H. k N P. S. k W., 65 per cent. 
Game, steel, 72J, 75 per cent. 

TROWELS. 

Disston's, discount 10 per cent. 

German per doz. 4 75 6 00 

S. k D., discount 35 per cent. 

TWINES 

Bag, Russian per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 19 

. > r " 4-ply 23 

Mattress per lb. 33 45 

Staging " 27 35 

VISES. 

Wright's 131 

Brook's 12J 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

K " " No. 2 5 50 

Saw Vise « 50 9 00 

Columbia Hardware Co. 
Blacksmiths' (discount) 60 percent. 

parallel (discount ) 45 per cenl . 



ENAMELLED WARE. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White 
discount 50 per cent 

Diamond, Famous, Premier, discount 50 and 
10 per cent 

Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, discount 
50, 10 and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 

Smooth Steel Wire. 

No. 0-9 gauge $2 50 

10 " 6c. extra. 

11 " 12c. 

12 " 20c. 

13 " 30c. 

14 " 40c. " 

15 " 55c. 

16 " 70c. 

Add 60c. for coppering and $2 for tinning. 
Extra net per 100 lb. —Oiled wire 10c, 
spring wire $1.25, special hay haling wire 30c, 
best steel wire 75c, bright soft drawn 15c, 
charcoal (extra quality) 81.25, packed in casks 
or cases 15.-., bagging and papering 10c, 50 
and 100-lb. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. bundles 
15c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in lib. 
hanks, 50c, in J-lb. hanks 75c, in J-lb. 
hanks $1. 

Fine Steel Wire, discount 25 per cent. 
List of extras: In 100-lb. lots: No. 17, 
$5— No. 18, 85.5ft— No. 19, $6-No. 20, $6.65— 
No. 21, $7— No. 22, $7.30— No. 23, $7,65— No. 
24, $8-No. 25, 89-No. 26, $9.50-No. 27, 
SlU-No. 28, $ll-No. 29, $12— No. 30, $13— 
No.31, $14- No. 32, $15— No. 33, $16— No. 34, 
$17. Extras net— tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, 
$2 -Nos. 26-31, $4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 
5c— oiling, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles, 15c— in 5 
and 10-lb. bundles, 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 25c 
—in J-lb. banks, 38c— in }-lb. hanks, 50c— 
packed in casks or cases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c. 
Brass wire, discount 60 per cent, off the list. 
Copper wire, discount 60 per cent, net cash 

30 days, f.o.b facrory. 
Galvanized wire, per 100 lb.— Nos. 4 and 5, 
$3.70 to $3.70-Nos. 6, 7, 8, $3.15 to $3.15 
—No. 9, $2.55 - No. 10, $3.20 to $3.20 
—No. 11, *3.25 to $3 15 — No. 12, $2.6 C 
—No. 13, $2.75— No. 14. $3.75 to $3.75— No 
15, $4.30-No. 16. $4.30. Base sizes, Nos. 
6 to 9, $2.27i f.o.b. Cleveland. In carlots 
12Jc less. 
Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand, No. 17, 
$4.65: No. 18. $2.90; No. 19, $2.60. Hollow 
6 strand. No. 17, $4.30; No. 18, $2.70; No. 
19, $2.35 ; No. 20, $2.30, f.o.b. Hamilton, 
Toronto, Montreal. 

WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 2 80 

Galvanized, plain twist 2 90 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2 55J in 
less than carlots, and $2 45 in carlots. 
COILED SPRING WIRE. 

High Carbon. No. 9 $2 75 

No. 11 3 40 

No. 12 2 96 

WIRE CLOTH. 

Painted Screen, per lOOsq. ft., net. . 1 50 
Terms, 3 per cent, off 30 days. 

WASTE COTTON. 

Colored per lb. 

White " 08 

WRENCHES. 

Acme, discount 35 to 371 per cent. 
Agricultural, discount 60 per cent. 

Coe's Genuine, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

Towers' Engineer each 2 00 7 00 

S per doz. 5 80 6 00 

G. &K.'sPipe " .... 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe each .... 3 00 

Pocket per doz. 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. 30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian " 24 00 

Royal American ' 24 00 

Sampson ' 24 00 

Lightning " 27 00 

Terms, 4 months, or 3 per cent. 30 days 

WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 

Canadian make, discount40 per ceut. 



hardware and metal 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 

(FOR CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS SEE PAGE 64.) 



Adams Co 41 

Alabastine 47 

American Shearer Mfg. Co 5 

American Sheet Steel Co 58 

American Steel and Wire Co 8 

Atkins. E. C, & Co 57 

Atlas Mfg. Co 57 

Auer Light Co 53 

Australasian Hardware 7 

Bailey Cutlery Co Inside back cover 

Barnett, G. & H. Co Outside back cover 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co 41 

Baynes Charles 57 

Berlin Robe k Clothing Co 5 

Birkett, Thos., & Son Co 2 

Bliss Mfg. Co., R 10 

Boker, H, & Co Outside front cover 59 

Booth Copper Co 57 

Bowman, John, Hardware 4: Coal Co.. 12 
Bradstreet's 10 

Canada Corundum Co 25 

Canada Foundry Co 23 

Canada Ti on Furnace Co 33 

Canada Linseed Oil Mills 45 

Canada Metal Co 23 55 

Canada Paint Co 48 

Canada Paper Co 9 

Canadian Cordage and Mfg. Co . . . 13 

Canadian Rubber Co 1 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co 33 

Cary, Philip 20 

Clare Bros. & Co 53 

Coltart k Cameron 41 

Connor, J. H., k Son 10 

Consumers' Cordage Co 4 

Contract Record 57 

Covert Mfg. Co 5 

Crosby, G. A, & Co 9 

Dana k Co 11 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co 39 

Deseron'o Iron Co 33 



Dodge Mfg. Co 

Dods, P. D., kCo 47 

Dominion Belting Co 25 

Dominion Wire Mfg. Co 8 

Donaldson. Robt., & Co 9 

Dowswell Mfg. Co 7 

Dundas Axe Works 33 

Dunlop Tire Co 5 

Empire Machine & Metal Stamping Co. 23 

Enterprise Mfg. Co 49 

Erie Spacialty Co 10 

Fairbanks Co 23 

Fairgrieve Mfg. Co 10 

Gem Cutlery Co 43 

Gibb, Alexander 10 

Globe Paint Co 47 

Grand River Metal Works 57 

Greening, B., Wirt Co 8 

Grose, Walter 34 

( fuelph Waterproof Clothing Co 5 

Gurney Foundry Co 39 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co 

Outside back cover 

Hamilton Stamp and Stencil Works.. . . 23 

Hanover Portland Cenu nt Co 57 

Harkins & Willis 40 

Harrington k Richardson Arms Co ... . 9 

Henderson k Potts Co 46 

Heinisch, R., Sons Co 9 

Hobbs Mfg. Co 51 

Hopkins k Allen Arms Co 63 

Howland, H. S., Sons & Co 19 

Hutton, James, & Co 60 

Hyde, F. & Co 33 

Imperial Tea Strainer Co 40 

Ironside. Son k Co 9 

Jackson, C. F., & Co 34 

Jardine, A. B., k Co 23 

Jenking, A. C 57 



8 JohuFCn, Iver, Arms k Cycle Works 



18 



Kay Electric Dynamo and Motor Co. . . 20 

Kemp Mfg. Co 14 

Kennedy Hardware Co 6 

Kerr Engine Co 23 

Korn, Geo. W., Razor Mfg. Co 10 

Langwell'8 Babbit. .... .Outside front cover 

Leslie, A. C, & Co „ 33 

Lewis Bros. & Co 3 

Lewis, Rice, & Son Inside front cover 

Lockerby k McComb 26 

London Robing Mill Co 7 

Lufkin Rule Co Inside back cover 

Lysaght, John Outside front cover 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co 41 

Maxwell, D., k Co 6 

Meadows, Geo. B 9 

Metallic Roofing Co 35 

Montreal Steel Works 9 

Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co 55 

Morrow, John, Machine Screw Co 34 

MacLeanPublishingCo. inside back cover 12 

McArthur, Corneille k Co 45 

McCaskill, Dougall k Co 

Outside back cover 

McClary Mfg. Co 26 

McDougall, R., Co 33 

Nerlich & Co 6 

Newman, W., k Sons 57 

Nobles & Hoare 47 

North Bros. Mfg. Co 1 

Nott, W. G. & Co. , Toronto 41 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co 33 

Oakey, John, & Sons 41 

Oneida Community 5 

Ontario Silver Co 63 

Ontario Tack Co 16 



Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co 63 

Ormsby, A. B., & Co 57 

Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Co 7 

Pnterson Mfg. Co 61 

Phillips, Charles D 57 

Pullman Mnfg. Co 03 

Ramsay, A.. & Son 53 

Remington Arms Co C2 

Ridout, Geo., & Co 40 

Russell & Erwin Mfg. Co 2 

Salyerds. E. B 63 

Samuel, M. & L., Benjamin, & Co 2 

Sessenwein Bros.. 3 

Seymour Henry T., Shear Co 63 

Sherwin-Williams Co 17 

Silberstein, A. L 1 

Slingsby, H. C 9 

Smith k Hemenway Co 63 

Solarine Metal Polish 5 

Standard Paint and Varnish Works 47 

Stanley Rule and Level Co 9 

Staunton's Limited 49 

Sterne, G. F 40 

Sun Portland Cement Co 57 

Syracuse Smelting Works 23 

Taylor-Forbes Co . . 14 

Telephone City Stoves 41 

Thompson, B. & S. H., Co 

Outside back cover 

Thorne R. E 4i 

Toronto Plate Glass Co 43 

Trees, Samuel. & Co 5 

United Factories 45 

Wallace-Barnes Co 12 

Walter, E. F, & Co 26 

Warnock. James, k Co 20 

Western Foundry Co Inside back cover 

Wright, E. T., & Co 40 

Young, C. G., k Co 9 



ONTARIO SILVER CO., 

Limited, 
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 



Manufacturers of 



FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 
ELECTRO PLATE. . . . 



Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 



"Pullman" 
Lawn Sprinkler 

is YOUR 
ORDER IN? 

Send for Folder No.14. 

PULLMAN MNFG. CO. 

Rochester. N.Y., U.S.A. 




A- 



ONTARIO WIND ENGINE # 
& PUMP CO. 




t Haniir Ave.) Toronto 



Have about 100 dozen 

HOCKEY STICKS 

left over from the manufacture of 
this season, which I can offer at 
a reduced rate such as 



Men's X, - 
" Culls, 



$1.50 
$1.10 



You will find some very good Jines 
among the Men's Culls, and Men's X are 
clear sticks. 

E. B. SALYERDS, Preston, Oat. 



HOPKINS & ALLEN RIFLE No. 722. 



The very best " First Gun" for a boy. 



Solid breech-block action. De- 
tachable barrel accurately rifled. 
Case-hardened frame. 



Shoots .22 short or long cartridge. 18-in. barrel. Weight 
3J lbs. English Walnut stock, checkered rubber butt plate. 



LIST PRICE 

Send for Catalogue No. 400 of Rifles, 
Shotguns and Revolvers 




$3.50 



THE HOPKINS & ALLEN ARMS CO., Norwich, Conn 




Canadian sample room, 
215Coristine Bldg., Montreal, 
Allen C. Jenking, Canadian 
Manager. 



IMPROVED COMPOUND 
CUTTING NIPPER. 

The most powerful one on the market, 
forged from the best tool steel, and guar- 
anteed to be free from defects. 

All parts are interchangeable, and can 
be kept as good as new. 

Send for the Green Book of Hardware 
Specialties for further \ articulars and price. 

THE SMITH, HEMENWAY & CO. 

Mfrs. of Cutlery and Hardware Specialties, 
UTICA DROP FOROE & TOOL CO., 

Mfrs. of Nippers ami Plyers, 

296 Broadway, New York, New York. 



*«•»"*>> 




SEYMOUR SHEARS 



HAVE BEEN THE 

Standard for over Half a Century. 

"QUALITY UNQUESTIONED." 
Each pair of our shears bears the above trade mark. 



SEYMOUR 
SHEAR CO. 



TRADE MARK 





Complete Line TRIMMERS, BANKERS', BARBE RS and TAIL 
ORS' SHEARS, Etc., Etc. 

Henry T. Seymour Shear Company. 

WIE3USCH & HILGER, Limited, NEW YORK, Sole Agents 
6"3 



TRADE MARK 



Latest Cata- 
logue will be 

sent in 

exchange for 

your business 

card. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 

(FOR ALPHABETICAL INDEX SEE PAO.E 63.) 



Accountants and Auditors. 

Barber, Henry & Co., Toronto. 
Fahey, Win., Toronto. 
Hoskins, David. Toronto. 
Jenkins & Hardy, Toronto. 
Kidd, F. H„ Toronto. 
Merson, Geo. O., Toronto. 
Williamson. T. G., Toronto. 

Anvils. 

Boker, Henry, Montreal. 

Axes Hatchets, Scythes, etc, 

American Axe and Tool Co., Montreal. 
Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont. 

Babbitt Metal. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Fairbanks Co.. Montreal and Toronto. 
Langwell's, Montreal. 
Syracuse Smelting Works, Montreal. 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

Atwater, Duclos ft Chauvin, Montreal. 
Beatty, Blackstock, Fasken ft Riddell, 

Toronto. 
Burritt, James H, K.C., Pembroke, Ont. 
Cameron, D. O., Toronto. 
Hamilton, J. C, Toronto. 
Tupper, Phippen & Tupper, Winnipeg. 
Vidal, I. L. <)., Montmagny and Quebec. 

Belting, Hose, etc. 

Canadian Rubber Co., Montreal and 

Toronto. 
Dominion Belting Co.. Hamilton. 
Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co., 

Toronto. 
Pullman Mfg. Co., Rochester, N.Y. 

Box Straps. 

Dartnell, E. F. Montreal. 
Warminton, J. N., Montreal, Que. 

Brushes and Brooms. 

United Factories, Toronto. 

Buffalo Robes. 

Berlin Robe ft Clothing Co., Berlin, Ont. 

Carpenters' and Builders' Tools 
and Supplies. 

Atkins, E. C, ft Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Baynes, Chas., Blackburn, Eng. 
Bliss, R., Mfg. Co., Pawtucket, R.I. 
Cartland, .las., it Sons, Birmingham.Eng. 
Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 
Howland. H. S. Sons ft Co., Toronto. 
Hyde, F., ft Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Bros, ft Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, ft Son, Toronto. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 
Metallic Rooting Co., Toronto. 
Newman it Sons, Birmingham. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Fa. 
Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Ormsby, A. B., ft Co., Toronto. 
Phillips, Chas. D., Newport, Eng. 
Smith & Hemenway Co., New York. 
Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain. 

Conn. 
Union Mfg. Co., New Britain. Conn. 

Carpet Stretcher. 

Grand River Metal Works, Gait, Ont. 

Carriage and Waggon Ac- 
cessories. 

Dunlop Tire Co., Toronto 
Warnock, James, ft Co., Gait, Ont 

Cash Registers. 

Hallwood Cash Register Co.. Toronto 

Churns. 

Maxwell, David, & Sons, St. Marys. 

Clippers— All Kinds. 

American Shearer Mfg.Co.,Nashua,N.H, 
Cordage. 

Canadian Cordage and Mfg. Co., Peter- 
borough, Ont. 
Consumers' Cordage Co., Montreal. 
Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 

Corundum. 

Canada Corundum Co., Toronto 

Cutlery. 

Bailey Cutlery Co., Brantford, Oni 
Birkett, Thos., ft Son Co., Ottawa 
Boker, Henry, Montreal 

Gem Cutlery Co., New York. 
Htinisch's, R., Sons Co,, Newark, N.J. 
Howland, H. S. Sons ft Co., Toronto 
Hutton, James, ft Co.. Montreal. 
Korn Geo. W., Razor Mfg. Co., Little 
Valley, N.Y. 



Lamplotigh, F. W., & Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, ft Son, Toronto. 
Silberstein, A. L., New York. 
Smith ft Hemenway Co., New York. 
Wiebusch ft Hilger, New York. 

Educational. 

Canadian Corr. College, Toronto. 
St. Margaret's College, Toronto. 
Western Business College, Toronto. 

Elec tro-Pla ting. 

Sutherland, D., Toronto. 

Engravers. 

Legg Bros.. Toronto. 

Files and Rasps. 

Barnett Co., G. ft H, Philadelphia, Pa. 
(.rose, Walter, Montreal. 

Financial Institutions. 

Bank of Toronto, Toronto. 
Bradstreet Co. 

British American Assurance Co. .Toronto. 
Canada Permanent Mtg. Co., Toronto. 
Canadian Bank of Commerce, Toronto. 
Confederation Life Ass,, Toronto. 
Dom. of ■ an. Guarantee Co., Toronto. 
Metropolitan Bank, Toronto. 
Toronto General Trusts, Toronto. 
Western Assurance Co.. Toronto. 

Firearms and Ammunition. 

Hamilton Rifle Co., Plymouth, Mich. 

Hopkins ft Allen Arms Co. , Norwich, Con. 

Iver Johnson's Arms and Cycle Works, 
Fitchburg, Mass. 

Lewis Bros, ft Co., Montreal. 

Remington Arms Co., Ilion, N.Y. 

Union Metallic lartridge Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 



Food Choppers 



Bowman, John, Hardware ft Coal Co., 

London, Ont. 
Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Russell ft Erwin Mfg. Co., New Britain, 

Conn. 
Smith ft Hemenway Co., New York. 

Gas Lamps and Sundries. 

Auer Light Co., Montreal. 

Gold Paint. 

Ridout. Geo., ft Co., Toronto. 

Hardware Specialties. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 
Hockey Sticks, Pucks, etc. 

Howland, H. S., Sons ft Co., Toronto. 
Nerlich ft Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros., ft Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, ft Son, Toronto. 
Salyerds, E. B., Preston, Ont. 

Horse Blankets and Carriage 
Rugs. 

Guelph Waterproof Clothing Co.,Guelph. 
Trees, Samuel, ft Co.. Toronto. 

Horseshoe Pads. 

Canadian Rubber Co., Montreal. 
Dunlop Tire Co., Toronto. 

Ice Cream Freezeis. 

Dana ft Co., Cincinnati, O. 
Ice Cutting Tools. 

Donaldson, Robt., ft Sons, Montreal. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Iron Pipe. 

Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Co., Guelph. 

Iron Pumps. 

McDougall, R., Co., Gait, Ont 

Lanterns. 

Wright, E. T., ft Co., Hamilton. 

La wn Mo wers. 

Maxwell, David, ft Sons, St. Marys Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Ledgers and Office Stationery. 

Briggs Ledger System Co., Toronto. 
II art ft Riddell, Toronto. 
Weese, G. A. ft Son, Toronto. 

Lumbermen's Supplies. 

Birkett. Tims., ft Sim Co., Ottawa. 
Lewis Bros, ft Co., Montreal. 

Machinery. 

Canada Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Crosby. G. A , ft Co., Samia, Ont. 
Dodge Mfg. Co., Toronto 



Empire Machine and Metal Stamping 

Co., Toronto. 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto, 
.lardine, A. B., ft Co., Hespeler, Ont 
Kay Electric Dynamo and Motor Co., 

Toronto. 
Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Morrow MachineScrewCo.,Ingersoll,Ont. 
Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co., 
Toronto. 

Mantels. 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co., Toronto. 

Manufacturers' Agent. 

Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 

Metals. 

American Sheet Steel Co., New York. 

Booth Copper Co., Toronto. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co., Midland, Ont. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Deseronto Iron Co., Deseronto, Ont. 

Frankel Bros., Toronto. 

Ironside, Son & Co., London, Eng. 

Jackson, C. F., ft Co., Vancouver, B.C. 

Leslie, A. C. ft Co., Montreal. 

Lewis Bros, ft Co., Montreal. 

London Rolling Mills Co., London, Ont. 

Lysaght, John, Bristol, Eng. 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co., New 

Glasgow, N.S. 
Peck Rolling Mills, Montreal. 
Samuel, Benjamin ft Co., Toronto. 
Thompson, B. ft S. H. ft Co., Montreal. 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth.etc. 

Falkiner, H. F, Toronto, 
Hutton, Jas., ft Co., Montreal. 
Oakey, John, ft Sous, London, Eng. 

Milk Cans and Trimmings. 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
McClary Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Nickel-Plated Ware. 

Coltart ft Cameron. Winnipeg. 

Paints, Oils and Glass, 

Alabastine Co., Paris, Ont. 

Canada Linseed Oil Mills, Montreal. 

Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 

Dods, P. D., ft Co., Montreal. 

Globe Paint Co., Toronto. 

Grant-Hamilton Oil Co., Toronto. 

Henderson ft Potts, Montreal and 

Halifax. 
Hobbs Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 
Jamieson, R. C, & Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Bros, ft Co., Montreal. 
McArthur, Corneille ft Co., Montreal. 
McCastill, Dougall ft Co., Montreal. 
Nobles ft Hoare, London, Eng. 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Ramsay ft Son, Montreal. 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 
Standard Paint and Varnish Works, 

Windsor, Ont. 
Thome. R. E., Montreal. 
Toronto Plate Glass Imp. Co., Toronto, 

Perforated Sheet Metals. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Plumbers' Supplies. 

Frankel Bros., Toronto. 

Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Portland Cement. 

Grey and Bruce Portland Cement Co.. 
Owen Sound. 

Hanover Portland Cement Co., Han- 
over, Ont. 

Hyde, F . ft Co., Montreal. 

Sun Portland Cement Co., Owen Sound. 

Radiators, Furnaces, Stoves, 
Tinware, etc. 

Adams Co., Dubuque, Iowa. 
Clare Bros, ft Co., Preston, Ont. 
Dominion Radiator Co., Toronto, Ont 
Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Kemp Mnfg. Co., Toronto. 
Sterne, G. F., Brantford, Out. 
Telephone City Stoves, Brantford. 
Western Foundry Co., Wingham. 



Roofing Supplies. 



Jenking, A. C, Montreal. 
Lockerbyft McComb, Montreal. 
Metallic Rooting Co., Toronto. 
Ormsby, A. B., ft Co., Toronto. 
Paterson Mfg. Co., Toronto ft Montreal 

Rubber Stamps. 

Young. C G.. ft Co., Toronto. 

Sales. 
Ford ft Featherstons, Hamilton. 
Taylor, J. ft J., Toronto. 

Scales. 

Fairbanks Co.. Montreal and Toronto. 



Screws, Bolts, Etc. 
Canada Screw Co. Hamilton. 

Sewer Pipes. 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co., Hamilton 
Hyde, F., ft Co., Montreal. 

ShelfBoxes. 

Bennett Mfg. Co., Pickering, Ont. 

Shelf Brackets. 

Atlas Mfg. Co., New Haven, Conn. 
Grand River Metal Works. Gait, Out. 

Silver-Plated Ware. 

Ontario Silver Co., Niagara Falls. 
Toronto Silver Plate Co., Toronto. 
Standard Silver Co., Toronto. 

Skates. 

Boker, Henry, Montreal. 
Howland, H. S., Sons ft Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros, ft Co. . Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, ft Son, Toronto. 
Nott, W. G., ft Co., Toronto. 

Sporting Goods. 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co., Lititz, Pa. 

Springs. 

Wallace, Barnes Co. , Bristol, Conn. 

Steel Castings. 

Montreal Steel Works, Montreal 

Steel Rails. 

Jackson, C. F., ft Co., Vancouver, B.C. 
Sessenwein Bros., Montreal. 

Stencils. Stamps, etc. 

Hamilton Stamp and Stencil Works, 
Hamilton, Ont. 

Tea Strainer. 

Imperial Tea Strainer Co., Montreal. 

Toasters^ 

Fairgrieve Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Harkins ft Willis, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Traps. 

Lewis Bros, ft Co., Montreal. 
Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co., Lititz. Pa. 

Tubes. 

Millen, John, ft Sons, Montreal 

Wall Paper. 

Staunton's Limited, Toronto. 

Warehousing and Warehouse 
Trucks. 

Coltart ft Cameron, Winnipeg. 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Slingsby, H. C, Montreal. 

Washing Machines, etc. 

Connor, J. H, & Son, Ottawa, Can. 
Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Watches. 

Ingersoll, Robt. H., ft Bro., New York 

Waterproof Covers & Clothing. 

Guelph Waterproof Clothing Co., Guelph 

Whips'. 

Lewis Bros, ft Co., Montreal 

Wholesale Hardware. 

Birketf, Thos., & Sons Co., Ottawa 
Bowman, John, Hardware ft Coal Co.. 

London, Out. 
Canada Hardware Co.. Montreal. 
( a\ ■orhill, Learmont ft Co., Montreal. 
Howland. II. S., Sons ft Co., Toronto. 
Kennedy Hardware Co,, Toronto. 
Lewis Bros, ft Co.. Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, ft Son, Toronto. 

Woodenware. 

United Factories, Toronto. 

Wire, Wire Rope, Cow Ties, 
Fencing Tools, etc. 

American Steel and Wire Co., New 

York. Montreal, Chicago. 
Dennis Wire and Iron Co., London, Ont. 
Dominion Wire Mnfg. Co., Montreal and 

Toronto. 
Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Ironside, Son ft Co., Loudon, Eng, 
Meadows, Geo. B., Co., Toronto. 
Oneida Community, Niagara Falls. 
Walter. B. F. ft Co., Montreal. 

Wrapping Papers. 

Canada Paper Co., Toronto. 



64 



[ 



Want Ads. 



In this paper cost 2 cents per word fiirst 
insertion, 1 cent per word subsequent in- 
sertions. Contractions count as one word, 
but five figures (such as $1,000) may pass 
as one word. Cash remittance to cover 
cost must in all cases accompany orders, 
otherwise we cannot insert the advertise- 
ment. When replies come in our care 5 
cents additional must be included for for- 
warding same. Many large business deals 
have been brought about through adver- 
tisements of 20 or 30 words. Clerks can be 
secured, articles sold and exchanged, at 
small expenditure. 

MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO.. Limited 
Montreal and Toronto 



"^ 

J 



SOLID STEEL SCISSORS 



Made in Canada and fully warra 




You will save money and give your customers better 
satisfaction by placing your cutlery orders with 

BAILEY CUTLERY CO., Limited 

!■ nnnriTrnnr Ontario. 

Razors, Shears, Scissors, Tinners' Snips and Butcher Knives. 




LUFKIN 



Omnrnm^ . .._.,... MEASURING TAPES 

Steel, Metallic, Linen, Pocket, Ass Skin, 

Pat. Leather, Bend Leather, Etc. 

ARE THE BE8T AND MOST POPULAR TAPE8 IN THE WORLD. 
YOUR STOCK IS NOT COMPLETE WITHOUT THEM. 

LUFKIN RULE CO., Saginaw, Mich, U.S.A. 

New York City Branch— 280 Broadway. 

For sale by ALL PROMINENT CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 




A Happy New Year 

and a continuance of Prosperity is our wish for all our kind friends and 
patrons. Our success depends upon yours and we are confident of more 
business coming our way than ever before, therefore we have put ourselves 
in better shape than ever to give prompt service at right prices, 
in our line of 

"Huron" Stoves 
ssS Ranges 



We shall have a number of new lines 
for this year, that it will pay you to see 
before ordering elsewhere. 

Cordially yours, 

F. J. Taylor, J. J. Cunningham, 

W. D. Varey, of 




The Western Foundry Co., u-«* Wingham, Ont. 




I: Black Diamond File WorU 

G. & H. Barnett Company 



Ine. 1B96. 



PHILADELPHIA 



!! 
!! 
I 




Awarded 
By JURORS ^ 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 



t 




.'%^^%^V^^%/%^^V^^.'V%^%/%^^%^%'^V%/^%^%^r'%^i 



RUBBER HOSE 



FOR 



Water 
Steam 
Gas 



Air 

Acids 

Brewers 



Suction 

Fire Protection 

Pneumatic Tools 



uperior in quality. 
Satisfactory in service. 



"Redstone" Sheet Packing 

for High Pressures. 

Does not Burn out or Blow out and requires 
no following up. 



The Gutta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 



OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Wanroomt- 
45-47-4B West Front 8t. 



TORONTO, 



Factories— 1 15-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



CANADA. 



TO MANUFACTURERS OF 

Stoves and Ranges. 

Write us with particulars of your requirements, 
and we shall be pleased to make you lowest 
quotations for all qualities of sheets. 

Patent Planished Sheet (Russia) Iron, Dewees Wood. 

Hammered Polished Steel. 

Wellsville Polished. 

American Blue. 

Oak Stove Body Sheets. 

Range Steel (Dead Flat). 

Open Hearth Steel Sheets. 

American Bessemer Steel Sheets. 

Bessemer Blue Annealed. 

B.&S.H. THOMPSON & CO. 

LIMITED 

53 St. Sulpice Street, 
MONTREAL. 

Dominion of Canada Sales Agents for American Sheet Steel 
Company and American Tin Plate Company. 



VARNISHES *n JAPANS 

McCASKILL, D0U6ALL & CO. 

Manufacturers MONTREAL 




Standard Railway and Carriage Varnishes 
Standard Boat and Spar Varnishes 

— Won't turn white from the effects of water and sun 

Standard Piano, Furniture and Decorative Varnisbes 
Zanzerine Transparent Wood Finishes and Varnishes 
Architectural Varnishes 



OFFICES 



161 Summer St., 

BOSTON, Mass., U.S.A. 



30 St.JJohn St., 

MONTREAL 



Classified Index to Advertisements on page 63. 



Neither .Fictitious nor Exorbitant 
Get LANGWELL'S BABBIT, MONTREAL. 



HARDWAMETAL 

A. WeeKly Newspaper devoted to tHe Hardware, Metal, MacHinery, 
Heating and Plumbing Trades in Canada. 



VOL. XVI. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JANUARY 9. 1904. 



NO. 2 




1(\ N TRADE: 

\ CUTLERY 



MARK zip' 



FOR SALE BY LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES. 



(C 



QUEEN M HEAD " IRON 

4HA11J.1 




Sold on merit, 



but price is also right. 



CANADA 



JOHN LTSAOHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE A CO., MONTREAL 
BRISTOL, ENO. Managers Canadian Branch 





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RHUflalr^iT 




" SAFFORD" RADIATORS SAVE 
MONEY AND MAKE SOLID COMFORT. 

No red lead, bolts or packing used in their construction. 
Built in all designs for windows, curves, angles, and to 
go around columns. 

TOR STEAM OR I10T WATER HEATING. 
POSITIVELY NON-LEAkABLE. 

Recommended by all leading architects and contractors 
throughout the civilized world. Suitable for all classes 
of buildings. Illustrated catalogue free for the asking. 



THE DOMINION RADIATOR CO., Limited 

Head Office: TORONTO, CAN ■ 

BRANCHES: Montreal, Quebec, St. John, N.B., Winnipeg and Vancouver, B.C. 



ICE TOOLS 



OF ALL KINDS 







No. I -ICE MARKER WITH SWING GUIDE. 





f ^S t ) 



No. 35- FORK BARS. 



W D 



SAWS 

PLOWS 







E CHISELS 



No. 7-IOE PLOW. 



ETC 



WRITE FOR TRADE PRICES. 



RICE LEWIS & SON 

LIMITED 



COR. KING AND VICTORIA STS., 



TORONTO. 






HARDWARE AND METAL 



James Cartland & Son 



Manufacturers of every description of 



Limited 



CABINET BUILDERS' FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND. 



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London Showrooms : 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 



THE CANADIAN RUBBER CO. 

of Montreal. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



C7 



Rubber Belting, 
Hose, Packing, 
Valves, Gaskets, 



ETC, ETC 



We make a specialty of 

HORSE SHOE PADS 

the best in the market. 



Write for Price* and Circulars. 



Head Office : : MONTREAL 

BRANCHES TORONTO, WINNIPEG and VANOOUVER 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 




Oar "YANKEE" Tool Book 
tells all about them. Ma iled 
free on application 



No. 15. "Yankee" Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 




No. 30. "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




No. 41. "Yankee" Automatic Drill, Right Drill Points In Handle. 




Manufacturers also ot 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BUZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chipper s. 

Fluting Machines, 

Hand Flute ra. 



No. 60. "Yankee" Reciprocating Drill for Iron, Steel, Brass, Wood, etc 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 




NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 



No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 

Screw Driver. 



Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 



LIMITED 



OTTAWA, ONT. 

WHOLESALE HARDWARE. 



We have a large assortment of 



CARVERS 



SETS or 
PAIRS, ^ 



IN SILK LINED AND 
LEATHER BOUND CASES 



Seasonable Goods Always Ready for Prompt 
Shipment. 

Skates, Cross-Cut Saws, 
Horse Blankets. 

Lumbermen's Sullies 




CLEANLINESS . 

There is no drip from the Russwin to soil clothing and 
floors. The gutter carries all juices to the dish — they are not 
deposited upon the floor. The machine itself is quickly cleaned 
with the least possible effort. Write for Booklets, Posters 
and Electrotypes to assist you. 



Russell & Erwin Mfg. Co. 

New Britain, Conn., U.S.A. 



BRASS 



SHEETS, RODS, TUBES. 



M.& L SAMUEL, BENJAMIN & CO. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 

27 Wellington St. West, ^TORONTO, ONT. 

EUROPEAN HOUSE 16 PHILPOT LANE, LONDON, ENGL 



HARDWARE AND MBTAL 



Engine and 

Boiler Room Supplies. 

OUR STOCK IS COMPLETE. WHY NOT LET US MAKE YOURS SO? 



Rubber Belting 



IN ALL QUALITIES 




Leather Belting 



EXTRA " 
1 STANDARD" 
AGRICULTURAL " 






VALVES, 

OIL CUPS. 

STEAM AND 

WATER GAUGES, 

PIPE FITTINGS. 



PIPE THREADING 

MACHINES. 





PISTON AND 

SHEET RUBBER PACKING, 

COTTON WASTE, 
JUTE. ASBESTOS. 

OAKUM. 




SEND US YOUR MAIL ORDERS. WE'LL HANDLE THEM A3 YOU WISH THEM HANDLED 

LEWIS BROS. & CO., 



TORONTO, 

87 VORK ST. 



Address all correspondence to 

OTTAWA, 

54 QUEEN ST. 



MONTREAL. 



VANCOUVER, 

141 WATER ST. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, Limited 




MONTREAL MILL, ESTABLISHED IB25. 



BINDER TWINE. 



650 ft. p&r pound 
600 ft. 



We manufacture the following brands : 

Blue Ribbon 

Red Cap 

Tiger ... SSO ft. 

Golden Crown 500 ft. 

Standard - - SOO ft. 

Sisal ... SOO ft. 

The above Brands have stood the test for years, and are the Farmers' Favorites. 

Out of 14 lots of Binder Twine, seized and confiscated by the Government Binder Twine Inspector this year, only one 
was Canadian. 

Dealers, who handle our Twine, will secure a satisfactory article, and, at the same time, help to build up one of our 
oldest industries. 



See our Samples before placing your order elsewhere. 

Consumers Cordage Company, Limited. 



Head Office, Montreal, Que. 



CARRIAGE AND SADDLERY HARDWARE 



Hard-ware and 

Metal 



IVIsn, Mors© arid Carriage Clothing 




Branch Agency : 

W. LOUIS HALDIMAND, Jr., 

36 St. Dizier street, 
MONTREAL, QUE., 



Branch Agency : 

CHA8. THOMPSON, 

420 Cordova St 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



Fishermen's Clothing, Horse Covers, Dash Aprons, 

Teamsters' Clothing, Wagon Covers, Knee Rugs 

ASK FOR QUOTATIONS. 

The Guelph Waterproof Clothing Co., Guelph, Ontario. 



THE LION BRAND. 




COVERT MFG. CO 

West Troy, N.Y 

Auto Screw Jack 

Harness Snaps Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BV JOBBERS AT MFRS. PRICE 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

* RA' J ' /•*, ^&t- Largest Variety , 
aSJ&*zZr^s/l Toilet, Hand, Electric Powerl 

V ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Sheep-Sheariog Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE TO 
American Shearer Dlfg. Co., Nashua, N.H..LSA 





Oneida Community Goods' 

HALTERS, COW TIES. SNAPS, etc., etc.. 

In all sizes and styles. May be had of all 
Jobbers throughout Canada. 

Factory— NIAGARA FALLS, 0NT 



"Just as good" is not Solarine. 
For 1904— Buy 

SOLARINE 
™ ve v METAL POLISH 

Order through your Jobber, or vrrite 
SOLARINE DEPOT, 60 George St, Tc R0NT0 



We desire to call your attention to some of our specialties which are handled extensively 

by the general hardware trade. 

Horse Blankets (all kinds) Burlington-Stay-on Blankets 

Rubber and Oiled Knee Rugs Plush and Woollen Knee Rugs 

If you handle the above, it will be of interest to you to write us. 
The Trees, Sprtggs Co., Limited, C~rw,.~i T r <* A <> a r»« T«k M ..+« 

Winnipeg, Man. bamuel Trees & L»o., Toronto 

Importers and Manufacturers of Saddlery Goods. 



That Side Wire Tired Feeling. 

All through the trade is getting that feeling of confidence in the 
Dunlop Side Wire Tire. The points of it afe so simple that its merits are plain 

at a glance. The retaining wires do not pass 
through the centre of the rubber tire but to 
either side of it, on the outside, close to the rim 
of the wheel, and these retaining wires do not 
press against the rubber, but against across bars 
vulcanized into it at regular intervals. The 
wearing, eating-into force of the wire is there 
fore counteracted. The tire may be fastened 
to the wheel with as tight a pressure as the rim 
will carry without the wire cutting into the rub- 
ber, and tji^^jP/is/s^ tight that sand and gravel cahnot work between the tire 
and the rimortne Wheel. 

WE ARE THE SOLE HANLFACTURERS IN CANADA. 



THE DUNLOP TIRE CO., Limited, 
TORONTO, CANADA 

Agencies: Montreal, St. John, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 






The Sales You Lose... 

represent just so much money lost. In the matter of robes, for example, von 
can do a clean cut, profitable business if you sell the right sort of robes. 

"Arctic" Buffalo Robes 

are sensible, durable, attractive, profitable. They are easily sold, for the\ 
sell themselves, with a very little talk on your part. Order a sample. 

Made of rich, dark brown fur, lined with red or dark green Astrachan cloth, interlined with rubber ; 
nicely trimmed ; rain, wind and moth proof ; 52 x 54 ; 62 x 54 ; 72 x 54. 

rlin Robe & Clothing Co., 

LIMITED 

Berlin, Ontario. 



J 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

DO IT NOW 



Buy 



True 
Brand 




Fencing 
Plyers 



BEST GOODS 



RIGHT PRICES 



E. F. WALTER & CO., "Kir*, Montreal 



H. S 



. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Limited 

37-39 West Front Street, TORONTO. 

''Semper Idem" Razor. 




"ALWAYS THE SAME" 

This Razor is made by Henry Boker, is the same quality as the "King Cutter," but with OUT brand, "Semper Idem" 
stamped on the blade. If you desire a first-class Razor, try the "Semper Idem." 

YOU WILL LIKE IT. 

DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 

ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA. 

"Maxwell Favorite Churn" Lawn Mowers. iBEHS 

PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, clble Steel Knives and Cutting Plate. 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever 

Drive, and Detachable Driving Link. Improved If your Wholesale House does not offer you these 

for season of 1904. Steel or Wood Frame as articles 

SEND DIRECT TO US. 

"THE MAXWELL" 

Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inohei' 




desired. 



Wheelbarrows. &• »*><* »■*««* ««■• 



Steel Frame Churn 



MAXWELL MOWER 

8-inch Low Wheel. 




6 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



IRON 



Bars in Flats, Rounds, Squares, 
Ovals, Half Ovals, Half* Rounds and 
Bands. Also Wrought Washers. 

QOOD QUALITY. PROHPT SHIPMENT. 



London Rolling Mill Co. 

Limited. 
LONDON, CANADA. 



STEEL 



PAGE-HERSEY IRON & TUBE CO., 



GUELPH, CANADA, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 



Limited 



BLACK AND GALVANIZED 

WROUGHT MERCHANT PIPE 

OF SUPERIOR QUALITY AND FINISH. 



The New Century Bail-Bearing 
Washing Machine. 

FAvoft' Tt6 




Not the cheapest but decidedly the best Washing 
Machine made. 

Five to seven minutes only required for a tubful. 

The operator need not stand when using it, and there is practically 

no wear on garments. 

Full information given on application. 

THE DOWSWELL MANUFACTURING CO., 



Hamilton, Ont. 

W. L. HALDIMAND & SON, Montreal, 



Limited. 
Eastern Acrents. 



HARDWARE NOVELTY. 




THE 




American Watches. 



■SSSk $1-25 to $2.50 



ARGUMENT. 



We now offer a practical time piece for the Hardware Trade of Canada, 
and base our statement upon the following : 

First— It is absolutely guaranteed to keep accurate time. 

Second— It stands rough usage and does not get out of order easily, 
making it the only watch for dealers outside of the jewelery trade to 
handle, and also making it a practical one for sportsmen, boys and all 
men who give a watch hard usage. 

Third-Its low price and high quality insure a tremendous sale, which 
we further augment by furnishing many handsome advertising devices 
for your store. 

Fourth— Last but not least, these watches offer a handsome profit. 
Price cutters are not supplied. 

Sold by several leading Hardware Jobbers of Canada. We will tell 
you who they are upon request. 

Trial Offer -To any Hardware Dealer who will write to us upon his 
business letter head and inclose 75c. we will send a sample watch (duty 
not paid) and our catalogue, so that he can test its accuracy and durability. 



INFORMATION ON REQUEST. 

ROBT. H. INGERSOLL & BRO. 



S«-S3 rialden Lane, 



NEW YORK, U.5.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




1 



We desire to extend to our 
many friends our sincere 
thanks for their kind patron- 
age during the past year. 



It is our earnest wish that 
the New Year may be a 
Prosperous and Happy one 
for all. 



Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co, 



LIMITED. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. 

rate 



PERFORATED SHEET METALS 



\r\ 



111 



littiVVii 



( O-IMITED) 

i WIRE MANUFACTURERS 

(\|t METAL PERFORATORS 






etc. 

All sizes of Perforations an 
thickness ot metal s for 

MINERS' USE, 
GRAIN CLEANING 

MACHINERY. 
BEE KEEPERS. 
MALT KILN FLOORS. 
ETC. 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., LIMITED, "-.S,'ggS.?&, 

American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York 

Empire Building 



Montreal 

N. Y. Life Building 



Chicago 

The Rookery 



BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED PLAIN WIRE 

PLAIN TWIST CABLE FENCING 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire; Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of 
every description; Rail Bonds, Bale Ties, Special Wires for all 
purposes, Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold-drawn Steel 
Shafting. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



SSS1S the GEO.B. MEADOWS 

Toronto Wire, Iron an Brass Works Company, Limited, 
Manufacturers of Wire Window Guards, Wire Cloth, 
Moulders' Riddles, Children's Cots, Bank and Office 
Railings, Ornamental Iron Fencing, Window Fix- 
tures, Wire Work, Architectural Wrought Iron 
Work. 1 1 7 KlQg st West) TORONTO, ONT. 




Coal Screens 
Sand Screens 
Ash Screens 



Dennis Wire & 
Iron Co., 

LONDON, Ont. 



New Catalogue ready Feb. 
1904. Send in your name. 



Ice 
Tools 



of all sorts. A 
good line for the 
hardware dealer. 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICE LIST 

ROBT. DONALDSON & SONS. 

30 Youville Square, - - MONTREAL. 




TRADE WITH ENGLAND 

Every Canadian who wishes to trade 
successfully with the Old Country 
should read 

"Commercial Intelligence" 

(The address is 168 Fleet St., 
London, England.) 

The cost is only 6c. per week. (Annual 
subscription, including postage, $4.80.) 

Moreover, regular subscribers are allowed 
to advertise without charge in the paper. 
See the rules. 



Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clotbes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by all Wholesale Dealers. 




IM 



for IRON 



Our Specialties are British and Foreign Iron and Steel, Metals, Bars, Plates, Sheets, Bolts 
and Nuts, Tin Plates, etc. 

We are sole Licencees for Page's Patent Wire Stretcher and also for Ironside's Patent 
Wire Cutters. 

We Publish Monthly a "CANADIAN METAL PRICE LIST," giving quotations in Dollars and Cents, 

(C.I.F,). also "WEEKLY MARKET REPORT." 

Let us have your name and address for ' PRICE LIST" and "MARKET REPORT." 



IRONSIDE, SON * CO., l6 ^re a ar T o a w n e e rSt.,E.C., 



London, England. 



G. A. Crosby & Co. of Ontario, 




SARNIA, ONT. 



LIMITED 



Manufacturers of" 



Patent Automatic Can Making Machinery, Presses, 
Dies and Special Machinery for Working Sheet Metal 

H. W. Petrle, 141-145 Front Street West, TORONTO-Selllng Agent. 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON -EJECTING 



12, 16 and 20 Guage. 

Steel and Twist Barrels 
Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
Take Down ' 
Cun Made 




HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 

Also makers of H. & R. Revolvers. 
Catalog on request. Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BURMAN'S 



CELEBRATED 



-^T? 



CLIPPERS 



-Contractors to the War and India Ofifices- 



PATENTEES AND MANUFACTURERS OF- 



Horse Clippers, Barbers' Clippers, Dog Clippers, Leg Clippers, 

Fetlock Clippers, Body Clippers, Mane Clippers 

and Clippers of all descriptions. 



310 




The Improved 

B. PATTERN 

"NEWMARKET" 

Detachable Plates. 

Improved Cap with Long 
Bearing. 

Rigidity and Easy Running. 

Accurately Machined and 
Perfectly Fitted. 

ALL PARTS INTERCHANGEABLE.' 




The "Handicap" Clipper. 

The cheapest centre-adjustment clipper made. 



Bown's "Newmarket" Clipper. 

Our goods are stocked by all the leading Jobbers throughout the Dominion. 



For Beauty of 

Design 

and 

Superiority 

of 
Workmanship 




The "NEWMARKET" 
POWER CLIPPER 

stands 

Supreme 

and 

Unassailable. 



The "Newmarket" Power Clipper. 

Strong and Reliable. Speedy and Durable. Simple and Effective. 

BURMAN & SONS, Limited, %%? BIRMINGHAM 



10 



ENGLAND 



Hardware and metal 



Canadian Cordage 

& MFG. Co., Limited. 

BINDER TWINE. 



,-- ■--.- --" ■ 





/gf^jteg 



§?^ 




"ROYAL" MANILA, 650 ft. to the pound. 
"ROYAL" MANILA, 600 ft. to the pound. 
"ROYAL" MANILA, 550 ft. to the pound. 
"ROYAL" MANILA, 500 ft. to the pound. 
STANDARD, - 500 ft. to the pound. 
SISAL, - - 500 ft. to the pound. 

Our " ROYAL " Brand of Binder Twine is manufactured of the finest raw material that 
can be obtained, and with the utmost care. For length and strength we have no competitors. 
Our Twine is manufactured with the latest machinery, and dealers desiring to have exclusive 
agencies should apply at once Will name lowest prices, or will enter contracts without price 
named until The International Harvester Co. announces prices. 



Wire, Write or 'Phone. 

CANADIAN CORDAGE & HFG. CO., Limited 

Peterborough, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



EASY 


RUNNING 


A 


CHILD 




CAN 




USE 




IT. 



NOT HIGH PRICED 



A MAN 

CAN 

AFFORD 

IT. 



The Woody a tt 

Lawn Mower 




PATENTED IN CANADA, GREAT BRITAIN 
AND UNITED STATES. 



Manufactured by- 



Taylor - Forbes Co., 



Guelph, Ont. 



Limited. 



At the Largest and Best Equipped Hardware 
Factory in Canada. 



SIMPLE IN 

CONSTRUCTION 



A MECHANIC 

CAN 

APPRECIATE 

IT. 



QUALITY THE BEST 



A DEALER 

CAN 

GUARANTEE 

IT. 



THE BEST RESULTS ALWAYS FOLLOW THE SALE AND USE OF 



KEMP'S 



BROAD HOOP ROLL RIM 
BOTTOM MILK CAN TRIMMINGS 





A criticising public have used them for the past five years and the increasing 
demand is proof of their superiority, also evidence of the satisfaction 
which they give. 

The Roll Rim Bottom having no sharp turns does not break the grain of the 
metal or lessen its wearing qualities. 

Narrow Top Hoops can be supplied in place of Broad Top Hoops if desired. 

For Strength, Durability and Finish our Trimmings are unexcelled. 

They cost no more than inferior qualities. 

We also carry in stock a full line of First Quality Tinned Iron, cut suit- 
able for the different size of Trimmings, which we. will supplj at the 
lowest current market quotations. 




KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO, CANADA. 



12 



Classified List of Advertisements on Page 63. 



Hardware •nd 
Metal 



<ft^*,*^* AM » » r|^l»^^ »^ti»< ^ W <t#%*M^»»^»* »t »V 



W^ i*hJ*t^<i%*N%>j 



TRAVELLERS' ANNUAL DINNER. 

Twenty=Ninth Function of The Dominion Association. 



THE twenty-ninth annual ban- 
quet of the Dominion Com- 
mercial Travellers' Associa- 
tion was held at St. Lawrence 
Hall, Montreal, on Wednes- 
day evening, December 30th. To state 
that the attendance was large, that the 
toasts were loyal and enthusiastically 
responded to, that the speeches were of 
a characteristically high order, and that 
everybody enjoyed themselves as only 
commercial travellers can, goes without 
saying. 

The large dining hall was profusely 
and handsomely decorated with flags, 
bunting, streamers and the tables orna- 
mented with ferns and flowers. Shields 
bearing the arms of the different pro- 
vinces of the Dominion hung on the 
walls. On a raised platform at one end 
of the diningroom an orchestra was sta- 
tioned and to the strains of sweet music 
the excelent menu provided by Boniface 
Brown was done ample justice to. 

Mr. J. S. N. Dougall, president of the 
association, Avas in the chair with Hon. 
Sidney Fisher, Minister of Agriculture, 
on his immediate right and Hon. Ray- 
mond Prefontaine, Minister of Marine 
and Fisheries, on his left. Among the 
other distinguished guests occupying 
seats at the president's table were Mr. 
R. L. Borden, M.P., leader of the Oppo- 
sition in the Dominion House, Hon. J. 
I. Tarte, Mr. F. D. Monk, K.C., M.P., 
Mr. Robert Bickendike, M.P., Aid. Nel- 
son, Mr. Arthur J. Hodgson, president of 
the Board of Trade, and Mr. D. M. Stew- 
art, general manager of the Sovereign 
Bank of Canada. 

After the good things provided for 
the inner man had received appreciative 
attention at the hands of the guests, 
President Dougall arose amidst loud ap- 
plause. Before proceeding with the toast 
list he asked the indulgence of the guests 
to give a few statistics regarding the 
association. Organized in 1875 its mem- 
bership had increased from 251 at the 
end of the year of organization to its 
present magnificent roll of 4,434. Since 
1881, when the mortuary benefit scheme 
was established, $36(5,000 had been paid 
to deceased members' families. A sur- 
plus at the end of the first year of $534 



had grown to a surplus at the end of the 
present year of $19,942, making the 
present capital $226,172. The commer- 
cial travellers had every reason to be 
proud of the position of their associa- 
tion. He then proposed the toast of 
" Our King." This having been duly 
honored, the toast of " The President 
of the United States " was also drunk. 
This was done no doubt' in deference to 
the presence at the banquet of the presi- 
dent of the Commercial Travellers' 
Union of the United States, as well as 
in honor of a large number of American- 
born members of the association. Mr. 
George Wilkins then read letters of re- 
gret at inability to attend from Lord 
Minto, Governor-General; Sir Wilfrid 
Laurier, Hon. Chas. Fitzpatrick, Sir 
Wm. Mulock, Hon. R W. Scott, Hon. 
Clifford Sifton, Hon. W. S. Fielding, 
Hon. A. Turgeon, Lord Dundonald and 
Hon. A. W. Edwards, Consul-General of 
the United States. 

The toast of " The Dominion Govern- 
ment " was proposed by Mr. D. M. Le- 
febvre, vice-president of the association, 
and responded to by Hon. Sidney Fisher, 
and Hon. Raymond Prefontaine, the 
former in English and the latter in 
French. Both speakers acknowledged 
the services rendered to Canada by such 
a body of live business men as the Com- 
mercial Travellers' Associations, and 
the widespread influence of travelling 
men on the trade of the country. It was 
the duty of all travellers to" use their 
influence to further the best interests 
of the country and, as Mr. Fisher ex- 
pressed it, " the electors frequently 
looked to the commercial traveller for 
information, hints and inspiration." A 
few remarks were made by the Honor- 
able Minister of Agriculture on the 
material progress that had been made 
in the country's trade. 

Hon. Mr. Prefontaine described com- 
mercial travellers as the advance guard 
of civilization, and declared that the 
Government was proud of them. Mr. 
Prefontaine referred to the opening up 
of new railway and shipping routes, and 
said it would not be long before the 
ubiquitous drummer would be finding 
new avenues to explore and develop. 

13 



Mr. Fred L. Cains, treasurer of the 
association, in a few words proposed 
the toast of "The Dominion Parliament" 
coupling with it the names of Mr. R. L 
Borden, Hon. J. I. Tarte and Mr. F. D. 
Monk. The applause which greeted 
these speakers, particularly the respected 
leader of the Conservative party, must 
have been most flattering to these gentle- 
men. Mr. Borden claimed the privilege 
of being considered a commercial ti-avel- 
ler as he had during the present year 
been on the road offering a good article 
to the public, he claimed he had a "good 
policy," and was endeavoring to lay its 
merits before the people. Speaking of 
the Dominion Parliament he considered 
tli at institution as one of great credit to 
the country. References had been made 
by previous speakers to the Dominion 
but he did not think that any of them 
had greater confidence in the future of 
Canada than he had. Every commercial 
traveller should realize to the fullest 
extent the greatness of this country and 
he thought the proper way for them to 
grasp its great magnificence was for 
them to take the trip from ocean to 
ocean. He asked them all to remem- 
ber their duties to their country. They 
were the pioneers, living factors in the 
progress and development of the land; 
their fingers were ever on the pulse of 
trade and must be acknowledged the 
best judges of material changes. 

Hon. J. I. Tarte, who spoke in Eng- 
lish, in replying, referred to the great 
number of Canadians that had left their 
native land for the United States. He 
would encourage every one to remain 
here and assist in developing our nation- 
al resources, and urged them all to as- 
sist in building up Canada. He also in 
a modest way referred to the part he 
had taken in developing the waterways 
of Canada and his efforts to make the 
Canadian route the best. Canada now 
had the shortest route between the 
great West and Europe, and the im- 
provement of the Canadian route had 
been taken advantage of not only by 
Canadians, but also Western United 
States shippers. Mr. Tarte, on repeat- 
ed cries of "en Francais, en Francais" 
from the guests, repeated the gist of his 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



remarks in the language of his eonr- 
patriots. That this was appreciated was 
evidenced by the applause that greeted 
him on rising. 

Mr. F. D. Monk also replied to this 
loast, speaking first in French and con- 
cluding in English. He fully endorsed 
the sentiments expressed by Hon. Mr. 
Fisher and Hon. Mr. Prefontaine, as to 
our living in a great country, that the 
progress of Our young nation was great 
and that we were on the road to success. 
Are we going to sit by in the midst of 
this great era and see our friends to the 
south of us surpass us? This question 
was answered with vociferous " Never, 
never.'' He called on commercial men to 
use their abilities and great opportuni- 
ties to advance still farther the coun- 
try's trade. 



ion Commercial Travellers' Association 
during the 29 years of its existence, and 
said that it stood to-day on an equal 
basis with any life insurance company 
in the Dominion. 

Aid. Nelson, in the absence of his 
Worship Mayor Cochrane (who was 
confined to his home through illness) re- 
plied to the toast of ' ' The City of Mont- 
real." Mr. Arthur J. Hodgson, respond- 
ed to the toast of " The Board of 
Trade. " 

A vote of thanks proposed to the 
president, Mr. Dougall, for the very ex- 
cellent manner in which he had presided, 
was drunk with enthusiasm, and after 
he had responded, the National Anthem 
was sung. 

The highest praise is due the presi- 
dent and directors and officers of the 




Montreal from Notre Dame. 



The toast of " The Provincial Legis- 
lature " was proposed by Mr. W. J. 
Kagan, a director of the association, 
and replied to by Hon. J. D. Holland. 
an ex-presidenl of the Dominion Com- 
mercial Travellers' Association. Mr. 
Holland pointed out what the Legisla- 
ture had done towards doing away with 
the tax at one time levied by munici- 
palities u|ii>n commercial travellers, ami 
this was a proof of the Legislature's in- 
terest in. and appreciation of the services 
of travelling men. The question ef im- 
proved hotel accommodation was a mat- 
ter sniuew hat difficult to regulate, but 
no efforts would be spared to make the 
traveller more comfortable. This senti- 
ment was loudly applauded by everj 
traveller. Hon. Mr. Rolland also refer- 
red to the progress made by the Domin- 



associatiqn for the magnificent manner 
in which the banquet was arranged and 
conducted, everything went off smoothly 
and well. 

ATTRACTIONS OF A HARDWARE 
WINDOW. 

THE window of McLean's hardware 
store. 389 Talbot street, formerly 
the London Hardware Company; 
proved to have a too irresistible attrac- 
tion for a turkey of a peculiarly large 
and ''tough" disposition yesterday af- 
ternoon. The big bird, brought to mar- 
ket by an Indian. Hew up to a near-by 
building, and could not be coaxed down. 
until shortly after noon, when it be- 
came curious to see something of the 
world. Selecting an attractive window. 
that of the McLean store, it made a 
H 



dash straight for it. The 16-pound bird 
struck the thick plate glass with terri- 
fice force, shivering the glass into a 
hundred fragments. Despite its adven- 
turous passage, the bird was apparent- 
ly uninjured, for it proceeded full speed 
into the body of the store, creating a 
scene of wild excitement amongst the 
clerks and the large crowd of custom- 
ers. The intruder was finally captured 
and turned over to its dusky owner. The 
broken sheet of glass over seven feet 
square, was a- total loss, the insurance 
company having to pay Mr. McLean $34 
just because this turkey was unable to 
resist the too tempting allurements of 
the bright hardware, which shows that 
even the turkeys know where to go for 
a good thine-. — London Free Press. 



OPENED OFFICE IN MONTREAL. 

1^ AYLOR-FORBES CO., hardware 
manufacturers, Guelph, Out., 
have leased a portion of the Lam- 
plough warehouse, 9 De Bresoles street, 
Montreal, where they will immediately 
open up an office and showrooms, as 
well as a large warehouse, where a well- 
assorted stock of various lines will be 
kept on hand. This move on the part 
of this firm should meet with the ap- 
proval of the hardware trade generally, 
especially the jobbers, for whose trade 
they exclusively solicit. The business 
will be in charge of Harry F. Moulden, 
general sales agent, who has been with 
the firm for a great many years, and 
is thoroughly competent to give the 
necessary attention to the business 
which it requires. 

Taylor-Forbes Company have increas- 
ed their business, under the present 
management over 150 per cent, during 
the past 12 months. They have also re- 
cently opened agencies in Halifax, St. 
John, and Vancouver. They are now 
completing an entire new plant for 
bronze goods, and this department will 
be in charge of one of the most exper- 
ienced men in the country. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



prompt Shipoic.ii 



The ONTARIO TACK CO 

Limited 
HAMILTON ONT, 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

Hardware and Metal would be pleased to review 
catalogues, booklets or other such publications issued 
by manufcturers or wholesale dealers selling to the 
hardware, plumbing, machinery or metal trades. Re- 
tailers desiring such publications may also have inserted 
a note to that effect. No charge will be made for these 
services. 

CHRISTMAS GREETINGS. 

One of the daintiest greetings of the 
season was issued by the I). Moore Co., 
Limited, Hamilton. The feature of the 
card is an attractive bunch of holly 
tied with a bow of bright red ribbon. 
On the back the firm extend their com- 
pliments to their friends and customers 
and incidentally refer to their hopes of 
increased business during the new year. 

THE READING HARDWARE CO. 

Tlie Reading Hardware Co., Reading, 
Pa., have demonstrated their progres- 
siveness and good taste by issuing a 
beautiful souvenir book of the ninth 
annual convention of the National 
Hardware Association of the United 
States, held in Atlantic City in Novem- 
ber. The book is full of excellent illus- 
trations showing the many attractions 
and delights of the far-famed seaside 
resort. The booklet is one that will be 
preserved by all recipients, who will not 
fail to appreciate the courtesy of the 
company in sending it out. The Read- 
ing Hardware Co. are also sending out a 
catalogue of their " Vassar " front 
door lock sets, their bit-key front door 
locks and their door checks and hold- 
ers. As the goods in this catalogue are 
among the most modern and fashionable 
offered to the trade the booklet is likely 
to be in great request, so if readers of 
" Hardware and Metal " desire one it 
would be wise to write early for it. 

A RED LETTER YEAR. 

Anyone who gets a copy of the New 
Year's greetings sent dut by Henderson 
& Potts, Limited, Montreal, cannot fail 
to be interested. The message it bears 
is " With compliments and best wishes 
for a red letter year." This is follow- 
ed by an original drawing of four men 
- or monkeys— each of whom is attach- 
ing the red letter to his neighbor's back. 
The card is indeed unique. Get one. 

THE WATSON FOSTER CO. 

The Watson Foster Company, wall 
paper manufacturers, Montreal, have 
sent out a beautiful New Year's card 
with greetings and best wishes. The 
card is a four-fold white sheet of tine 
quality, with an embossed stamp and a 
sprig of holly on the front, and inside, 
the compliments of i he season. The. en- 
tire design is very neat and tasty, and 
does not savor of advertisement. 



^# 



Sell Berger's 

If you want the Paris Green 
trade of your territory — sell 
Berger's — it's best for dealer and user. 

From the dealer's standpoint — it means 
satisfaction in sales, in profit, in satisfied 
customers. 

From the user's stand point it means 
crop safety — it's sure death to bugs — it kills 
every time — never fails. 

It is strongest in poisoning qualities, 
therefore most economical. 

Berger's is the Standard Paris Green of 
Canada. Write for prices today. 

£§7>/£ Sherwin-Williams Co. 

^ PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS 

Cleveland, Chicago, New York, Newark, Boston, Kansas City, 

San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego, Minneapolis, Montreal, 

Toronto, Winnipeg, London, Bng. 

CANADIAN HEADQUARTERS AND FACTORIES 

21 St. Antoine St., Montreal, Que. 



C«aA> 



A HABITANT'S REQUEST. 

OF the many appreciative remarks 
made about the calendar issued 
by the Canada Paint Co. the fol- 
lowing is possibly the most interesting: 
Messrs. La Canada Paint Compagnie, 
Limited, Montreal. 

Voulez vous send to me par le poste, 
not hexpress, wan of doze almanaeh 
with chat noir (black cat). 

I seed wan in ze magasin generate. 
(general store) and offer 2 dozaine eeks 
(eggs?) pour le same but ze mans say, 
" calendaire not for traid." 

Le Bon Cure, Pere Ambrose, parlez 
bo me, " what for you not rite to la 
gentiemans 5n la belle Montreal?" 

I mak' my excuses to yon. 

In Printempts (Spring time) mebbe 
you come Metis to feesh? I drive leetle 
horse " Phil Sheridan." She go on le 
Mice in 2.40 to Brockville buggy-top 
wid two rubbaire tie on ze front wheel 



behind and rouge gear! We go Lac. 
Cravelle, ze trout fat. Meme (same) 
a la Pete Demers grande prix cochen 
(prize pig). Gring la Mouche speckel' 
(speckled fly) for bate and Madam she 
fill big tin pale wid pee soupe pour la 
diner and pied de cochen marines 
(pickled pigs feet!) Bon, Bon. Plenty 
tobac Canadian aromatique. Bring pip 
(pipe) and petit boutelle de Walker! 
Madam and Marie Louisa, Josephine. 
Napoleon, Alphonse, Octave and all de 
oder feefteen enfants send respecks to 
you. Responde sil vous plais (Reply 
if you please), votre devotement, Fran- 
cois Xavier Ghampignen, cultivateur de 
Lagnmes (market gardener). 

PiSj— Mebbe you know my cousin? 
Hees big man ! Work in Mills Rolling 
in zee tak factory since long time.— 

K.X.C. 

Petit Cote. St. Flavie. County de 
Rimouski, Quebec. 



15 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




ONTARIO. 

J. Moag, general merchant, Smith's 
Falls, is dead. 

Z. Regimbal, general merchant, Azilda, 
'has obtained an extension of time. 

J. C. Anderson, coal and wood dealer. 
Windsor, has assigned to W. Home. 

The premises of A. Ross, harness 
maker, Lncknow, have been burned. 

E. Bergerow, general merchant, Clar- 
ence Township, has assigned to Wm. A. 
Cole. 

The planing mill of G. T. Browning, 
builder, Aurora, has been destroyed by 
fire. 

Bramm Bros., bricklayers and millers, 
Berlin, have advertised their brick plant 
for sale. 

Moses & Co., hardware merchants, 
Toronto, have sold out to J. C. McFad- 
den, Toronto. 

J. Stirrell, general merchant, Cani- 
lachie, has been succeeded in business 
by W. Trusier. 

The premises of T. Mcllwraith, coal 
dealer, Hamilton, have been damaged 
by fire. Loss covered by insurance. 

A chattel mortgage against the Stouff- 
ville Brass and Steel Co., Stouffville, 
has been foreclosed. Their assets were 
advertised to be sold January 6. 

QUEBEC. 

J. M. Tardival, painter, Quebec, has 
registered. 

The Tiger Metal Co., Montreal, have 
registered. 

J. Lavoie, general merchant, East 
Broughton, is dead. 

A curator has been appointed to W. 
Tolbat, trader, Isle Berte. 

The Acme Lithographing Co., Mont- 
real, have dissolved partnership. 

Curators have been appointed to J. 
Dufee & Co., general merchants, Martin- 
ville. 

J. Roy, tinsmith, St. Gruillaume 
D 'Upton, has assigned to L'amarche & 
Benoit. 

A. Lesser, general merchant, Webb- 
wood, has assigned to Kent & Tuhcott, 
Montreal. 




AUTOMATIC 




The Revolver 

that made the 
name of Iver 
Johnston 

famous. 



Absolutely Safe. Accidental Discharge Impossible 




Safe because Iver Johnston genius 
devised a mechanism that is unfail- 
ing and perfect — a feature not pos- 
sessed by any other revolver made. 

OTTTWRB OT . ft TTVT\ pTTT TH701 RTTOW TTTTP. ROOiq 



Send for both firearms and cycle 



Automatic 



catalogues. Hammer. 

IVER JOHNSONS ARMS & CYCLE WORKS 



New Vork Office, 99 Chambers Street. 



FITCHBURG, MASS. 



The assets of L. A. Levesque & Co., 
hardware merchants, Ville Marie, have 
been sold. 

The asset's of J. C. Lemire & Co., gen- 
eral merchants, St. Giullaume D 'Upton, 
have been sold. 

NEW BRUNSWICK. 

H. Heustis, of Heustis & Hagerman, 
farm machinery and carriage dealers, 
Eredericton, is dead. 

The business of Price & Shaw, car- 
riage makers, St. John, has been taken 
over by H. Hilyard, who is advertising 
it for sale. 

NOVA SCOTIA. 

L. P. Churchill & Co., wholesale and 
retail general merchants, Lockport, have 
made an assignment. 

Consent has been registered for E. 
Pickles, general merchant, Nictaux 
Ealls, to do business in her own name. 

MANITOBA AND N.W.T. 

(1. H. Brown, general merchant, Con- 
die, lias been succeeded by E. J. Lipton. 



The premises of I. Kent, harness 
maker, Olds, have been damaged by fire. 

J. J. Story, general merchant, Wa- 
wanesa, has advertised his business for 
sale. 

J. J. Taylor, general merchant, Yellow 
Grass, has been succeeded by F. R. 

Elliott. 

Peterson & Anderson, hardware mer- 
chants) Netaskiwin, have dissolved part- 
nership. 

P. M. McDonald, hardware merchant, 
Okotoks, has assigned to H. W. Nevin 
and N. McKelvie. 

Collin & Co., general merchants, St. 
Boniface, have been succeeded by the 
Collin Co., Limited. 

The Nickelson-Steinberg Co., general 
merchants, Napinka, have advertised 
their business for sale. 

The Moose Jaw Machine Works. 
Moose Jaw. have been burned. Loss 
partially covered by insurance. 

Marshall & Hunter, grocers, hard- 
ware and shoe merchants, Medicine Hat, 
have been succeeded by the W. B. Mar- 
shall Co. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



wh Snu? ale 37-39 West Front Street, Toronto. 



LIMITED 

ONLY 

WHOLESALE 



THE "UNIVERSAL 1 ' MEAT CHOPPERS. 










?>#v 



Food Choppers. 

Will also chop meat to perfection. 
No. 8ize Chops Weight 

1 Small, Family 2 lbs. per min. 4 lbs. 

2 Medium 2y 2 " " 5 " 

3 Large 3V6 " " 8 " 




Size 
Farmers' 



Chops 
4 lbs. per min. 



Weight 
8 lbs. 1 oz. 



Each machine fitted with one extra three-tooth Cutter for coarse chopping. 




*^S^> 



No. 231 



Size 
Farmers' 



Chops 
4 lbs. per min. 



u, 



Weight. 
8"/ 2 lbs. 







^> 



Each machine provided with one extra three-tooth Cutter for chopping 
coarse and for use with Stuffing Attachment. 



Size Chops Weight 

204 Butcher 6 lbs. per min. 14V4 lbs. 

Provided with one extra three-tooth Cutter for chopping coarse, or 
for use with Stuffing Attachment. 



FOR OTHER MAKES SEE OUR HARDWARE CATALOGUE. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. umm* Toronto. 

WE shippromptly GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST. U R prices are right 



GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST. 
Faotory ; Dufforln Stroot, Toronto 

17 



Hardware and 
Metal 



Machinery 




Kay Electric Dynamo and Motor Co. f Limited 

Manufacturers of Dynamos and Motors for all pur- 
poses, both direct and alternating currents. Special 
attention given to repairs. 

itftice and Works, 219-221 Queen St. East, Toronto. 

'Phone Main 1251. Estimates cheerfully given. 



"THE PEERLESS" 



is the best Bolster Spring ever produced. A nn e 
line for the hardware trade. Write Us for Prices 




JAMES WARNOCK & CO., 



GALT, ONT. 




WOOD SCREWS, "*CHIM£ SCREWS. 

WIRE NAILS, BRIGHT WIRE GOODS, WIRE IN COILS AND STRAIGHT LENGTHS. 
TORONTO HAMILTON MONTREAL 



(FAIRBANKS 



Renewable 
Asbestos Disc 



VALVES 




l 



THE BEST VALVES THAT MONEY AND SKILL CAN PRODUCE 



You are Cheating Yourself 

if you have not inquired into the merits 
of Fairbanks Valves, because if you want the Best, and 
think you have the best when you are using some other 
make of valves than "Fairbanks" you are laboring 
under a false impression. 

When you buy Fairbanks Valves 
you Know you Have the BEST. 



Their many points of superiority have been fully 
demonstrated by the severe lest of actual service, and for this reason Fairbanks 
Valves are specified by the leading architects and engineers everywhere. 

SEND FOR VALVE CATALOGUE. 




M 



FAIRBANKS OO 



MONTREAL. 



TORONTO. 



WINNIPEG. 



MPANY 

VANCOUVER. 



18 



Hard-war* >nd 
M.t«l 




The Machinery Market. 

TORONTO. 

THE machinery market is report- 
ed to be quiet this week, there 
having been a slight falling 
off ever since last week. This 
quietness has reference to 
the amount of actual business trans- 
acted, not to prospective business. Of 
course this state of affairs is quite na- 
tural, and has been expected for some 
time, since not many enquiries were re- 
ceived during the last few weeks, which 
would lead to immediate business, and 
the business of those two weeks consist- 
ed chiefly in the tilling of booked orders. 
This week's business has been the re- 
verse of that, not very much actual 
business has been transacted but en- 
quiries have been very numerous. In 
deed the past week has been rather re- 
markable for enquiries. They have not 
been confined to any special lines of 
machinery, but have been very general. 
Except for this unusual amount of pros- 
pective business, the market is rather 
featureless this week. It is expected 
that this market condition will extend 
itself throughout next week. Then the 
.actual business of the year will com- 
mence. All Toronto machinery dealers 
seem well satisfied with the way things 
have been shaping themselves during 
the past week. They did not expect 
so many enquiries to be forthcoming- 
during the first week in the year, and 
were consequently agreeably surprised 
at the number that did conic in. So. 
considered from all points of view, this 
week has been as promising for a busy 
time to come as can be expected. 

The A. R. Williams Machinery Co. 
report the market rather quiet, which 
was expected the week before. Pros- 
pective business is good, and therefore 
the prospects for a picking up of the 
trade in a couple of weeks are good. 
The market has been rather featureless 
this week, sales in no special lines of 
machinery attracting much attention. 

The H. W. Petrie Machinery Co" re- 
port business quiet this week, there be- 
ing quite a noticeable decrease of or- 
ders even since the previous week. 
However, that is very usual for the 



tirst week in the year, so that the linn 
are not at all disappointed in the amount 
of business transacted. The number of 
enquiries they have received during the 
past week are remarkable, and are very 
promising for a busy Winter and Spring. 
Otherwise there is no special feature 
on the market this week. 

The Levy, Weston & McLean Ma- 
chinery Co. report that they have not 
noticed much difference in the market 
this week'. The falling off in orders 
have not been felt to any great extent 
by the company. They have had num- 
erous enquiries and the prospects for 
a busy year are good. 

The Jones & Moore Electric Co. say 
that business has been slacker during 
the past week than during the two pre- 
vious weeks. They found it, slacker in 
that they did not receive so many or- 
ders; but they had numerous enquiries 
which in all probability will lead up to 
substantial orders in the future. For 
the last three or four weeks Jones & 
Moore have been been trying to catch 
up on orders during the slack time. Mr. 
Moore says that during the past year 
they have doubled the capacity of their 
factory and consequently their staff 
have also been nearly doubled. 

The Dominion Motor Machine Co. 
•have been quite busy this week repair- 
ing automobiles. They are looking for- 
ward to a bright Winter and Spring. 

The Fairbanks Machinery Co. have 
not got their machinery department 
completely installed yet. They are ex- 
pecting some machinery from Cincinatti 
and also from headquarters at Montreal. 

MONTREAL. 

A round of the various Montreal ma- 
chinery houses shows a general feeling 
of optimism as to the immediate future 
of the Canadian market unless disturbed 
by conditions m the United States. This 
optimistic feeling prevails in spite of 
the recent failure of the James Cooper 
.Mfg. Co. and the embarrassments of 
the Locomotive and Machine Company. 
In both these instances, it is held thai 
the trouble was due to special circum- 
stances and that the embarrassments of 
these (inns can not fairly be interpreted 
19 



as indicating a gloomy outlook for this 
market. The Locomotive and Machine 
Company were forced to ask for an ex- 
tension of time of three, six, nine, and 
twelve months for different amounts 
owing for which they are giving notes. 
It is understood that they have secured 
the assent of the majority of their credi- 
tors to these terms and that they will 
continue in business. Those interested 
in the company have subscribed a suffi- 
cient sum for working capital. In the 
meantime ;inv orders which they may 
place are guaranteed by some personal 
representative of the stockholders. It 
is further understood in Montreal busi- 
ness circles that the liabilities of the 
firm amounted to $850,000, of which 
$400,000 are held by the banks and 
$450,000 by trade creditors. The ar- 
rangement made is considered quite 
satisfactory in local circles and as in- 
dicating the confidence which is felt in 
Montreal as to the ability of the com- 
pany to meet their obligations it might 
be mentioned that a couple of rather 
large sales by Montreal firms to the 
Locomotive and Machine Company are 
reported to us this week. 

Montreal machinery men say that the 
embarrassments of these two firms have 
not so far, had the effect of keeping- 
American machinery houses out of the 
Canadian market. The number of trav- 
ellers who represent American machin- 
ery houses coming to this section of the 
country is on the increase and there are 
rumors of a slashing of prices. Local 
houses would not be sorry if American 
machinery houses were to take the alarm 
and decide to stay away. But they 
think this is too much to hope for. 

The local market has not yet recov- 
ered from the quiet season which is al- 
ways experienced during the holidays. 
Actual business this week has not been 
i f very great volume and most houses 
report that inquiries are not quite so 
numerous as they would like to see. No 
serious alarm is felt, however, for the 
season is not far advanced and it is 
early yet to look for much business. 
Some large sales of machine tools are 
certain to be made before [fling to the 
Grand Trunk and Canadian Pacific 



Hardware and 



MACHINERY 



Railways. I>< tli have been building new 
Stops and neither lias yet bought an 
adequate supply of machine tools with 
which to equip them. Other large buy- 
ers will soon place their orders. Hence 
the outlook in machine tools is good un- 
less a depression in the American mar- 
ket should play havoc with values. In 
heavy machinery, large boilers and en- 
gines of considerable horse-power, pros- 
pects are also good. 

The Laurie Engine Company report 
no particular change in conditions as 
described by them in our last issue. They 
have several contracts on hand for en- 
gines of very large horse-power and 
they are busy executing them in their 
St. Catherine street works. The demand 
for engines of small horse-power came 
(during 1903 from a very wide area. 
Actual business in engines is still quiet 
but inquiries are numerous and the out- 
look is considered quite satisfactory. In 
machine tools and woodworking machin- 
ery, actual business during the week, 
although small, is considered quite satis- 
factory for the season. Inquiries for 
delivery two or three months hence are 
now coming in freely from a wide area. 
The Laurie Engine Company do not as- 
sume the role of prophets and are not 
prepared to forecast the future, but 
they are confident that if nothing hap- 
pens in the United States to demoralize 
values there the Canadian machinery 
business should continue to prosper even 
more than in 1903 which was a record 
year. 

The Fairbanks Company report some 
goqxJ business this week in machine tools. 
Inquiries for delivery two or three 
months hence are numerous and the 
general outlook is considered very satis- 
factory. Trade has not yet recovered 
from the slackness which is always inci- 
dental to the holiday season but that 
slackness has not been so pronounced 
as in some other years. Now that the 
holidays are over, some large sales are 
confidently expected. 

Mr. Alfred Rubra, of the Machinery 
Exchange, reports thai general condi- 
tions remain much the same as last week. 
Trade has not yet emerged from the 
dullness which is always experienced at 
this season. Prospects on the whole are 
bright unless the competition of Ameri- 
can machinery firms has the effect of 
breaking values. Actual business this 
week is, quiet, but some inquiries are 
coming in and a good trade is confidently 
expected during the next few months. 

Mr. W. H. Nolan, of the Canadian 
•Machinery Agency, reports business 



this week fairly active. Like other ma- 
chinery men the only thing which he 
fears is a break in the American markets 
followed by sales in Canada at slaughter 
prices. 

Williams tv Wilson report a quiet, 
steady trade this week which is con- 
sidered satisfactory for the season. 

NEW YORK. 

Manufacturers of machinery are ex- 
pecting a normal year's business in 1901. 
All who were seen report that the year 
just closed has been equal to or better 
than previous years, and that in the be- 
ginning of the year business promised 
to be much in advance of the normal, 
bur that it fell off in the later months. 
December, though, has in all cases shown 
a decided improvement, and the indica- 
tions are that the opening months of 
1901 will continue to show improved con- 
ditions. 

Louis L. Brinsmeade, manager of the 
Westinghouse Machine Company, said: 
' ' We are looking for a much better 
business next year than any we have 
had. This is due to the fact that we 
are the leading manufacturers of steam 
turbines and gas engines, and that these 
machines are rapidly replacing others 
that were formerly used. The steam 
turbines in particular are in constanly 
increasing demand. All the big units 
that are being installed now are tur- 
bines, and we. of course, are getting the 
benefit of that business. The electric 
roads and big electrical power plants 
are all taking to this class of engine 
now to the exclusion of the Corliss en- 
gine, and our business in this line is 
growing right along. Business with us 
did slack up a little a couple of months 
ago, but it has fully recovered now, ami 
we can see nothing in present condi- 
tions to indicate that it will not con- 
tinue to improve. We have not ex- 
perienced any difficulty with collections. 
The nature of our business is such that 
we seldom do have any difficulty in get- 
ting our money. Most of our custom- 
ers are huge corporations that are amply 
provided against any temporary string- 
ency." 

Machinery and Electrical Notes. 

The Moose Jaw Machine Works, 
Moose .law, Assa., were completely de- 
stroyed by fire on Christmas day. The 
estimated loss is $4,500, which is par- 
tially covered by insurance. 

The time for receiving tenders for the 
plant of the lames Cooper Mfg. Co., 
20 



Montreal, has been extended to Monday. 
January 11th. 

The commission to go to Europe to 
investigate the different methods of 
electric smelting, has been appointed by 
the Government. It consists of Dr. 
Haanel, superintendent of mines, and 
C. E. Brown, assistant and works engin- 
eer for the Canadian General Electric 
Co., Petefboro. Dr. Haanel will secure 
in Europe the services of an expert 
metallurgist and such additional assist- 
ance as he may require to make a thor- 
ough investigation of the processes, and 
to determine the possibility of adopting 
any of them profitably in Canada. 

Fire in Laurie Engine Co.'s Plant. 

ON Wednesday, January fith, a fire 
completely gutted the patent stor- 
age building of the Laurie Engine 
Company's works on St. Catherine 
street, Montreal, and resulted in a loss 
of between $15,000 and $20,000. The 
loss of the valuable patterns is a very 
serious matter for the company as it 
will be almost impossible to replace 
them. 

The building was situated in the rear 
of the big engine works on St. Cather- 
ine street east. The foundry proper was 
saved, the only damage resulting from 
water and smoke. 

The alarm sounded about 12.30 o'clock 
and when the firemen arrived at the 
foundry they found the pattern depart- 
ment burning fiercely. In a very feu 
minutes the entire eastern division of 
the fire department were on the spot 
and very soon a do/en or more streams 
were playing on the flames. At one 
time it looked as if the engine Works 
were going to be destroyed, but the work 
of the firemen was well directed and 
this disaster was fortunately averted. 

It is understood that the loss is cov- 
ered by insurance, but it can not fail 
to cause the Laurie Engine Company 
considerable inconvenience. 



Iron Works to be Sold. 

IN our advertising columns will be 
found reference to an important 
sale of the Northrop Iron Works, of 
Valleyfield, Que. These works consist 
of a valuable manufacturing plant in- 
cluding a machine shop, iron and brass 
foundry and carpenter shop. The plant 
is complete with modern equipmentand 
there is some stock on hand. The build- 
ings are thoroughly equipped with auto- 
matic sprinkler system,, and they are 



MACHINERY 



Hardwar* end 
Metal 



Bread, Milk and Trade Checks 

Made of BRASSor ALUMINUM. 

SEND FOR PRICES 

STENCILS, STEEL STAMPS, 
RUBBER STAMPS, Etc. 



Hamilton Stamp & Stencil Works, 



HAMILTON, ONT. 




We Make 
Good 




Write for Catalogue' 

It tells all about 

them. 



The Kerr Engine Co. 



W Walkervllle, Ont, 



Blacksmiths' 

Hand 
Drills. 

The very 
best. 

B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 




"Say, Friend," 

your aim should be to start up for yourself. 

Why Work 

from morn till night for somebody else instead of 
pushing a business for yourself and thus reap the full 
profit of your labor ? 

We Will 

start men of ability and good character in every 
County in the Dominion. 

WRITE FOR PARTICULARS TO 

The Empire Machine and Metal Stamping Co. 

Limited 

1012 Yonge St. - TORONTO, 

Canadian Metal for Canadians. 

IMPERIAL BABBITT. — Perfect antifriction, no matter what the speed or the 
crushing weight. Satisfactory wherever and whenever used. Why experiment with new 
and foreign-made metals, when a Canada-made, thoroughly tried and absolutely reliable 
metal is at your command ? 



THE CANADA METAL CO., ZSggP, TORONTO 



CAP SCREWS. SET SCREWS. 

Square and Hexagon 

COLD PRESSED NUTS 




FINISHED. 



SEMIFINISHED. 



ED 



Canada Foundry Company 

' LIMITED. 

Head Office, TORONTO, ONT. 

District Offices —Montreal, Halifax, Ottawa, Winnipeg 
Vancouver, Victoria, Rossland. 




r 



Use Syracus 



abbit Metal 



IT IS THE BEST MADE. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig 
Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, 
Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc 
Spelter, Phosphor Bronze, Nickel, etc., 
always in stock. 



Canadian Works, Montreal, P.Q. 

American Works, Syracuse, NY 

Head Office American Works. 94 Gild St . New York. 



_/v 



fACTURffRS OF 
PHOSPHOR UN, PHOSPHOR BRONZE 
} 8PA5S INGOTS NCfOlf METAL TVPf 1 
*f£*AtS('C , BdR AIRE PLUMBERS 
*»8>TiNNfJJ'i SOLDERS. *<tO Att | 




iMPOOTTHS JWQ Of e.CRS IN 
fiG rtN.Pt.; LEAD. INGOT COPPtH 
SPECTER. ALl*M|NUM AN TIM Oh V, 

N1CKFL ,8!SN-UTh 

lS£« 



« 



For 

Paper and Pulp Mills, 

Saw and Wood-Working Machine) 

Cotton and Silk Mills, 

Dynamos, Marine Engines, 

and all kinds of 

Machinery Bearings. 



SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS 



21 



Hardware and 
Metal 



piped through for steam heating. The 
entire plant is run by electricity and 
(here is also a complete electric lighting 
plant. The shipping facilities are of 
the best, both by rail and water. The 
Canada Atlantic Railway side track 
inns through the works. 

This is a remarkably desirable manu- 
facturing plant and the situation could 
hardly lie excelled. It is only 35 miles 
from the city of Montreal by rail, either 
by ('. A. R. or N. Y. C, and the same 
distance by water. The property is 
such as would be suitable for almost 
anv manufacturing business. 



MACHINERY 

Feed Water Heater and Purifier. 
r "PHE great problem which confronts 
!_ all users of steam powej" is that 
of securing the most economical 
means of using fuel. Hence any device 
which can be used to lessen the con- 
sumption of coal and still secure the 
same or greater efficiency is always 
eagerly sought after. For this reason, 
" Hardware and Metal " takes pleas- 
ure in ealling attention to the patent 
Feed Water Heater and Purifier manu- 
factured in Montreal by the Laurie 
Engine Company. 

In the description -of this Feed Water 
Heater and Purifiei', two well known 



The Stroboscope. 

"ft THEN an engine or machine is 
VV moving' at great speed, its parts 
appear a mere blur to the spec- 
tator. Now an important improvement 
to a machine may depend on the possi- 
bility of realizing exactly how a certain 
part of the motion at full speed takes 
place. Such is the purpose and powers 
of the stroboscope. A movement that 
really takes place in the hundredth or 
thousandth part of a second may be seen 
drawn out to a quarter of a minute or 
more. The time of the movement may 
be magnified so as to enable it to be 
watched and examined at leisure. 

The means that produce this result 
are very simple. By means of an elec- 
tric spark made at rapid recuring per- 
iods, or by a revolving disc in which are 
slits, passed before a lantern, the mov- f 
ing object is illuminated in a succession 
of flashes. If the flashes coincide ex- C^ 
actly with the period of the machine's M C 
revolution they will show it always in ^p 
the same position, and to the observer^.! 
there will appear to be no motion. By~ * 
slightly retarding the flashes, so that c *-'W 
they will lag behind, the machine under 
observation will seem to move slowly. 
because at each revolution it is shown 
at a little later stage. Thus a movement 
too rapid for direct observation may be 
watched closely and analized the strains 
or vibrations ai every point being clear- 
ly noted. 

Thus with the stroboscope the form- 
ation of the stitch in a sewing machine, 
the exact way in which a petrol motor 
works, and a thousand other machine 
movements of lightning speed may be 
observed. The great glare of the arc 
lamp is not a continuous light but a 
succession of sparks caused by the al- 
ternating current, the intervals between 
which are so short that the nerves of 
the eye act too slowly to catch the rise 
and fall in the illumination. The stro- 
boscope will throw the image of the arc 
upon a screen so that the rise and tall 
of the light appears to take place quite 
slowlv. This the effect of different 
kinds of carbons, different rates .if al- 
ternation and different methods of regu- 
lation can be judged. 




INLET 



facts should be borne in mind. The first 
is thai a very small proportion of the 
heal in steam is utilized in doing work. 
The greater portion is a waste product. 
The second is that the hotter the feed 
water the less coal has to be used to 
turn it into steam. The peculiar merit 
of this feed water heater is that it util- 
izes the exhaust steam, which ordinarily 
is entirely wasted, to heat the feed water 
and it thus proves ils value as an econ- 
omizer of heat, and therefore of fuel. 
These heaters, when applied as rated, 
will raise the temperature of the feed 
water to 208 or 'J 10 degrees, and also 
reduce the back pressure on the engine 
by condensing a large portion of the 
exhaust, 

22 



The accompanying illustration shows 
the internal construction of these heat- 
ers. The shell of body, base, tube plates 
and caps are made of cast iron, and the 
tubes of seamless drawn brass, thus 
making it practically indestructible. 
The tubes are firmly set in a lower and 
upper tube plate, the lower plate only 
being fastened to the body of the heat- 
er. The upper tube plate is not at- , 
tached to the shell in any way, thus al- 
lowing for full and free expansion of 
the brass tubes independently of an- 
other part of the heater. The advant- 
age of this special internal construction 
(patented) of moveable tube plates is 
that by means of it the water may lie 
heated almost to boiling point without 
any danger of tubes bursting or plates 
cracking through expansion or contrac- 
tion. 

The water entering feed " inlet " at 
base (and being distributed by deflect- 
or) passes slowly up through the tubes, 
absorbing heat from the exhaust steam 
with which the heater is tilled, in its 
passage to the upper or discharge cham- 
ber, where it is still surrounded by ex- 
haust steam, until discharged at top 
" outlet." The discharge pipe projects 
downward into chamber to avoid carry- 
ing any scum from the surface of water 
into the boiler, a scum blow-off being 
provided with discharge at bottom of 
heater as shown in cut. 

The impurities in the feed water that 
precipitate at 208 degrees are deposited 
at the bottom of the heater, where pro- 
vision is made for blowing off. The 
" drip " opening at bottom of heater 
provides for draining of condensation, 
and should be connected to drain and 
left open, as an accumulation of water 
in the heater tends to reduce its elfi- 
ciency. 

The tubes may easily be cleaned by 
removing top cover of shell and cap of 
discharge chamber, thus giving access 
to inside. Frequent cleaning is not 
necessary. 

The advantages of this heater are 
many and obvious. The impurities in 
the water are precipitated in the heater 
and hence do not injure the boiler. The 
life of the boiler is prolonged also by 
supplying feed water at a high temper- 
ature, thus preventing unequal contrac- 
tion, such as occurs when feeding cold 
water. As mentioned before, the back ' 
pressure on the engine is reduced by 
condensing a large portion of the ex- 
haust. 

These heaters arc made in various 
horsepowers from .'JO to 2,000. We un- 
derstand that the Laurie Engine Com- 
pany are now building three 2.000 horse- 
power heaters for the Toronto Street 
Hail way Company, 



Till Locks 

Chest Locks 
Cupboard Locks 
>f Cabinet Locks 



RETURNED 

HARDWARE AND METAL tpn a inn./ 

fat $-*€k. q 



and all 
kinds of 




W. F. LAMPLOUGH & CO., 



Montreal, 



It's handy to use our brown and 
manilla 

Wrapping Papers 

because they have strength and 
durability essential to satisfac- 
tory wrapping papers. Full 
weight and full count in every 
order. 

CANADA PAPER CO. 

Limited 
Toronto, Montreal and Windsor Mills, Que. 



Manufacturers' 



Tp A Hardware and 

10 Metal has in- 

quiries from time 
to time from 
manufacturers 
Audits and.otherswant- 

© ing representat- 

ives in the leading business centres here 
and abroad. 

Firms or individuals open for agencies 
in Canada or abroad may have their 
names and addresses placed on a special 
list kept for the information of inquirers 
in our various'offices throughout Canada 
and in Great Britain without charge. 
Address 

Business Manager 

Hardware and Metal 
Montreal and Toronto 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine 
preparation for Cleaning Cutlery 
6d. and is Canisters. 

WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, ete. 

Wellington Hills, London, England 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTRKA.I. 



MADE IN CANADA 



f 





Stitched Cotton 
Duck Belting 

Superior to all others. 

FOR 

Agricultural Machines, Elevators, 
Pulp and Paper Mills, Cotton, Woollen, 
Cement and Saw Mills, Machine Shops 
and Electric Powers. 

manufactured by 

Dominion Belting Company 

Limited 
HAHILTON, CANADA. 

USE OUR 

"MAPLE LEAF BELT DRESSING" 



«• 



# 



^eCrysta/c 




'*. 



RCCISTERE 



TflAOE. MAR* 



\ 



1SOT ADULTERATED WITH EMERY. 

Polishing is fine grinding. Craig Mine Crystal Corundum 
grains will do from two to five times the amount of grinding 
or polishing that grains of emery will do, because it all 
grinds. Emery contains only 30 to 40 per cent, of grinding 
value, the remaining 60 to 70 per cent, is composed of iron 
and silica — waste material. 

WRITE FOR BOOKLET. 



The 



Canada Corundum Company, lhm 



TORONTO, CANADA. 



23 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



RED-LETTER DAY FOR CASH REGISTER MEN. 



THE last week in the old year was a 
red-letter one, as far as the Can- 
adian business of The National Cash 
Register Co. , of Dayton, Ohio, was con- 




Mr. John H. Patterson, President 

cerned. It marked the opening of the 
company's first factory in Canada. For* 
some years the company has been *■ 

doing business in Canada, but this 
business has grown to such an ex- 
tent that it was found necessary to 
have machines for the Canadian 
market made in this country. The 
necessity for the factory was, to do 
small extent, due to the efforts o( 
Mr. F. E. Mutton, the district man- 
ager, and his staff of salesmen. In 
fact, members of the selling staff of 
the Canadian branch of the business 
have more than once carried off the 
honors in the company's world-wide 
service for the largest number of 
machines sold. 

The factory, which is under the 
management of Mr. J. W. DuLaney, 
was formally openea on December 
28th, as already reported in the 
columns of this paper. On the three 
following days conventions were held at 



the King Edward Hotel, where practica 
demonstrations appertaining to the work 
of organization were given by the 
various heads of departments and the 
sales agents in the employ of the company. 

Qn Wednesday evening a banquet was 
held in the private dining-room of the 
King Edward Hotel. It was a function 
of unusual interest and success. It was 
also remarkable for its uniqueness. Mr. 
F. E. Mutton, district manager, was in 
(he chair, and Mr. Crane, of Dayton, 
Ohio, one of the veteran sales agents of the 
company, was toast master. Mr. H. Chal- 
mers, of Dayton, Ohio, general managerof 
the company, and several other officers 
from headquarters, occupied seats of honor 
at the guests' table. \mong the guests 
were also a numhel oT' ladies which, of 
course, added much* grace to the function. 



The one thing which probably impressed 
those outside the members of the firm and 
their employes who were present was the 
marked esprit de corps which existed 








iji] nil 



■i 









■ 


& 




% % 




jtfk-lc} 


Jf^^ 


k 


X 







Mr. F. E. Mutton, District Manager. 



F'actory at Torontc — Front and Rear Vi^Bv 

After the tables had been cleared stere- 
opticon views of the factory and work- 
men's homes at Dayton were given, Mr. 
Thomas being the lecturer for the occasion. 
The views were perhaps the finest of the 
kind ever seen in Toronto. They were of 
enormous proportions and were in natural 
colors. A number of the views showed 
the different stages in the development 
of the factory and also in the improve- 
ment of the workingmen's homes. 
The transformations thus shown were 
greeted with loud applause. For some 
years The National Cash Register Co. 
has awarded prizes for the best lawns 
and back-gardens in the workmen's 
homes, and the work that has been accom- 
plished in this direction is simply mar- 
vellous. After the views had been disposed 
of, the toast list was taken up, and it was 
well after midnight before the last toast 
was proposed and duly honored. 
24 



Hugh Chalmers, General Manager. 

among the heads of the firm and the 
different employes. 

Although I know nothing about cash 
registers beyond the fact that they 
are a good thing for merchants gen- 
\ erally, I felt the influence of this 

| esprit de corps. Every sales agent 

present appeared to be possessed of 
the idea that there was nothing in 
the world like the National cash 
register, and no other firm in the 
world equal that which manufac- 
ture it. 

When Mr. Chalmers, the general 
manager, arose to speak he was 
received with a warmth of enthus- 
iasm which scarcely could have been 
exceeded. Although he is a young 
rhsyi, less than 30 years of age, and 
ars ago entered the em- 
firm as an office boy, 
n61o\e, old and young, holds 
'ghest esteem almost to 
.doration. 
remarked to a well- 
<nown sale^ bfgefit of the company, " that 
you men exhibit such strong loyalty for 
your company and its interests ? " 

" I'll tell you why. It is because they 
treat us ' white ' and we know that if we 
do our duty they will recognize the fact in 





The Factory at Dayton, Ohio. 






a substantial way. And then we belWuw^ 

in the merits of the goods we sell." ^ P y f^ f 

District Manager Mutton was "canec 
about 11 o'clock, and Mr. Du Laney, 
was presented with a valuable umbrella 
by the local sales agents, 



Hardware And 
Metal 



DEPARTMENT OF ADVERTISING 
SUGGESTION AND CRITICISM 



NOTK — Herein are diBcussedthe principles and practice of advertising. Subscrioers are invited to send Mr. Kiikwood specimens 
of their newspapei and other advertising, for the purpose of review in this department. Address care of Department of Advertis- 
ing, Hardware and Metal. 



Edited by 

John C. 
Kirkwood, 

TORONTO. 



Profitable Advertising for Hardware Dealers, 



DN looking through a goodly number 
of Canadian weekly newspapers — 
dailies, loo, -tor examples of ad- 
vertising. [ was struck with the 
absence of hardware advertisements. 
There were dry goods announcements in 
abundance, but comparatively little 
hardware advertising. .lust how to ex- 
plain this condition of affairs is hard. 
It would seem, however, to indicate that 
the hardware dealers belittle the value of 
advertising ; that is, so far as their 
business is concerned. 1 1 seems to indi- 
cate, too, that newspaper publishers have 
not been very active in the direction of 
the development of advertising. Just 
here 1 may say that, judging from my 
own experience, weekly newspaper pub- 
lishers are not very good or very aggres- 
sive advertising solicitors, notvvithstand 
ing the fact that their prosperity depends 
very largely upon the amount of adver- 
tising carried in their newspapers. 1 can- 
not do otherwise than consider it short- 
sighted and a misuse of opportunity for 
a hardware dealer of any pretension or 
ambition not to advertise. Accordingly, 
1 desire at this particular time, at the 
opening of a new year, to talk over very 
briefly this subject. 

With a good many, the question of 
cost is the barrier that stands in the 
way of their advertising. The uncertain- 
ty of its "paying'" is a sufficient reason 
for them to refuse to spend money on 
advertising. The intangible character of 
the transaction is so present with them 
in their consideration of the subject that 
they think of advertising as nothing 
more or less than a gamble. Others, 
again, are unable to judge the value of 
newspaper space, and are inclined to 
think any proposal by a publisher as be- 
ing decidedly too profitable for the pub 
lisher, and dislike exceedingly to enter 
into any contract where the profits are 
-o enormous. 

This question of the cost of advertising 
■ s very apt to be viewed in a very wrong 
and narrow way. No newspaper publish- 
er can guarantee that an advertisement 
in his paper will be profitable, yet this 
is just what many a merchant wishes the 
publisher to do. A publisher sells space, 
nothing more, nothing less He offers 



space in his paper, three inches deep, 
six inches deep, one column wide, two 
columns wide, three columns wide. lb' 
sells space, and this space is worth 
money J how much money depends upon 
the extent and character of the circula- 
tion. He gives merchants an opportun- 
ity through the use of space in his paper 
to tell the community what to buy, and 
where to buy. This opportunity varies 
in worth : If the newspaper has a circu- 
lation of 1,1100. it is worth so much ; if 
the circulation be 2,000* or S.OrlO, the 
opportunity is worth a good deal more 
That is, space in a paper with a large 
and choice circulation is worth more 
than space in a paper with a small cir- 
culation. An opportunity to tell 500, 
1,000, or 3,000 families, a large portion 
of whose money is being spent daily for 
hardware. why this money should be 
spent at one store "rather than at 
another, is worth no small sum to a 
wideawake, aggressive, ambitious retailer. 
Such a man has every week several ex- 
cellent reasons for inviting these families, 
the heads of households, to his store, 
and there is no cheaper, speedier, better 
way to acquaint buyers with his weekly 
offerings than by engaging space in a 
local paper. 

This leads me to say that the burden of 
sale is not on the publisher but on the 
merchant. The publisher sells space, but 
the profitable use of space sold lies with 
the merchant. If a hardware dealer, for 
example, who buys space, neglects to use 
it intelligently, brightly, persuasively, he 
cannot expect his advertising to be pro 
Stable, and, if he be honest, he will 
blame himself for the failure. Having an 
opportunity is one thing ; the right use 
of an opportunity is quite another thing. 
We all have known men to own horses 
which stand idle in their stalls most of 
the time, or else wander about a big 
pasture field. They do no work ; yet wre 
do not say the horses arc no good. It 
is their owners whom we censure. So is 
u with much advertising: Some adver- 
tisements stand unchanged week after 
week, using up space which must be paid 
for : and sonic ramble so thai they fail 
to sell a penny's worth. Such advertis- 
ing is costly, because it represents waste. 

25 



The dealer who advertises, or, rather, 
who thinks he is advertising, by engaging 
space in his local paper and then giving 
neither time nor attention to a right use 
ol this space, mighl just as well cancel 
liis contract . 

In dismissing this question of the cost 
of advertising let me say that a better 
question is— What will advertising yield .' 
Advertising can yield, will yield, and 
does yield a most profitable return on the 
money spent— if done rightly. I know 
hardware dealers in towns where conditions 
are much the same as those that exist in al 
most every community this whole coun 
try over, who are ready to say that they 
could not do business without advertis- 
ing. The cost of advertising doesn't ion 
cern them ; the necessity of advertising- 
was long ago admitted. The business 
producing power of advertising is daily 
perceived. Rut these men put their whole 
thought into their announcements to the 
public and fill the space they employ 
with news that throbs with the activity 
of a busy store. 

The purpose of this department of Ad 
vertising Suggestion and Criticism in 
''Hardware and Metal" is to assist re 
tailers in their advertising. If any hard- 
ware dealer feels himself unable to write 
advertisements that will sell goods, he will 
find in these columns every week some 
thing calculated to help him in this 
direction ; if his difficulties are not being 
met or touched upon, he is urged to 
write a personal letter to the editor, who 
is ever ready to give what assistance he 
can to any interested in this department. 
There is another phase of the advertis- 
ing problem related to cost, yet quite 
another matter ; namely, the question of 
what space to use. It will be found in 
most cases that a small, short, pointed. 
specific, nicely set up advertisement will 
do more work than one which is long, in- 
definite, and loos,. looking. The tempta- 
tion is to tell too much, and the da 
of a Ion" story is that most of it will be 
forgotten. There is waste in advertising, 

some of it inevitable, just as the earpen 
ter's plane makes waste | some of it 
preventable. And there i- a waste in 

not advertising. The greater waste is the 
latter. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Bar Iron 
and Steel 



Cut Nails Horse Shoes 
Wire Nails Horse Nails 



Railway Spikes, Ship 
Spikes and Tacks. 



THE PECK ROLLING MILLS Limited 



Successors to Peck, Bennij £» Co. 



Manufacturers of 




Brands 



riEADomcc: 210 Coristine Building, MONTREAL 

works: LACHINE CANAL. 

"Samson" Milk Can Trimmings. 

Strongest, neatest, most sanitary 
and only one-piece bottom made. 

Has no seams or rivets to cor- 
rode and collect dirt. 

Every bottom in each size is of an 
exact diameter. Being stamped out with 
a die — not spun — there can be no variation as in 
a bottom made in several pieces. 

Requires less solder and work in putting 
together than pieced bottoms — also wears longer. 




Section of "Samson" Milk Can Bottom. 



The McClary Manufacturing Co. 

London, Toronto, Montreal. Winnipeg, Vancouver, St. John, N.B. 
"EVERYTHING FOR THE TINSHOP." 

26 




PATENTED.JULY, 23, 1900 



EDITORIAL 



11 



.dware and 
Metal 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



president | 

•/0/W BAYNE MACLEAN. 

Montreal. 

rhe MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

OFFICES, 

Montreal - - - -232 McGill Street. 

Telephone Main 1255. 

TORONTO - - - 10 Front Street East. 

Telephone Main 2701. 

Winnipeg, Man. - Room 308, Mdntyre Block. 

Telephone 1846. 

E. C. Hind. 

L. P. Luxton. 

LONDON, Eng. - - 100 Fleet Street, E.C. 

J. Meredith McKim. 

Manchester, Eng. - 92 Market Street. 

H. S. Ashburner. 

ST. JOHN, N.B. - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 

New York - Room 1241 New York Life Bldg. 

W. T. Robson. 
Vancouver, B.C. - - Geo. S. B. Perry. 

Subscription, Canada and United States, 82.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s 

Published every Saturday. 

Cable Address J Adscript, London. 
Cable Address j Adscript Canada. 



PRICES CHANGES OF THE WEEK. 

HARDWAREMEN generally have 
learned to look upon the first week 
in January as one of the most important 
during the year, because of the meetings 
of manufacturers to discuss business con- 
ditions and to reach where possible a basis 
of prices for the ensuing season. 

The majority of these meetings have 
been held, and while they were behind 
closed doors the decisions reached have 
been given out and will be found of wide 
interest. . Among the many lines affected 
by the meetings are : Stamped ware, 
coiled spring, galvanized, plain and barb 
wire, cut and wire nails, screws, rivets 
and burrs, tacks, bolts and nuts, lead 
pipe, shot and soil pipe. 

One proof of the steadiness of trade con- 
ditions in Canada was furnished in the 
fact that of the great variety of stamped 
ware productions only one new price was 
established, the discount on creamery cans 
being changed to 50 per cent. 

In several lines the influence of lower 
prices in the United States was felt in a 
slight degree. Reductions of 5c. per 100 
lb. are noted in coiled spring wire and in 
galvanized, plain and barb wire. It is 



O ow well understood that the price on 
galvanized, plain and barb wire is fixed 
on a basis arranged by the American Steel 
and Wire Co., and the Canadian maunfac- 
turers. No reason is assigned for the 
reduction other than the lower basis of 
steel prices in the United States. 

In wire and cut nails prices have been 
fixed at the present basis until May 1, 
after which prices will depend on existing 
conditions. 

In contrast to the reductions noted is 
the action of soil pipe manufacturers who 
have advanced prices by a reduction in the 
discounts. 

Another decision recently reached was 
that of Canadian manufacturers of low 
wheel lawn mowers to allow jobbers to 
sell their wheels at open prices. This was 
done to meet American competition In 
these goods, which has been felt in some 
districts. No change has been made in 
high wheels, as in these Canadian manu- 
facturers have so far been able to hold the 
home market. 

In addition to these changes by manu- 
facturers an important change in tin is 
noted. In the outside markets this metal 
has been exhibiting much strength for 
some time, and the local market has this 
week followed the lead ot primary mar- 
kets by an advance of $1 per 100 lb. 



INDEPENDENCE OF PARLIAMENT. 

AS an academic proposition few peo- 
ple would deny that members of 
Parliament should not be appointed to 
places of emolument. It is desirable 
neither that the vulgar place hunter 
should be encouraged nor that the man 
of independent principles should be 
seduced from the course marked out by 
his best judgment, by the insidious 
temptation of the place bribe. Even 
hardened politicians will accept this 
proposition— when in opposition. 

Back in 1893-94 " Hardware and 
Metal," conducted a campaign along 
this line and found a doughty champion 
in the present Postmaster-General, who 
read extracts from editorials in this 
paper in the House and moved a resolu- 
tion affirming the principle that no mem- 
ber of Parliament should lie appointed 
27 



t<> a public office of emolument while 
sitting in the House or until two years 
after ceasing to sit therein. 

It is not to be assumed that Sir Wil- 
liam, now a knight sans peur et san< 
reproche, and one of his Majesty's Privy 
Councillors for Canada, ripened with 
years and experience, is less zealous lor 
the independence of Parliament, and the 
political morality of its members than 
when plain William Mulock, member of 
her Majesty's loyal Opposition, he 
fought side by side witli " Hardware 
and Metal " to eradicate the blasting 
canker of patronage. 

And yet Mr. Blair has been appointed 
chairman of the Railway Commission, 
Mr. Blair, who opposed the Govern- 
ment's transcontinental railway policy, 
who resigned from the Cabinet, who 
uttered the bitter words " Cox can't 
wait," and who voted with Mr. Borden 
and Mr. Tarte against the Government 
on this imoprtant measure. Then 
Mr. Blair becomes quiescent, his official 
organ declares that since the thing is 
done the only recourse is to support the 
Government. A pause ensues. After 
the pause Mr. Blair is announced as 
having been appointed to the chairman- 
ship of the Railway Commission. 

The shock this appointment must have 
been to the redoubtable champion of 
parliamentary independence and present 
Postmaster-General can better be im- 
agined than described. Let us draw a 
veil. 

With Mr. Blair's personal fitness for 
the position no exception can be taken. 
He was an admirable Minister of Rail- 
ways and the service he rendered his 
country in connection with placing the 
Intercolonial on a sound business basis, 
will not soon be forgotten. It is doubt- 
ful if a man better qualified for the po- 
sition could have been found. But in 
consideration of the principle at stake 
it would have been better had one per- 
haps slightly less qualified been ap- 
pointed. The Liberal party in Oppo- 
sition was unflinchingly opposed to the 
appointment of members of Parliament 
to office. The case of Mr. Blair is a 
particularly flagrant one, all things con- 
sidered, and we are convinced that there 
are many friends of the Government 
who will agree that the appointment 
was ill-advised. 



Ht»rcKv«»r« *nt» 



EDITORIAL 



THE SIGNIFICANCE OF C. I. F. DECISION. 



IN another column will be found a sum- 
mary of the remarks made by Mr. 
Justice Trenholme in giving judgment in 
favor of The Canada Hardware Company 
in their action for damages against Suren 
Hartmann & Company, of London, Eng- 
land, for injuries by rust to a quantity of 
metallic goods bought by the former on a 
c.i.f. contract. The decision is a complete 
victory for the plaintiffs, and as such is of 
great interest to all importers and manu- 
facturers' agents. The question has been 
a vexed one for some time, and there is a 
general feeling of satisfaction that the 
obligations of a seller under a c.i.f. con- 
tract are now clearly defined by the de- 
cision. All uncertainty on the point is 
now removed. The purchaser has a right 
to expect the seller to effect complete in- 
surance, and the seller who neglects to do 
so is liable for damages in case of loss. 

The evidence given at the trial made 
plain one or two things. It was quite 
evident that there has been a great diver- 
sity of custom as to the kind of insurance 
effected under c.i.f. contracts. It was 
also evident that in some quarters there is 
not a very clear understanding of the dif- 
ference between the different kinds of 
marine insurance. 

There are two kinds of marine insurance 
policy. The first is the policy which was 
obtained in the present instance, known 
as f.p.a. (free from particular average). 
This is simply insurance against total loss 
only, as no damages will be paid under 
such a policy unless the injury occurs 
through the stranding, sinking, burning 
or collision of the vessel. The cost of 
such partial insurance is about one-third 
the cost of the " with average " policy, 
which provides complete insurance, cov- 
ering partial as well as total loss. 

It is a satisfaction to business men to 
have this vexatious question settled. No 
person questions the bona fides of either 
party to the contract. Custom has not 
been well established either way. Mr. 
Lomer has for many years been selling 
goods on c.i.f. contracts, and it has al- 
ways been his custom to effect this limited 
kind of insurance. On the other hand, 



the plaintiff never doubted that he was 
receiving complete insurance. The de- 
cision is of interest and importance to all 
business men. 



CANADA DISCUSSED. 

r V HE Sheffield Daily Independent, of 
*■ December 12th, 1903, received a 
few days ago, contains an interesting 
account of a meeting of the Sheffield 
Chamber of Commerce and Manufac- 
tures held on the evening of December 
11th for the purpose of receiving the 
report of their delegates to the big con- 
gress held in Montreal last August. Mr. 



A LIFE SYMPHONY. 
To live content with small 
means; to seek elegance rather 
than luxury, refinement rather 
than fashion; to be worthy, not 
respectable, wealthy not rich; 
to study hard, think quietly, 
talk gently, act frankly. To 
listen to stars and birds, to 
babes and ages with open heart ; 
to bear all cheerfully, do all 
bravely, await occasions, hurry 
never— in a word, to let the 
spiritual unbidden and uncon- 
scious grow up through the 
common: this is my symphony. 
—Canning. 



W. F. Beardshaw, the president of the 
chamber, and one of the prominent dele- 
gates occupied the chair. He said that 
a strung desire had been expressed by 
the members of the chamber to discuss 
the fiscal question, but this night was 
to be devoted to Canadian business. 
His own opinion, and that of the coun- 
cil generally, had been that it was ne- 
cessary first to gather all the facts 
available with regard to English trade 
and the possibility of extending it in the 
colonies. With that end in view they 
had already collected a small library on 
the subject for the benefit of the mem- 
bers. The chamber could not discuss 
the question intelligently until its mem- 
bers had made themselves acquainted 
:>8 



with conditions in Canada. He would 
ask the delegates to give a resume of the 
results of their visit without expressing 
any opinion on the fiscal question which 
was so prominent during their visit. 

It has been the fashion among some 
Canadians to ridicule the Englishman's 
ignorance of conditions and places in 
this country. As was pointed out once 
before in these columns this ignorance 
is no more remarkable and no more to 
be condemned than the lack of geo- 
graphical knowledge which the average 
Canadian displays regarding England 
and the other parts of the Empire. Peo- 
ple who live in glass houses should not 
throw stones. But it would do the Can- 
adian scoffer incalculable good to ex- 
amine carefully the report in this Eng- 
lish paper of the intelligent discussion 
of Canadian potentialities by the Shef- 
field Chamber of Commerce. We doubt 
if an average gathering of Canadian 
business men could discuss English 
affairs any more intelligently. 

The transcontinental tour of which 
advantage was taken by so many of the 
delegates to the congress, was a happy 
idea. It was perhaps the best advertise- 
ment that Canada ever received, for 
every English delegate returned t» the 
old land much impressed with the po- 
tentialities of the premier colony. And 
the delegates are all men of weight and 
influence in their community. The 
speakers at the Sheffield meeting had 
all profited by their tour. They under 
stood something of the immensity of the 
country and they impressed strongly 
upon their fellow members the fact that 
there are practically inexhaustible re- 
sources in Canada waiting to be de- 
veloped. In discussing the proposed 
changes in the Empire's fiscal policy 
it is necessary to consider not merely 
the Canada of to-day with her growing, 
hut limited, market, hut the Canada of 
the near future with several times her 
present population. 

The delegates described their trip 
through the Northwest in the harvest 
time, and it was evident that they fully 
appreciated the force of Canada's claim 



EDITORIAL 



H«rdw*r« ana 
Motel 



to be the ' ' granary of the Empire. ' ' 
British Columbia with its magnificent 
possibilities as a lumbering and mining 
country was not forgotten. Ontario, 
Quebec, and the Maritime Provinces 
with their great industrial possibilities 
were passed in review. The delegates 
had no hesitation in saying that the 
Eastern portion of Canada has a won- 
derful future before it. Notwithstand- 
ing its vast proportions and great ex- 
tent of natural deposits necessary to 
industrial success, it is apt to escape 
the attention it deserves because the in- 




JOHN S. COLE, Jr. 

Recently appointed to represent U. M. C, ammunition 
Remingtoo rifles and B. G I. sporting goods in Canada 



terest of the general public has been 
more directed to the great wheat grow- 
ing tracts of the West. 

The delegates remarked that in the 
industrial establishments visited by 
Ihetn in Canada they noticed an anxiety 
on the part of the workmen to produce 
as huge an output as possible. There 
was no disposition among them, as 
among some English workmen, to re- 
strict the output. Canadian manufac- 
turers were found anxious to use the 
latest labor-saving machinery and their 
men agree with them. 

The transcontinental tour has made 
many P^nglish missionaries who are 
effectively preaching the gospel, of Can- 
ada's boundless resources. 



THE LATE MR. SAMUEL COULSON. 
I T was with great surprise and regret 
that Montreal business men read in 
their evening papers of Tuesday, January 
5th, of the sudden death that same day in 
Toronto of Samuel Coulson, general man- 
ager of the firm of H. R. Ives & Co., 
Montreal. Mr. Coulson was visiting in 
Toronto at the home of his brother, Duncan 
Coulson, general manager of the Bank of 
Toronto, when he was taken so suddenly 
ill. His death, which is attributed to 
heart failure, was a great surprise to all 
bis friends, for w ? hen he left Montreal on 
Sunday night last he was apparently in 
the best of health. Only a few days before 
his death he called at the Montreal othce 
of Hardware and Metal to examine some 
back files of the paper. He seemed then 
in the best of health and spirits, and he 
chatted cheerily of the business prospects 
for 1904. 

The late Mr. Coulson was one of the 
foremost business men of Montreal. He 
was a son of the late Samuel Coulson, of 
the Bank of British North America, of 
Toronto, in which city he was born, but 
lie has been for many years a resident of 
Montreal, and one of her most prominent 
citizens. He was a man of pronounced 
strength of character, endowed with 
pleasing social qualities, and possessed 
of strong business instincts and enterprise. 
He was an active member of the Montreal 
Reform Club, and being a man of readi- 
ness, energy, and facility of expression be 
did excellent service on the club's council. 
For many years Mr. Coulson was an 
ardent supporter of the M. A. A. A., and 
he always took an active interest in all 
wholesome sport. Shrewd in business, 
he was also the soul of good nature, and 
be never missed the opportunity of saying 
a kindly word or assuaging the hurt feel- 
ing. He will be remembered chiefly for 
his social qualities. 

Mr. Coulson attained an early success 
in business in handling the assets of 
bankrupt manufacturing and wholesale 
firms. For a number of years he was a 
bidder upon practically every property of 
this sort which came upon the market, 
and in this way he became possessed of 
the assets of many bankrupt firms, a few 
of which were re-established, but most of 
which were wound up. It was in this 
wav that in 1891 Mr. Coulson became 
possessed of the assets of the firm of H. 
R. Ives, iron moulders of Montreal. His 
intention was to wind up the business, but 
the market for foundry property was not 

29 



ibiii very promising, and on further ex- 
amination he became convinced that there 
was a good opportunity to build up a suc- 
cessful business for himself. Instead of 
selling the plant, he took personal charge 
of it, operated and added to it, and the 
result of his personal supervision is the 
building up of one of the most important 
industrial concerns of Montreal. To the 
foundry business he added an art iron and 
a brass bed branch, each of which is one 
of the largest of its kind in Canada. 
A few months ago Mr. Coulson organized 
the business as a joint stock compan\, of 
which Mr. H. R. Ives is president and 
Mr. Coulson himself first vice-president 
and general manager. Mr. Coulson's 



/ 




The late Mr. Samuel Coulson 

death will therefore not interfere with the 
operation of the business. 

Mr. Coulson was interested in many 
oilier firms, among which might be men- 
tioned that of Coulson, Quinlan & Robin- 
son, who have been awarded a million 
dollar contract of canal repairing on the 
Lachine. 

Mr. Coulson was still in the prime of 
life. He leaves a widow, but no children. 
The funeral took place privately in To- 
ronto on Wednesday, January 6. 



HA1 
d, 



BUSINESS MEN ELECTED. 

iRDWARK AND METAL" is 
desirous of securing a list of 
business men who have been elected to 
the positions of reeve or mayor in the 
various municipalities throughout the 
country. Friends would confer a favor 
by sending such information to the 
Editor of '• Hardware and Metal." The 
full name and particular line of business 
engaged in by the new public servant is 
desired. 



Hardware and 
Metal 





QUEBEC MARKETS. 
Hardware. 

Montreal, January 8th, 1904. 

USINESS has not yet emerged 
from the dullness which is 
always experienced during 
the holiday week. Most of 
the jobbers have now finish- 
ed stock taking, but many of their re- 
tail customers are just commencing this 
rather unpleasant but absolutely neces- 
sary task. Until stock taking opera- 
tions are concluded business can not be 
expected to be very brisk. A few sort- 
ing orders for shelf goods have been 
filled during the week, but on the whole 
trade is still very quiet. There are not 
many changes to record this week. Barb 
and galvanized wire have been reduced 
5 cents. It is said that the reduction 
has been made in order to meet the com- 
petition of the English makers who have 
recently succeeded in placing a few 
orders in this country. All cotton goods 
are advancing and prices for cotton 
rope, sash cord and similar goods are 
very stiff. The position of manila hemp 
is very strong also. Payments are said 
to have been fairly satisfactory. Paper 
for very considerable amounts had to be 
met on the 4th of the month and few 
extensions of time were asked for. 

Spring Hinges— Frequent inquiries 
are reported for spring hinges for 1904. 
Prices for this season are as follows: 
No. 5, $17.25 per gross; No. 10, $18 per 
gross; No. 20, $10.50; No. 120, $20; No. 
51, $9.25; No. 50, $27.50. 

Wire Nails — Trade is now very quiet. 
Mills are still closed down for stock tak- 
ing and repairs. At time of writing a 
meeting of the manufacturers is being 
held at Toronto at which some changes 
in price may be decided upon. If any 
changes are made at this meeting they 
will be announced in our next issue. 
We quote as follows: $2.40 per 
keg in carlots, and $2.45 per 
keg in small lots f.o.b. Gananoque, 
Montreal, London, Hamilton, Toronto, 
Brantford, Windsor, Ont., and St. John. 

Cut Nails — The same remarks apply 
to cut nails, trade in which has been 
quiet since the close of navigation. We 
quote : $2.45 per keg f.o.b. Montreal : 
car lots $2.40. 

Fence Staples— There is no actual 
business this week, but a few inquiries 
Eor Spring delivery are reported and 
the outlook for good 1904 business is 
considered very satisfactory. We 
again quote as follows: $3 per 
100-lb. keg for galvanized, and 
$2.80 for bright; 25 to 50-lb. packages, 
25c extra. 

Pressed Spikes— The discount is 25 



Horsenails— Trade is quiet this week 
at the following unchanged discounts: 
"M" brand, "Oval" and "New City" 
heads, 55 per cent.; "Countersunk" 
heads, 55 per cent.; "C" brand, 40, 10 
and 71-2 per cent, off; "Monarch," 50 
and 7 1-2 per cent, and ' ' Peerless, ' ' 50 
per cent. 

Horseshoes — Trade is now very quiet 
and there is nothing of interest to note. 
We quote as follows : Iron shoes, 
light and medium pattern, No. 2 and 
larger, $3.65; No. 1 and smaller, $3.90; 
snow pattern, No. 2 and larger, $3.90; 
No. 1 and smaller, $4.15; light 
steel shoes, No. 2 and larger, 
$3.80; No. 1 and smaller, $4.05; 
featherweight, all sizes, to 4, $5.35; 
toe weight, all sizes, 1 to 4, $6.60. Shoes 
more than one size in a keg, 10c. per keg 
extra f.ob. Montreal onlv. 

Sleighbells— There was .an excellent 
holiday trade in this line and a few 
orders are still being received. We 
quote the following prices: Back straps, 
30c. to $2 each; body straps, 70c. to 
$2.50 each; shaft gongs, 2 bells, 20c; 3 
bells, 35 to 60c. ; 4 bells, 55c. to $3 each ; 
brass team bells, No. 1, $1.90 per dozen; 
No. 2, $2.40 per dozen; No. 3, $2.70 per 
dozen; No. 4, $3.70 per dozen; No. 5, 
$4.65 per dozen; York eye bells, No. 10, 
$1.35 per dozen; No. 12, $1.65; No. 14, 
$1.90; saddle gongs, $1.10 to $3 each. 

Skates— Trade is now on the quiet 
side after the holiday rush. A few sizes 
have been pretty well cleaned out of 
the wholesale stocks and they would be 
difficult to obtain at present. Prices 
remain unchanged as follows: Halifax 
pattern, 37c. per pair; nickel-plated, 
65c: ladies' nickel-plated, 55c to $1.25; 
ladies' concave nickel-plated, $1.45; 
plain hockey, 27c to $1.35; nickel-plated 
hockey, 60c to $2.50; double end hock- 
ey, $1.65 to $3. Skate straps, 70c to 
$1.35. 

Hockey Sticks— Wholesale stocks are 
pretty well cleared out now that the 
holiday trade is over. One or two houses 
have been offering special price induce- 
ments in order to clear out the small 
supplies remaining in stock. Prices of 
all wooden goods are advancing and 
hockey sticks are almost certain to be 
dearer next season. We quote as follows: 
Best second-growth goalkeeper's, $3.80 
per dozen: ash, $2.70; elm, $2.18; boys' 
elm, $1.10. Regulation pucks, $1.50 per 
dozen; boys', $1.15 per dozen. 

Fire Shovels— Still in seasonable de- 
mand. We quote: No. 70, 39c per 
dozen; No. 55, 55 to 82c per dozen; No. 
57, 82c to $1.10 per dozen; No. 60, 70 
to 88c. per dozen; No. 65, $1.10 to $1.23 
per dozen; Duplex, No. 7, 96c per doz. ; 
No. 9, $1.20 per dozen; No. 11, $1.54 per 
dozen. 

30 



Snow Shovels — In seasonable request 
at unchanged prices. We quote the fol- 
lowing prices : ' ' Habitant, ' ' $2.50 
to $2.75 per dozen; "Victor," 30 per 
cent, off; steel railroad shovels, 45 per 
cent. off. 

Screen Wire Cloth— As expected, 
there has been an advance in screen wire 
cloth which is now quoted at $1.50 per 
100 square feet, an advance of 71-2 
cents. Orders are now being booked 
freely for future delivery. 

Galvanized Wire— As noted above 
there has been a reduction of 5c per 100 
lbs. this week. Inquiries for 1904 trade 
have been coming in more freely this 
week and it is expected that some busi- 
ness will follow the announcement of 
the new prices. We quote the following 
reduced prices: No. 5, $3.65; Nos. 6, 7 
and 8, $3.10.; No. 9, $2.50; No. 10, $3.15; 
No. 11, $3.20; No. 12, $2.60; No, 13, 
$2.70: No. 14, $3.70. In carlots f.o.b. 
Cleveland, No. 5, $2.15; Nos. 6, 7, 8 and 
9, $2.10; No. 10, $2.15; No. 11, $2.20; 
No. 12. $2.25: No. 13, $2.35; No. 14, 
$2.45. In less than carlots, 12 l-2c 
extra per 100 lbs. will be charged. 

Barb Wire— In barb wire there has 
also been a reduction of 5 cents per 100 
lbs. The remarks above will apply to 
barb wire. Inquiries have been fre- 
quent and it is believed that good busi- 
ness will follow the anouncement of 
new prices. We quote as follows: $2.75 
per 100 lbs. f.ob. Montreal and $2.50 
f.o.b. Cleveland. Carlots of 15 tons, 
$2.40 f.o.b. Cleveland. 

Smooth Steel Wire— The market con- 
tinues quiet and without special feature. 
We quote following unchanged prices: 
Bright and annealed, $2.50 per 100 lb. 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Halifax, Lon- 
don, Hamilton and St. John. Net ex- 
tras per 100 lb. are now as follows: 
Coopered wire, 60c; tinned wire, $2; 
oiling, 10c: spring wire, $1.25; best 
steel wire, 75c ; bright soft-drawn, 15c ; 
hay-baling wire, 20 to 25c 

Fine Steel Wire— Trade is quiet at 
present. The discount continues 25 Per 
cent, with net extras as follows: 1 and 
2-lb. hanks, 25c per 100 lb.; 1-2-lb. 
hanks, 371-2c, and 1-4-lb. hanks, 50c 

Brass Wire — Business is fair at un- 
changed discount, viz., 60 per cent. 

Copper Wire— Business fair: discount 
60 per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs— Trade is now very 
quiet and the market is without 
special feature. The discounts are 
still as follows: Best iron rivets, 
section carriage and wagon box, 
black rivets, tinned do., coopers' rivets 
and tinned swede rivets, 60 and 10 per 
cent.; swedes iron burrs are quoted at 
55 per cent, off; copper rivets with the 
usual proportion of burrs, 45 per cent. 
off and coppered iron rivets and hurra. 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and 
Metal 



in 5-lb. carton boxes are quoted at 60 
and 10 per cent, off list. 

Bolts and Nuts— Some American bolts 
and nuts are si ill being offered on the 
Canadian market, although the recent 
increase in discounts has helped to keep 
them out". The bolt manufacturers are 
meeting' in Toronto this week. We 
again quote the following prices : Car- 
riage bolts, common ($1.00) list, 3-16 
and 1-4 diameter, 60 per cent.; carriage 
bolts, common ($1.00) list, 5-16 and 
3-8 diameter, 55 and 5 per cent.; car- 
riage bolts, common ($1.00) list, 7-16 
diameter and up, 55 per cent.; carriage 
bolts, full square ($2.40) list, 60 per 
cent. ; carriage bolts, Norway iron 
($3.00) list, 60 per cent. ; machine bolts, 
3-8 diameter and under, 60 per cent. ; 
machine bolts, 7-16 diameter and larger, 
55 and 5 per cent. : plow bolts, 55 and 
5 per cent. ; blank bolts, 55 and 5 per 
cent. ; bolt ends, 55 and 5 per cent. ; 
sleigh shoe bolts, 70 per cent.; coach 
screws, cone point, 70 per cent. ; nuts, 
square, all sizes, 4c. per lb. off; nuts, 
hexagon, all sizes, 41-4c. per lb. off. 

Washers, 45 per cent. off. 

Cutlery — Trade is now comparatively 
quiet after the holiday rush which was 
the biggest on record. A few sorting 
orders have been filled during the week. 

Screws — Trade is entirely of a sort- 
ing nature at present and its volume is 
not very large. We again quote 
the following discounts off list 
prices: Round head bright, 821-2 
per cent. ; flat head bright, 87 1-2 
per cent. ; brass, round head, 75 per 
cent.; brass, flat head, 80 per cent. 

Shot — Trade is dull and there is no- 
thing to note. We again quote : Ordin- 
ary drop shot, A.A.A. to dust, $6.50 per 
100 lb. ; chilled, Nos. 1 to 10, $7 per 100 
lb.; buck and seal, $7.50 per 100 lb.; 
ball, $8 per 100 lb. Trade discount 
171-2 per cent, f.o.b Montreal, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London, St. John, N.B., and 
Halifax. 

Lanterns— We quote as follows: 
Lift, hinged or tilt, $4 to $4.25 per doz. ; 
cold blast No. 2, $7 to $7.50: painted 
dashboard, $6.50 to $6.75; plain dash- 
board, $6 to $6.25; searchlight, $20 to 
$24 doz.; brass cold blast, small, $9.75 
to $10. 

Cordage — The cordage market is very 
firm at present. The remarks made in a 
recent issue of '"' Hardware and Metal" 
on the condition of the market are con- 
firmed by the following extract from 
the Cordage Trade Journal of December 
17th, '1903: 

" Quotations are extremely firm on 
first quality manila cordage, as the raw 
material has advanced in value, the bet- 
ter grades of manila fibre — such as are 
used in first-class manila cordage — be- 
ing scarce and bringing extraordinary 
premiums over fair current fibre. Un- 
der such circumstances low prices for 
manila rope can only mean inferior 
goods. Those who risk life and property 
should not buy any maila rope that is 
not above suspicon." 

All cotton goods are advancing and 
a rise in cotton rope and sash cord will 



be lulled below. We quote; Pure man- 
ila, 14 l-2c. : British pure manila, 12c. ; 
sisal, lll-2c. ; double lathyarn, lie; 
single lathyarn, 101-2c. ; Russian tarred 
spunyarn 131-2c.; jute rope, 3-8-in. in 
diam. and upwards, 9c; cotton rope, 
21c. ; cotton twine, 20 and 23c. tor 
3 and 4 nlv. Cotton bedcord, 90c. to 
$1.70, according to length. Sash cord 
29c. 

Building Paper— Trade is very quiet 
at present. We again quote: Tarred 
felt, $1.85 per' 100 lb.; 2-ply 
ready roofing, 90c. per roll; 3-ply, 
$1.15 per roll'; carpet felt, $2.25 per 100 
ib. ; dry sheathing, 40c per roll; tar 
sheathing, 50c. per roll: dry fibre, 55c. 
per roll ; tarred fibre, 65c. per l'oll ; O.K. 
and I.N.L., 70c per roll ; heavy straw 
and sheathing, $35 per ton; slaters' felt, 
65c. per roll. 

Cement— There is nothing doing at 
present and not activity can be expected 
until Spring. We again quote the 
following prices: Canadian cement, 
$1.90 to $2.25; German, $2.25 to $2.40; 
English, $2.15 to $2.25 ; Belgian, $1.70 to 
$1.95 per bbl., ex store, and American, 
$2.20 to $2.40 ex-cars. 

Firebricks — Trade continues very dis- 
appointing. Prices are unchanged, Eng- 
lish being quoted at $16 to $22 per 
1,000, and Scotch at $17 to $22. 
Plumbing Goods. 

The long continued activity in plumb- 
ing goods has quieted down and had it 
not been for the demands from the city 
trade for iron pipe and similar supplies 
to repair leaks and bursting pipes con- 
sequent to the extreme cold there would 
have been little business this week. 
Prices of solder have stiffened a trifle 
in sympathy with the advance in tin. 
Iron pipe continues easy but other sup- 
plies are firmly held. 

Lead Pipe— A good average trade is 
reported this week at firm and unchang- 
ed prices. Composition and waste are 
selling at 8c. and ordinary at 7c. The 
discount is 35 per cent. 

Iron Pipe— The cold weather caused 
the bursting of many pipes in the city, 
and in consequence there have been 
many hurry calls from city plumbers. 
This has in fact been the feature of the 
plumbing market this week. Prices are 
easy, and as has been remarked in these 
columns for some weeks back conces- 
sions of as much as 10 per cent, are ob- 
tainable for good business. Subject to 
these remarks we again quote as 
follows: Standard pipe, per 100 
feet, in lengths under 19 feet— black, 
1-8-in., $2.30; 1-4-in., $2.30; 3-8-in., 
$2.55; 1-2-in., $2.85; 3-4-in., $3.65; 1-in., 
$5.20; 1 1-4-in., $7.35; 1 1-2-in., $8.95; 
2-in., $12.55. Galvanized-l-4-in., $3.20; 
3-8-in., $3.45; 1-2-in., $3.90; 3-4-in., $5; 
1-in., $7.20; 1 1-4-in., $10.05;' 1 1-2-in., 
$12.20; 2-in., $16.85. Extra heavy pine, 
plain ends, are quoted per 100 feet as 
follows: Black, 1-2-in., $4.20; 3-4-in., 
$.1.25; 1-in.. $7.55; 1 1-4-in., $10.55; 
1 1-2-in., $12.75; 2-in., $17.60. Galvan- 
ized— 1-2 in., $5.20; 3-4-in., $6.65; 1-in., 
$9.55; 1 1-4-in., $13.25; 1 1-2-in., $16; 
2-in.. $21. 

31 



Soil Pipe and Fittings— In stead] 
request at the following unchanged dis- 
counts from the list prices: Light 
soil pipe, 3 to 6-iu., 50 and 10 
per cent.; medium and extra heavy 
soil pipe, 2 and 6-in., 60 per cent.; ex- 
tra heavy soil pipe, 8-in., 45 per cent. 
Light fittings, 2 to 6-in., 50 and 10 per 
cent.; medium and extra heavy fittings, 
2 to 6-in., 60 and 5 per cent.; extra 
heavy fittings 8-in., 45 per cent. 

Solder— In sympathy with the strong 
tin market ther has been an advance in 
solder. We now quote: Wire solder. 
I8e; bar, 17 l-2c. 

METALS. 

Stuck taking is interfering with busi- 
ness this week and will probably con- 
tinue to do so for another fortnight. 
Buyers are not willing to load up with 
new stock until stock taking is complet- 
ed. In pig iron there is nothing doing 
this week. Canada plates have stiffen- 
ed ih primary markets as much as 2s. 
6d per ton. There have been numerous 
inquiries during the week and buyers 
have made offers which we understand 
have not been accepted. There is con- 
siderable inquiry for galvanized iron and 
some large orders will likely be booked 
very soon, but actual trade this week 
has been on the quiet side. Tin cmi- 
tinues to rise in the primary markets 
and sympathetic advances have been 
made locally. Tinplates are also very 
firm. A few small sales were made this 
week. 

Pig Iron— As stated above, trade is 
still very quiet owing to the fact that 
most buyers are busy stock taking. Lon- 
donderry iron is not yet on the market 
but will be very soon . We quote: Sum- 
merlee, $19.25 to $19.75; Carron, No. 1, 
$21 ; do., No. 3, $18.50 to $19 ; Middles- 
boro', No. 3, $17 to $17.50; Ayersome, 
Xo. 1, $20; do., No. 3, $19.40. 

Bar Iron— Business is dull 4his week 
and the market is not regarded as par- 
ticularly strong. Quotations remain as 
before. Merchants' bar, $1.85; horse- 
shoe iron, $2.10; forged iron, $2.05. 

Black Sheets— Prospects are good for 
an active trade later on. Inquiries are 
numerous but actual business is not very 
great this week. We quote: 28 gauge, 
$4.25; 26 gauge, $2.40; 22 to 24 gauge, 
$2.35; IS to 20 gauge, $2.30, and S to 
10 gauge, $2.40. 

Galvanized Iron— Inquiries are num- 
erous at present and some heavy Inly- 
ing is expected before long. Actual 
business this week is not very consider- 
able. We quote as follows: Gorbal's 
"Best Best," $4.30; 28 Queen's 
Head, $4.30; Apollo, 10 3-4 oz., 
$4.30; Fleur-de-Lis, $4; Comet, $4; Bell 
brand, $4. In less than case lots 25c. 
extra. 

Tinplates— Some sales are reported 
this week, but not of very large quanti- 
ties. In sympathy with the advance in 
tin, tinplates are very firmly held. We 
quote generally: Cokes, $3.75 and char- 
coals, $4. 

Ingot Tin— In sympathy with the 
stiffening in primary markets local prices 



Hardware and 
Metal 



THE MARKETS 



have been marked up. Some pood sales 
are reported to have been made during 
the week as the indications point to a 
still further advance. The lowest price 
obtainable now would be 32c. and an 
order would require to be large to be 
filled at that price. For small quantities 
the price is 32 1-2 to 33c. and a further 
advance is probable. 

Terne Plates— Business is said to have 
been quite active this week. Prices 
range from $6.75 to +7. 

Coil Chains — Trade continues fairly 
active at the following prices: No. 6, 10c; 
No. 5, 9c. ; No. ' 4, 8 l-2c. ; No. 
3, 7c; 1-4-in., $6.10; 5-16-inch, $4.70; 
3-8-in., $4; 7-16-in., $3. SO; 1-2-in., +3.70: 
9-16-in., $3.55; 5-8-in., $3.35: 3-4-in., 
$3.30; 7-8-in., $3.25; and 1-in., $3.20, 
with 10c allowance on carlots. 

Canada Plates— As noted above prices 
have stiffened oh the primary markets. 
There have been numerous inquiries but 
little actual business during the week. 
We quote as follows: 52.S., $2.40; 
60s.. $2.45 to $2.50; 75s., $2.5."): full 
polished, $3.60, and galvanized, $4 to 
$4.10; galvanized, 60s., $4.25 to $4.35. 

Steel — Business is only fair. We quote: 
Sleighshoe, $1.95 to $2; 'tire. $2 to $2.10; 
spring, $2.75 to $3; reeled machinery. 
$2.75 to $3: toe calk. $2.60; 'machinery 
(iron finish) $2.50; square harrow, 
$2.50. 

Tool Steel— A satisfactory volume of 
business is passing at the following un- 
changed prices: Black Diamond, 8 to 
9c.; Sanderson's, 8 to 9c, according 
to the grade; Jessop's, 13c; Jonas & 
Oolver's, 10 to 20c; " Air Hardening," 
50 to 65c per lb. ; Conqueror, 7 l-4c 

Ingot Copper— Prices as quoted last 
Week remain unchanged. Quotations are 
being well maintained as primary mar- 
kets are firm. We quote: $13.50 to 
$13.7:. per. 100 lbs. 

Pig Lead— Quoted at $3.20 to $3.30. 

Sheet Zinc — Business is fairly active at 
steady prices. We quote $6.15 to $6.25 
for cask lots; smaller quantities, $6.50. 

Zinc Spelter— The price is 6c. 

Scrap Metals— Trade continues very 
quiet and there are no changes to report 
this week. We quote the following 
prices: Heavy copper and wire, 9 1-2 
to 10c per lb.; light copper 10c; heavy- 
red brass, 10c; heavy vellow, 81-2c: 
light brass. 51-2c; lead, 21-4 to 21-2c; 
zinc, 2 3-4 to 3c; iron, No. 1 wrought. 
$11 to $12: machinery scrap. $13 to $15; 
stove plate, $12; mailable and steel, $6: 
mixed countrv rags, 60 to 70c per 100 
lb.; old rubbers 6 to 61-2c per lb. 

Ashes. 

The market is without special feature 

lo note. Wc again quote: 

First pots, per uwl 5 % 6 00 

Seconds 5 55 

Pearls, per 1001b 7 00 7 25 

Hides. 

Receipts from country points con- 
tinue to be liberal. Quebec is not taking 
any very large supplies and the market 
is therefore not particularly strong. 
Wc quote : : 



No. 1 beef hides (8 C8J 

No. 2 " 07 07J 

No. 3 " 06 06J 

Lambskins 75 

No. 1 calfskins 10 

No. 2 '• 08 

ONTARIO MARKETS. 
Hardware. 

Toronto, January 9, 1904. 

Tills feature of the situation during 
the week is the meetings of 
various manufacturers' associa- 
tions to discuss their prices for the 
year. Among the lines represented were 
lead pipe, shot, coiled spring, galvan- 
ized, plain and barb wire, wire nails', 
stamped ware, cut nails, rivets and 
burrs, tacks, screws, bolts and nuts. 
Reductions id' 5c. are reported in coiled 
spring, galvanized, plain and barb wire. 
A new price has been made for cream- 
ery cans. Soil pipe is 5c. higher. Other- 
wise there is no change, manufacturers 
deciding that the conditions warranted 
tlie continuance of present quotations. 
Travellers started on the road last Mon- 
day, hut have not done a large volume 
of business, as there has been a gener- 
al disposition to defer buying until 
prices had been fixed. The general 
opinion is that prospects are ( xcellent, 
that the Spring trade in all pails of the 
country "ill he well up to the high mark 
of former years. The only depressing 
influence is the offering of American 
goods in this market. This is not gen- 
eral, yet is frequent enough to make 
many manufacturers uneasy and to 
create a widespread feeling of conserva- 
tism as to the output of manv lines for 
the season. The present year is likely 
to be one which will call for sound judg- 
ment on part of buyers. It would be 
well for all such to guard against too 
great caution in buying as the conser- 
vatism of manufacturers might lead to 
a shortage in some lines as was the case 
during the last Summer and Fall sea- 
sons. On the other hand conditions, 
local as well as national, should be 
studied with some care before large or- 
ders are given. 

Galvanized Wire— Manufacturers and 
jobbers have agreed to an all-round re- 
duction of 5c A good business is an- 
ticipated. Prices are now as follows: 
No. 5. $3.65; Nos. 6. 7 and 8. $3.10; No. 

9. $2.45; No. 10, $3.15; No. 11. $3.20; 
No. 12. $2.60; No. 13, $2.70: No. 14. 
$3.70. hi carlots f.o.b. Cleveland, No. 
5, $2.15; Nos. 6, 7. 8, and 9, $2.10; No. 

10, $2.15; No. 11. $2.20; No. 12, $2.25; 
No. 13. $2.3:.; No. 14. $2.45. Tn less 
than carlots, 121-2c per 100 lbs. extra 
charged. 

Barb Wire— There has been some en- 
quiry but buyers have held back, thus 
securing a reduction of 5c Prices are 
now steady as follows: $2.75 per 100 
lbs. f.o.b. Toronto, and $2.50 f.o.b. Cleve- 
land. Carlots of 15 tons, $2.40 f.o.b. 
( 'leveland. 

Coiled Spring Wire — There has not 
been much business done to dale hut 
with a reduction of 5c. this week it is 
expected that trade will open up nicely. 

A 2 



Prices are now as follows: No. 9, $2.70 
per 100 lbs. f.o.b. Cleveland, freights 
equalized with factory points at Hamil- 
ton, London, Welland or Windsor and 
allowance to other points up to 25c; 
carlots, $2.65, freight allowance to 20c. 

Screen Wire Cloth— The new prices 
quoted last week are now in effect and 
a fair business has opened at $1.50 per 
100 square feet. 

Spriiig Hinges — A fair business has 
opened up. Prices quoted for the 
year are as follows: No. 5, $17.25 
per gross; No. 10, $18 per gross; No. 20, 
$10.50; No. 120, $20; No. 51, $9.25; No. 
50, $27.50. 

Wire and Cut Nails— Buyers have 
been waiting for the meetings re prices. 
No change was made. Prices steady 
with the base price $2.45 per keg f.o.b 
Toronto. 

Screws— No change is reported in this 
line. A fair business has been done. We 
quote: Flat head bright, 871-2 per cent, 
discount: round head bright 82 1-2 per 
cent.; flat head brass, 80 per cent.; round 
head brass, 75 per cent. : round head 
bronze, 70 per cent.: flat head bronze. 
75 per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs— Business is quiet 
and prices unchanged. Our quota- 
tions are: Iron rivets, 60 and 10 
per cent, discount; iron burrs, 55 per 
cent.; copper rivets, with usual propor- 
tion of burrs, 45 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts— There are still some 
United Stales bolts and nuts offering, 
but the sale of them is so small that 
Canadian manufacturers are allowing 
prices to stand. We quote: Car- 
riage bolts, common ($1 list), 3-16 and 
1-4-in.. 60 per cent.; 5-16 and 3-8-in.. 
55 and 5 per cent.: 7-16 and up, 55 per 
cent.; carriage bolts, full square ($2.40 
list), 60 per cent.: carriage bolts, Nor- 
way iron ($3 list), 60 per cent.; ma- 
chine bolts, .3-8 and less. 60 per cent.: 
7-16 and up, 55 and 5 per cent.; coach 
screws, cone points. 66 2-3 and 10 per 
cent. 

Cordage— The big advance in cotton 
cordage is still maintained. A fair 
business is doing. We quote: Pure 
manila. 141 -2c: British pure manila. 
12c: sisal. lll-2c: double lathyarn. 
lll-2c: single lathyarn. lie; double 
shingleyarn. 11 l-2c : single shingleyarn. 
lie; sasheord "Hercules." 29 to 30c: 
" Star." 36 to 40c; cotton rope. 3-16 
in. and up. 20 1-2 to 22c: 5-32-in.. 25 to 
27c: 1-8-in.. 25 to 28c: cotton twine. 
3-p]y. 22 to 24c. : 4-ply. 26 to 28c 

Skates— There are still a few orders 
coming in but stock's are beginning to 
run pretty low. Prices are steady. 

Harness— A particularly good demand 
for sleighbells and horse robes is report- 
ed, at steady prices. 

Snow Shovels — A nice trade has been 
done, a feature being the demand for 
heavy shovels. 

Wood enware — There is practically 
nothing doing. Prices show no change. 
We quote pey dozen: Washboards, Yiet<n 



THE MARKETS 



Hftrflwurr 



•I.. I 



PORTLAND CEMENT 

CANADIAN, ENGLISH, 

GERMAN and BELGIAN. 

FIRE BRICKS, FIRE CLAY, 

ENAMELLED BRICKS, all colors. 
BUILDING BRICKS. 

SEWER PIPES, CULVERT PIPES, 
WHEELBARROWS, 

FOUNDERS' and CON 

TRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 
. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWERPJPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

ft| t CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON. ONT. T0R0NT3. ONT 
ST. JOHNS OUC 



Deseronto Iron Co, 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers or 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleab'e 
Castings, Boiler lubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery whi-re great strength 
i*r quired- Strong, High Silicon Iron, f^r Foundn 
Purposes. 



tt 



MIDLAND 



J? 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Writs for Price to Sales Agents 

Drummond McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE. 



or to 



Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. Limited 



$1.35; Crown, $1.45; Improved Globe, 
$1.60; Standard Globe, $1.70; Original 
solid Globe, $2; Superior Solid Back 
Globe, $2.15 ; Jubilee, $2.10 ; Pony, 95c. ; 
Dominion King (jj/lass), $3.10. Tubs, 
No. 0, $10.50; No. 1, $8.50; No. 2, $7.50; 
No. 3, $6.50. Pails, No. 1, 2 hoops, 
$1.75 and $1.90. 

Building Paper— Prices have been 
lixed for the first three months of 10(11 
at present quotations. "We quote tin' 
following prices: Tarred felt. $1.85 
per 100 lb.; 2-ply ready roofing, 
90c. per roll ; 3-ply, $1.15 per roll ; car- 
pet felt, $2.25 per 100 lb.; dry sheath- 
ing, 40c. per roll; tar sheathing, 50c. per 
roll; drv fibre, 55c. per roll; tarred fibre. 
65c. per roll; O.K. and I.X.L., 70c. por 
roll; heavy straw and sheathing, $35 per 
ton; slaters' felt, 60c. per , roll. 

Cement— The cement market is dull 
this week. We again quote : Canadian 
Portland at $2.05 to $2.65 Toronto, and 
$1.65 to $1.90 at the works: American 
Portland, $2 Toronto. 

Firetricks— The market in firebricks 
is brightening, with good demand at 
present. Our quotations are: 28 to 33c. 
for English, and 30 to 35c. for Scotch. 

PLUMBING GOODS. 

A fair business is doing thought, of 
course, this is the dull season. Prices 
are steady throughout except in iron 
pipe, which - is rather easy. Retail 
plumbers in the city have had an ex- 
tremely busy season at repair work ow- 
ing to the severe weather and the freez- 
ing of many pipes. 

Lead Pipe — There is not much doing. 
Prices are steady as follows : Lead, 7c. ; 
lead waste pipe, 8c; discount 35 per 
cent. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— Trade con- 
tinues much the same as last week. We 
quote : Light soil pipe, 45 and 5 per 
cent. ; light soil pipe fittings, 50 and 
5 per cent; medium and__extra heavy 
pipe and fittings, 55 and 5 per cent. ; 7 
and 8-in. pipe, 40 and 5 per cent. 

Iron Pipe Fittings— Moderate business 
is reported. We quote the follow- 
ing discounts : Malleable fittings, 15 
per cent.; cast iron (not standard), 
571-2 per cent.; headers, 521-2 per 
cent.; flanged unions, 521-2 per cent.: 
bushings and plugs, 571-2 per cent.: 
unions, 55 per cent ; nipples, 2-in., 65 
per cent.; nipples, 21-2 to 6-in., inclu- 
sive. 60 per cent. 

Copper Range Boilers— Trade in cop- 
per range boilers is fair; last week's dis- 
counts at 15 per cent, continue. 

Brass Goods— Business in steamfitters' 
brass goods is fair with prices steady. 

Iron Pipe— The market in iron pipe 
is quiet this week. We quote f.o.b. 
Toronto as follows: 1-8-in., $3.25; 1-4- 
in., $2.30; 3-8-in., $2.55 ; 1-2-ii... $2.85; 
3-4-in.. $3.65; 1-in., $5.20; 1 1-4-in.. 
$7.35; 11-2-in., $8.95; 2-in., $12.55; 
21-2-im, $19.25; 3-in., $22.75; 3 1 -2-in.. 
$28.75; 4-in., $35.25. 

METALS. 

There is not much doing. Travellers 
are out but have found manufacturers 



;::; 



"DOMINION CROWN" 

Polished Sheet 
Steel. 

Best substitute for Russia Iron. 
Unequalled value. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

509-512 Merchants Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 




OUR goods have a 
reputaiion thai 
we aim continually to 
keep up. So you are 
sure of having good 
pumps when you 
handle ours. 

McDougali 
Pumps 

are made of iron and 

are guaranteed to be 

satisfactory. 

Ferxl for rn'alofiue 

McDougali Pumps 
- Made in Canada 



The R. McDougali Co., Limited 



GALT, ONTARIO. 



All progressive dealers now 
And it advantageous to stock 

Gilbertson's "COMET" 
Galvanized Sheets and 
Galvanized Canada 

Dloipc Quality and price 

W. GILBERTS0N & CO, Limited, 
near Swansea, Eng. Makers. 

ALEXANDER GIBB, MONTREAL, 

Canadian Heprcsentative. 



Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers o f ™ ■ 

Ferrona Pig lion 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



Hardware 
Metal 



and 



THE MARKETS 



throughout the country to be busy stock 
taking or taking things easy after the 
holidays, consequently there is little 
disposition to buy. Reports re iron and 
steel in the United States are not en- 
couraging and an easy feeling is reflect- 
ed here in both pig and bar iron. Tin 
lias been stiffening on outside markets 
all week except on Tuesday, when a de- 
cline set in. Locally prices are lc. high- 
er. Copper, lead and other ingot metals 
are firmer outside. Sheet metals are 
also steady. 

Pig Iron— Business is still slow as 
buyers have not settled down to securing 
materials since 'the holiday season. 
Prices are unchanged with Midland and 
Hamilton iron nominally $18.50 for No. 
land $18 for No. 2 at the mills. 

Bar Iron— Competition for business 
is still keen, but there is not as great 
a disposition to cut prices. Quotations 
are now as follows: $1.80 f.o.b. 
Toronto for extras cut to length 
while rolling; 2 ft. and over, 10c. per 
100 lb. ; 1 ft. and under 2 ft., 15c. ; under 
1 ft. 20c, over 20 ft. by special agree- 
ment according to length and size. 

Black Sheets — Prices are unchanged, 
a fair business doing. We quote : 10 to 
16 gauge, $2.50; 18 "to 20 gauge, $2.70; 
22 to 24 gauge, $2.90; 30 gauge, $3. 

Canada Plates— Our quotations have 
been high, so are this week lowered 10c. 
There is not much doing. We quote : 
All dull, $2.50; half-polished, $2.60: and 
all-bright, $3.50. 

Tin — A fairly good business has been 
prompted by the stiff market. An ad- 
vance of $1 per 100 lbs. is noted on the 
local market, which change is a result 
of higher values on the larger markets. 
We now quote prices at $30.50 to $31.50. 

Galvanized Sheets— A fair trade is 
doing at steady prices. We quote : 
Queen's Head, $4.25 to $4.50 for 28 
gauge ; American, $4.40 for 24 gauge ; 
Bell brand, $4.25 for 28 gauge; Gordon 
Crown, $4.25 for 28 gauge. 

Tinplates— A better feeling prevails. • 
despite American competition. We 
quote as follows: Coke plates, bright, 
14x20, $3.75; charcoal plates, $4.25! 

Copper— Prices in British and U. S. 
markets are still stiffening. The 
local market, while considerably 
stronger, shows no change, prices being 
as follows: Ingot copper, $14, and sheet 
copper, $20 per 100 pounds. 

Brass — There is a fair trade, with the 
discount steady at 15 per cent. 

Lead — A considerable advance is re- 
ported at outside market, but local quo- 
tations are steady. We quote: $3.30 per 
100 lb. for pig lead and $3.65 for bar 
lead. 

Zinc Spelter — Prices show an upward 
tendency at primary market, but the 
local situation is unchanged at 6 to 
6 l-2c. per lb. 

Zinc Sheets— The market is firm and 
a fair business doing. We quote: Cask 
lots, $6.75 to $7, and part casks, $7 to 
$7.25. 

Solder— Good trade doing. Prices 
;uv si ill stiffening. Wo quote: Guaran- 




"GREAT-WESTERN" 
BRAND 



FILES 



Warranted. 



These goods are used in the largest Saw Mills, Machine Shops and Foundries throughout the U S 
and Canada on account of their SUPERIOR QUALITY. 

For sale in Canada by the following prominent Hardware Merchants : 



J. H. Ashilown Hardware Co., Limited, Winnipeg. 
Hickman, Tye Hardware Co., Limited. Victoria. 
( limn- Hardware Co., Quebrr 



McLennan. MeFeely & Co., Limited, Vancouver. 
L. H. Heliert, Montreal. 
Black Bros. & Co., Halifax. 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers ot 
Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs, 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 
INGERSOLL, ONT. 



^^ NEW 

Rails 



12 , 14, 16, 18, 20, 24, 3 0, 35 and 56 lbs. to 
the Yard — carried in STOCK for prompt ship- 
ment. TRACK REQUISITES. 



Sesscnwein Bros., 



103 Shannon St. 

. . MONTREAL. 



"We invite 

inquiries 

for 



STEEL RAILS, 



BAR IRON, PIG IRON GALVAN- 
IZED IRON, CANADA PLATES, 
TINPLATES, WIRE ROPE (W. B. 



BROWN & CO,), CEMENT, 



FIREBRICKS, ORE BAGS, GRAIN BAGS, ETC. 



C. F. JACKSON & CO., Limited, IMPORTERS and COMMISSION ENCHANTS 

151 Hastings St. W., VANCOUVER, B.C ., and LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND. 



teed half-and-half at 18c, and wiping, 
17c. 

Old Material— There is practically no- 
thing' doing' in the market this week. 
Dealers in these lines like those in many 
others are waiting patiently till the be- 
ginning of the year when they expect 
business will wake up and be up to the 
regular level again. Machinery cast 
scrap is selling lower this week, prices 
ranging from $13 to $14. Malleable and 
steel also have dropped $2, bringing the 
price down to $4. We quote the fol- 
lowing: Heavy copper and wire, 10c. per 
lb. ; lipht copper, 9c. per lb. ; heavy red 
brass, 9 3-4c. per lb. ; heavy yellow brass, 
8c. per lb.; light brass, 5c. per lb.; lead, 
2 l-4c. per lb. ; scrap zinc, 3c. per lb. ; 
iron, No. 1 wrought, $10.50; No. 2 
wrought, $4; machinery cast crap, $13 
to $14: stoveplate, $10; malleable and 
steel, $4; old rubbers, 61-8c. per lb.; 
country mixed rags, 50c. per 100 lb. 

Seeds. 

The seed market is more active with 
prices as a rule higher for choice seed. 
The recent severe weather has some- 
what checked the supply of seed com- 
ing from the farmers. We quote: 

Red clover, per bush 5 50 6 00 

Alsike " 4 75 5 75 

Timol liy, per " 115 1 50 

Bail threshed 175 

34 



Hides, Skins and Wool. 

The market continues dull. The only 
lines meeting a noticeable demand are 
lamb and sheepskins, which have risen 
5c. This is the only change in prices this 
week. We quote : 

HIDES. 

No. 1 green, per lb o 07J 

" ? " " .... 006| 

1 steers, per lb o 08 

" 2 " " " o 07 

Cured, per lb 08} 

CALFSKINS. 

Veal skins, Mo. 1, 6 to i* id. inclusive 09 

' " "2 ' 07 

" 1 15 to 20 lb " 08 

2 " " 06 

Deacons (dairies), each 60 70 

Lamb and sheep skins o 90 

WOOL. 

Unwashed wool, per lb o 09 10 

Fleece wool, " 16 174 

Pulled wools, super, per lb o 17 19 

extra " o 20 21 

Tallow, per lb 041. 042 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, Jan. 3. 1904. 

HARDWARE houses are having a 
quiet time and bending all enei'Lru's 
to getting the remnants of last 
year's business cleared up. There have 
been no changes in the price-list, and of 
course the jobbing trade of the week be- 
tween Christmas and New Year's is very 
light. A glance over the past year 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and 
Metal 



shows an increase oi about 30 to 35 per 
cent, in the hardware trade dour. 

The year 1903 will be chiefly remem 
bered by the remarkable increase in the 
manufacture of structural iron in the 
West and the great extension of the man 
ufacturing capacity. Orre new company, 
the Manitoba Iron Works, is purely a 
growth of the past year, and with their 
six huge buildings and a moulding capa- 
city of seven tons an hour they are a 
fine example of western progress. The 
veteran iron company, the Vulcan Iron 
Works, have extended their premises by 
an enormous foundry, which more than 
doubles their foundry capacity. The 

Northern Iron Works Co. suffered the en- 
tire loss of their plant by fire, erected 
temporary buildings and managed to fill, 
all contracts undertaken before the fire, 
and have all plans ready for the erection 
of very extensive permanent buildings 
next Spring. The Stewart. Machine Co. 
greatly enlarged their works during the 
year, but sold out before the close of the 
year. The new firm will extend the busi- 
ness next year. These mark the greatest 
changes for the year, and there are 
numerous smaller ones that all go to 
mark the progress of western manufac- 
tures. 

The holding of the Dominion Exhibition 
here next July, with the interest that will 
be taken in it by the Canadian Manufac- 
turers' Association, will no doubt tend 
greatly to further manufacturing develop- 
ments in the West. In implement manu- 
factures, The Western Implement Co. did 
not succeed in completing their large new 
factory, but this will be in operation in 
the early Spring, and there are other 
lines of implement making that will be 
taken up also next Spring. 

The year has been one of growth and 
progress, and the whole outlook for the 
coming season is satisfactory and en- 
couraging. Prices are unchanged through- 
out. We quote : 

Barbed wire, ioo lb $315 

Plain galvanized 6 to 8 3 39 

9 2 50 

Plain galvanized 10 3 5° 

12 3 10 

13 3 2 ° 

14 3 9° 

IS 4 45 

16 4 60 

Barbed wire, 100 lb 3 25 

Plain twist 3 25 

Staples 3 65 

Oiled annealed wire 10 3 42 

" 3 48 

12 3 56 

13 3 66 

14 3 76 

IS 3 91 

Annealed wires (unoiled) 10c. less. 
Horsenails,40 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 $4 75 

No. 2 and larger 4 45 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 60 

No. 2 and larger 4 45 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 4 45 

No, 2 and larger 4 20 



Cut Nails— 

2d 1 in $4 10 

3d Fin. ij-i in. . 4 10 

3d i% in..- 3 75 

4d 1 % in 3 50 

5d lU in 3 50 

6d 2 in ... . .... 3 40 

8d q.% in 3 25 

iod 3 in 3 20 

2od 4 in 3 15 

3od 4% in 3 10 

4od 5 in 3 10 

Sod SK in 3 10 

6od 6 in 3 10 

Bar iron, $2.60 basis. 
Swedish iron, $4.75 basis. 



Wire Nails — 

1 in 4 25 

1 Y% in 4 20 



1% 
iH 
2 

2K 

3 

3^ 

4 

4tf 

S 

5* 

6 



3 80 
3 60 
3 60 
3 5° 
3 35 
3 3° 
3 25 
3 20 
3 20 
3 20 
3 20 
3 20 



Eastlake Steel Shingles 
I 



The popular choice. 

Because they can be so quickly and easily laid 
— are lightning proof— prevent fire— and are 
the most economically durable shingles made. 

Either Galvanized or Painted. 
In demand in all parts of Canada. 



f 



' 



I 



The Metallic Roofing Co., Limited 

TORONTO MONTREAL WINNIPEG 



Sleigh shoe steel ....,,.,., 2 85 

Spring steel 323 

Machinery steel 350 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, ioolb 8 50 

Jessop 13 00 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 16 gauge, 100 lb. 3 50 

18 to 22 gauge 3 75 

24 gauge 3 90 

26 gauge 4 00 

28 gauge 4 10 

Galvanized Iron, Apollo, 16 gauge 4 00 

18 and 20 gauge 4 00 

22 and 24 gauge 4 25 

26gauge 4 25 

28gauge 4 50 

30 gauge or 10M oz 4 75 

Extra sheets, 36 in. wide an advance 
of 2s p.c. per 100 lb. 

Queen's Head, 24 gauge 4 25 

26 gauge 4 50 

28 " 4 75 

Extra sheets, 36-in. wide, an advance 
of 25 p.c. per 100 lb. 

Genuine Russian, per lb 11 

Imitation " " 07 to 08 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 8 00 

26 gauge 8 50 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box .... 10 00 

IX 12 00 

IXX " 1400 

Ingot tin 35 

Canada plate, 18 x 21, 18 x 24 and 20 x 28. 3 25 

Canada plate, full polished 4 00 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 50 

Broken lots 8 00 

Pig lead. 100 lb 550 

Black iron pipe, % inch 3 30 

H " 3 3° 

H ' 3 40 

K " 3 70 

Black iron pipe, & inch 4 35 

" 1 " 6 25 

itf " 870 

" 1% " 10 50 

2 " 1450 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger, basis 11 75 

Manila, 7-16 and larger, basis 15 25 

Lathyarn 11 25 

Solde- 20 

Axes, chopping 5 6 75 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Bluestone 5 70 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 85 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 8op.c. 

Flat " brass 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 70 and iop.c. 

Coach 65 p.c. 

35 



Bolts, carriage 50 p.c. 

Machine 50 and 5 p.c. 

Tire 60 and 5 p.c. 

Bolts, Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 50 p.c. 

Flat head stove 60 and 5 p.c. 

Round head 60 and 5 p.c. 

Elevator 60 p.c. 

Rivets, iron 50 and 10 p.c. 



Copper, No. 8. 
" No. 12 



Coil chain, 3-16 inch 

K inch 

5-16 inch . . . 

% inch 

7-16 inch . . . 
H to K inch . 



1 90 

1 60 

2 30 

1 60 



32 

36 

10M 

8}i 

5H 

5% 

5 * 

4H 

Spades and shovels , . ...40 and 5 p.c. 

Harvest tools 60 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s.g. hickory, doz. . $3 15 

No. 1 

No. 2 

Octagon extra 

No.i 

Files common 70 and 10 p. c. 

Diamond 60 p.c " 

Building paper : 

Anchor, plain 65c. 

" tarred 70c. 

Pure fibre, plain 65c. 

" " tarred 80c. 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

" military is p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5p.c 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge black 15 00 

chilled, 12 gauge 16 So 

soft, 10 gauge 19 s 

chilled, 10 gauge 21 s 

Shot/Ordinary , per 100 lb 6 20 

Chilled : 6 60 

Powder, F.F., keg 475 

F.F.G 5 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 70 and 10 p.c. 

" plain 75 and 2K p.c. 

" pieced 

Japanned ware 37K p.c. 

Enamelled ware, white 45 p.c. 

" Famous 50 and 10 p.c. 

" Imperial 50 and 10 p.c. 

Green Wire Cloth 1 50 



Hard-ware and 
Metal 



THE MARKETS 



PETROLEUM. 

Water white American 27 %c 

Prime white American 25 &c. 

Water white Canadian 25KC. 

Prime white Canadian 24KC 

SCRAP. 

No. 1 cast iron $14 to 15 

No. 2 " 7 

Wrought iron scrap 5 

Copper (heavy) %%c. per lb. 

Yellow brass (heavy) 7J4c. " 

Light brass 5c. to 6c. " 

Lead pipe, or tea lead 2c. to 2}4c. 

Zinc scrap ic. " 

PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 

Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ o 90 

Less than barrel lots o 95 

Linseed oil, raw o 57 

Boiled o 60 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor o 28% 

Eldorado engine o 27K 

Atlantic red o 33 J4 

Renown engine o 42 

Black oil 19 M to .1% 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 to 74 

Harness oil o 56 

Neatsfoot oil 1 00 

Steam refined oil o 85 

Sperm oil 2 00 

Pure castor oil, first pressure o 10 

Lubricating oil o 10 



BUSINESS CONDITIONS IN BRIT- 
ISH COLUMBIA. 

Vancouver, B.C.. Dec. 31, L903. 
'■'l.'VHE year just closing is one which 
lias witnessed great advancement 
in this province. There is much to 
look back upon with regret in the way 
of lost opportunities, but, on the whole, 
there has been progress of substantial 
character. The year was marked per- 
haps by the most insistent series of labor 
troubles which ever marked its history. 
The U.B.R.E. strike of employes on the 
C.P.R. began in February, and it affected 
other unions to such an extent that the 
ordinary business of Vancouver and Vic- 
toria as well as much interior traffic was 
seriously hampered. The strikes in the 
various building trades followed in suc- 
ression. and even the fishermen were at 
one time on the verge of a strike, had. 
in fact, decided on a course which would 
have amounted to a strike, but which 
was happily averted. The printers em- 
ployed in the newspaper offices in Van- 
couver submitted a new schedule to their 
employers which was to have the effect 
of an ultimatum taking effect on October 
I. The publishers left the matter to the 
last minute and then asked for an arbi- 
tration, to which the men agreed, stipu- 
lating that the finding of the arbitration 
shall in no case reduce the scale then in 
force, and any finding to be retro-active, 
taking effect on October- I. The decision 
was reached after the first of December, 
and il in effect gave the printers their 
demands, or nearly so. 
« « * 

Despite labor disturbances, the general 
hade in mercantile lines in this province 
this year has been splendid. The business 
with the north has grown in volume, abd 
the wholesale trade of the coast cities is 
holding more of i! in proportion than in 
the past. 

Local trade, especially in building hard 
Ware and lumber, is evidenced by the 
proud record of Vancouver City, in which 
Rl, 350. 000 wortli of building permits were 
issued during the year. The lumber 
trade with the Northwest in the season 



was very good, the number of cars short 
in the early pari of the year being a 
drawback, but, on the whole, a big 
year's trade was done. 

In manufacturing- lines there- has been 
a noticeable expansion of trade. There 
tire more firms now engaged in machine 
shops and foundries than ever before in 
the history of the Coast, yet each is do- 
ing a bigger trade than ever. The 
amouot of larger work in ship repairing 
and building which has been undertaken 
in part accounts for the increase. 

Mining in the interior has shown a 
very satisfactory condition on the whole. 
The figures from the Rossland camp 
alone show that the mines of the Koote- 
nays have continued to add to the total 
wealth of the country. The gross ton- 
nage of ore output is given as 377,134 
tons for the year 1903, and the value is 
placed at $4,631,280. The increase in 
tonnage over last year is roughly esti- 
mated at 50,000 tons. During the ten 
years of the camp's history 1,687,786 
tons of ore. valued at $26. 816. 342, have 
been produced. A notable feature of 
progress in Rossland camp was the suc- 
cess of the concentration process installed 
during- the year. 

Other Kootcnay camps, such as Nelson 
and the Boundary district show equally 
good results from the operations of 1903, 
accurate figures of which, however, are 
not yet to hand. In every way it can 
be said the mining interests of British 
Columbia have shown marked advance. 
* » » 

One of the most important develop- 
ments of the year is found in the build- 
ing- of a second railway into Vancouver. 
The last day of 1903 witnessed the run- 
ning of the first train over the line from 
New Westminster right into the city of 
Vancouver. The first section of the V. 
W. & Y. Railway is thus complete. By 
it will be furnished direct connnection. 
as soon as the traffic bridge across the 
Fraser river at New Westminster is ready 
for trains to cross, with the railway 
systems of the south, and. by them, 
with Fastern Canada and the United 
States. The same people who have been 
active in carrying- out this construction, 
have also, during the year, built a line 
from Port G-uichon, at open tidewater on 
the Fraser river, to Cloverdale. connect- 
ing with the line of the Great Northern 
running in from the Stale of Washington 
and at Dresent terminating on the south 
bank of the Fraser river opposite New 
Westminster. 

The section of the V. W. & Y. Railway, 
first mentioned, will, when the bridge is 
finished, connect with this portion of the 
Great Northern system direct. In addi- 
tion to this the same people have now on 
the ground steel sufficient for 30 miles of 
rails, and the building of a line from 
Cloverdale to Huntingdon on the inter- 
national boundary is to go ahead early 
in the present season. The engineers are 
finally locating the line at the present 
moment. This line to Huntingdon will 
give direct connection with the N.P.R' 
and with the B. B. & B. C. railways, 
and will in all probability form the first 
section of the V. V. & F.. the famous 
line lone- prpmised as a direct means of 
transportation and communication be 
tvveen the coast and the Kootenaj dis 
diet. It will be under the V. V.' ,V E. 
charter and name thai the Cloverdale 

Huntingdon section will be built. 



These extensive operations which have 
been carried on in 1903, have involved 
the expenditure in purchases and con- 
struction of a round million of dollars, 
all of which has been spent in the coast 
district. In the coming year the expecta 
tion is that the same company will ex- 
pend a large amount in further exten- 
sions. It is an open secret that all the 
lines being- built (each of which has a 
separate charter) are tributary to the 
Great Northern Railway system of J. J. 
Hill, which in its self is a source of sat- 
isfaction, for that great Canadian rail- 
wayman is not in the habit of under- 
taking railway projects and putting 
money into them without making them 
complete and successful. 

The greatest portion of the projects 
now in hand is the continuance of the 
V. W. & Y. north from this city through 
the wealthy and undeveloped interior of 
British Columbia and on to Dawson, 
forming an "All Canadian" route. The 
general proposition has had much favor 
able comment. though the Provincial 
Government has not as yet favored the 
promoting company with a promise of 
assistance. 

Tn addition to opening out the interior 
of the northern portion of British Colum 
bia. the projected line would make il 
tributary to the cities of the coast, and 
when the new Canadian transcontinental 
line, the Grand Trunk Pacific, is built 
through, the V. W. & Y. would form a 
connecting link by which ready communi- 
cation could be had with the section tra- 
versed bv the G. T. Pacific. 



The talk of oil deposits in this section 
of the coast district has been roused up 
once more by the instructions recently 
issued bv a local firm of solicitors to 
form a development company, which is to 
take over the claims held by Fmil Gucn- 
ther in North Vancouver, across the har- 
bor from this city. Two New York capi 
talists arc to be on the board of direc- 
tors, and the company, which is to be 
limited liability, will put no shares on 
the market. The capital is furnished for 
all prospecting, and thorough tests are 
to be made. Last Spring a represents 
tive of the Rockefeller interests spent 
some time here looking into the proposi 
tion. and he received samples of surface 
collections of oil from the locations^ in 
question. These were analysed and gave 
satisfactory results, so that the present 
movement may be an outcome of the 
\isit of inspection. The local principals 
are very reticent in discussing the propo 
sition. They claim to have o-ood author- 
ity for the anticipation of a find of pay 
ing petroleum. 

It is interesting to note that in Steves 
(on. on the north bank of the Fraser 
river, a company have been operating for 
some time, boring for gas and oil. The 
finding of a vein of natural gas occurred 
a lone time ago, and the gas lias been 
burned since that time, though no com- 
mercial or economic use has been made 
of it. The company now exploiting the 
prospect expects to put it on a business 
basis, and the expectation is that oil 
will also be obtained. With these two 

prospects in close proximity t<> Vancou 

ver , one on the north and one on the 
south, success in either would be a great 
boom to the city, 



36 



TRADE CONDITIONS IN NOVA 
SCOTIA. 

Halifax, Jan. 5, L904. 

SO far as sales are concerned business 
is about at a standstill. Wholesale 
linns are stocktaking and getting 
matters in shape generally for the Spring 
campaign. The province was visited by 
severe weather for the greater part of 
the week, the thermometer on one or two 
occasions registering eight to ten below 
zero, vvhicb is quite unusual in this city. 
On Sunday a regular old-fashioned snow- 
storm railed -the worst for 20 years — and 
at the present writing, both city and 
country arc snowed up and business sus- 
pended. The storm was so severe that 
the trans-Atlantic steamers due to sail 
on Sunday did not leave port until the 
follow ing day. * 

* * * 

Hitherto all the wholesale hardware: 
firms in this city Lave also conducted 
retail departments in connection with 
their business. Commencing with the first 
■■A tic \ car two cf thy leading firms will 
abandon the retail branch and devote 
their entire attention to the wholesale 
business. The linns are William Robert- 
son & Son and W, 15. Arthur & Co. In 
making the announcement of the change 
the former state that the wholesale busi- 
ness has so increased of late years that 
this chance was rendered necessary, and 
that in the future the firm will devote 
their entire energies to a strictly jobbing 
trade. W. B. Arthur & Co., on account 
of the growth of the wholesale branch, 
announce that they have cut out the 
retail department and will devote their 
attention solely to their wholesale cus- 
tomers. The firm, however, will still 
conduct their bicycle department on Bed- 
ford Row and will devote more attention 
than before to the sale of Singer sewing 
machines and Bauni safes in a jobbing 
way. Tlie now building erected for A. M . 
Bell & Co. on Granville street is a mat; 
nificent structure and is a decided addi- 
tion to the appearance of our wholesale 
district. It is not yet ready for occupa- 
tion, but will be taken possession of by 
the firm during the present month. 
* * # 

Graham Fraser assumed the active 
management of the works of The Domin- 
ion Iron and Steel Co. at Sydney on 
Saturday, and his first act was to close 
down tin; open-hearth and blooming 
mills. Jt is expected that other depart- 
ments will also lie closed temporarily. 
No effort will be made to increase i In- 
output while the market is in its present 
condition, and all the work that will be 
done will be to fill such orders as are 
booked or may be received from time to 
time. The men were not discharged but 
have been put to work on tin- construc- 
tion of the finishing mills, etc. 

* # * 

The collector of customs at St. John 
has placed an officer in charge of five 
carloads of stoves, etc.. shipped by The 
MeClary Mfg. Co., of Ontario. To avoid 
the Winter freight rates on Canadian 
railways the company sent the goods to 
Boston and thence by water to St. .John. 
The boats being American instead of 
Canadian abrogated the bonding privi- 
lege and, it is claimed, rendered the 
goods liable to duty on reentry in Can 
ada. The matter has been referred to- 
tnv authorities at Ottawa. 



THE MARKETS 



"he Robb Engineering Co. have lately 
introduced a new type of engine which 
they call the "Robb-Armstrong Corliss," 
tin- construction of the valves being 
based on the original Corliss plan with 
a very ingenious valve gear invented by 
Mr. E. -I. Armstrong. This gear is sim 
pie in construction, having only half the 
number of parts of the original Corliss, 
and being especially adapted for high 
speed work. The Robb Engineering Co. 
have 25 of these engines now under con- 
struction, five of them being for the 
Montreal shops of the Canadian Pacific 
Railway, and two for the same company 
at Fort William. 



THE C. I. F. DECISION. 

JUDGMENT was given at noon on 
December 31st, in the e.i.f. case, 
by Justice Trenholme in favor of 
the plaintiffs, the Canada Hardware 
Company. Unfortunately up to time of 
going to press we have been unable to 
obtain a copy of the decision, but the 
following is a summary of his Honor's 
remarks in giving judgment. 

His Honor briefly recalled the cir- 
cumstances of the case which are known 
lo our readers. Mr. Gerald Lomer, 
manufacturers' agent, of Montreal, re- 
presenting Suren, Hartmann & Co., of 
London, England, made a contract of 
sale with the Canada Hardware Com- 
pany of a quantity of metallic goods, 
mostly annealed hay wire unvarnished. 
The contract was what is known as a 
e.i.f. coid ract Montreal, and the pur- 
chaser paid over a lump sum to cover the 
cost, the insurance, and the freight to 
Montreal. The contract did not bind 
the vendor lo deliver. His obligation 
was merely to insure the goods properly. 
If damage was done the purchaser could 
then look to the insurance company for 
restitution. The whole question al 
issue is: In the absence of any special 
instructons whal kind of insurance was 
the vendor hound to effect? Plainly 
this is a question of law unless there is 
a well established custom to override 
the law. This custom might either be a 
custom generally recognized by the trade 
or a custom established between the 
parties by previous contracts. 

The insurance effected in lliis case 
was that known as f.p.a. This insur- 
ance provides only against total loss as 
no damages are paid unless the injury 
is incurred by the stranding, sinking, 
burning or collision id' the ship. The 
cost of tliis insurance was shown to be 
one-third the cost of complete insur- 
ance against both total and partial loss. 
Jn the case in question the goods were 
injured by nisi and as (he loss was only 



H»rdwurc kdcs 
Mc-,,1 



partial the insurance' com]. any were not 
liable. 

The evidence adduced tailed to show 
any general usage among the trad.- qo! 
lo insure such goods against all the 
perils of the sea. Neither had any usage 

been established by previous dealings 

between the parties. There had been 
no previous loss and I he goods in the 
earlier contracts had been of a different 
nature upon which f.p.a. insurance 
might have been satisfactory. The pur- 
chaser did not know or acquiesce. 
Therefore (he whole question was. 
" What was the law "? 

By operation of law all the ordinary 
perils of the sea whether resulting in 
partial or total loss are covered by in- 
surance. It would he a strange thing- 
not to protect against the most usual 
kind of less. Partial loss is more fre- 
quent than total loss. The plaintiff was 
entitled to full insurance by the terms 
of his contract. It would he hard to 
find a case more exactly in point thai 
thai quoted by counsel for the plain- 
tiff. 

His Honor then discussed the amount 
of the damages to he paid. Judgment 
was given without question for two 
items, hut Suren. Hartmann & Co. will 
be held responsible for the third item 
only in case the party to whom the Can- 
ada Hradware Company sold part of the 
shipment and received payment before 
arrival of goods in Montreal make good 
their claim for damages. There was 
evidently some doubt as to their techni- 
cal right to claim damages at this late 
date. This item is dismissed unless the 
purchaser has legal recourse against the 
plaintiffs in this action, in which case 
the defendants will he held responsible. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

ilr. Walter Crose, manufacturers' agent, 
of Montreal, is in Hamilton this week 
consulting with his principals. 

Mr. F. O. Lewis, of Lewis Bros. & ( ,,.. 
Montreal, was in Toronto early in the 
week attending a meeting of the Execu- 
tive of the Canadian Wholesale Hardware 
A SSOcial ion. 

Mr. .1. U. Terrill, one of the most ener- 
getic and popular of the "knights of the 
grip" in the service of Gaverhill, Lear 
monl & Co.. of Montreal, ha- been given 
leave of absence owing to ill health. He 
is taking a rest in the Laurentians. 
"Hardware and Metal" wishes him a 
speedy return to his accustomed health. 



37 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



MONEY TIGHTNESS IN CANADA. 

By D. M. Stewart. 

THE year just closed has been, with- 
out exception, the most prosperous 
the banks of Canada have ever 
had, and that should certainly mean 
Canada has had the most prosperous 
year in its history. Existing conditions 
indicate that the present marked pros- 
perity should continue throughout 1904. 

Some idea of the good business done 
by the banks may be gathered from the 
fact that the assets of all banks have -in- 
creased from 3625,000,000 at the end of 
1902, to §660,000,000 at the present time, 
an increase of $35,000,000. The most 
noticeable change in the business done 
during the year was the largely fncreased 
amount that the banks of the Dominion 
have placed out on commercial loans. 

From 3324,000.000 at the end of 1902, 
these loans have increased to 3382.000,000, 
making an increase of 358,000,000 for the 
year, which means an increase of nearly 
35,000 a month. — 

Then, again, the bank note circulation 
has reached a new high level, at 370,- 
480,000. 

While money, as has been claimed, is 
fairly tight at the present time, the rea- 
sons for it indicate that the condition 
will last but a short time longer. 

The three principal reasons are as fol- 
lows : 

The lateness in the crop movement ; 
the quietness that has recently prevailed 
in the cheese market in England, which 
has resulted in there being at present 
between three and five million dollars 
worth of cheese in the city, and the fact 
that a number of capitalists purchased 
stocks at higher prices than are prevail- 
ing at present, and are waiting till higher 
prices can be secured. 

A month or two should see an improve- 
ment in the cheese market in England, 
and the stock market here, and this 
should tend to make money much easier 
than it is at present. 



EXPRESSED THEIR GOOD WILL. 

ON New Year's eve the travelling 
staff of Lewis Bros. & Co., Mont- 
treal and Toronto, presented 
Job W. Taylor and Theodore Korb with 
gold watch charms, containing inscrip- 
tions commemorative ' of the event, 
which marked the resignation of Messrs. 
Taylor and Korb from the staff of Lewis 
Bros. & Co. Complimentary addresses 
were also read. 

Mr. Taylor, who for many years re- 
presented Lewis Bros. & Co., has ac- 
cepted the Canadian agency of the 
Pittsburg Steel Co., with headquarters 
in Montreal. 

Mr. Korb, who joined the Lewis Bros, 
staff to compile the thousand-page cata- 



logue recently issued by that firm, leaves 
to manage the advertising bureau of the 
Belknap Hardware and Manufacturing 
Co., Louisville, 0. Many of the trade 
will unite with the staff of Lewis Bros. 
& Co. in extending good wishes to 
Messrs. Taylor and Korb. 

RETAILERS OF THE FUTURE. 

LEAVING out of the question the 
effect on the man now in the trade, 
it must be conceded that the 
changes constantly going on in retail- 
ing mean better merchants, says an ex- 
change. Necessity is the mother of in- 
vention. The smaller the margin the 
greater the necessity of inventing meth- 
ods which save and make money.- Even 
the ordinary student of trade conditions 
can see that the future has in store de- 
velopments which are to greatly change 
the conditions of retailing and the char- 
acter of the retailer. The centraliza- 
tion of the manufacturing industries of 
the country is going steadily forward, 
and the methods of marketing the goods 
means far less profit to the retailer than 
under the old plan. Under the old 
methods some merchants made money, 
others did not, and a large number fail- 
ed. It depends upon the man mostly. 
It depends upon his resources sometimes. 
Under the old method a sleepy mer- 
chant, twenty years ago, frequently made 
a fortune. The future will have no such 
opportunity for sleepy merchants. But 
there will be plenty of opportunity for 
the right man. To go further than this 
the future will develop the right men. 
The young man of energy and ideas need 
not hesitate when opportunity beckons 
him toward the store. His will not be 
known as the golden age of retailing, 
but it will be known as the age of ideas. 
— Iron and Machinery World. 

TOO MUCH STOCK. 

Surplus stock is the merchant's curse. 

His ideas of a surplus are too often 
far beyond him. 

Daily urged to buy enough goods to 
supply his trade he makes doubly sure 
by buying twice as much as he needs. 

He waits until the annual inventory 
to find what he has on hand. 

There is a time which taken at its 
flood sweeps some of these mistakes out 
of the way. 

That time is now. 

People are buying. How are you 
meeting the opportunity ? 

Can you see the other end of the story 
or are you wading in the mire of too 
much stock and no turn in the road? 

What departments of your business 
are carrying too big a load? 

Never looked it up, eh? 

Now frame a new resolution and hang 
it over your desk: 
• Be it resoluved that you will imme- 
diately investigate and keep on investi- 



gating. That you will not rest till the 
decks are properly cleared for action. 

The trouble with hundreds of mer- 
chants is they are too much working 
men and too little on the thinking or- 
der. 

If they would put in half the time on 
clean cut thought about their business, 
they could well afford to pay some man 
to do part of the work they are doing. 

Buy and sell is not the whole story. 
Neither is collecting the subject of the 
last chapter. 

Loss on goods carried over, loss of 
discounts, loss in interest paid are im- 
portant items. 

Are you guarding against those losses 
right now?— The Hardware Trade. 



AUTOS FOR TRAVELLERS. 

Editor ' ' Hardware and Metal ' ' : 

Who will be the first business man to 
bring automobiles into use by travellers 
visiting the smaller towns, especially 
where railway service is lacking or en- 
tirely inadequate or neglectful, where 
tme-tables are arranged to suit the 
manager's convenience, not that of the 
public? 

This may still be premature, but it is 
bound to come. Travellers will condense 
their samples and make about three 
towns a day where now they make but 
one on some of the railways. They will 
not need to wait for trains or livery 
rigs but can move on as soon as they 
are through in a town. The machines 
would pay for themselves in a short 
time out of what it now costs to feed 
and stable a team, to say nothing of 
the livery bills and railway fares to be 
saved. There is no reason why these 
machines cannot be perfected to over- 
come a lot of the difficulties experienced 
in the early stages of manufacturing, 
which made the automobile a doubtful 
proposition for the road. There is now 
no question as to its practical utility 
for the purpose. 

Y. Z. L. 
Toronto, December 24, 1903. 



SOLD THEIR PADLOCK BUSINESS. 

Win, Wilcox Mfg. Co., of Jliddletown. 
Conn., have sold their entire padlock and 
French rim dead lock business, including 
tools, balance of stock, good will, etc.. 
to S. 11. Slaymaker, manufacturer of 
padlocks, night latches and hardware 
specialties, Lancaster, Pa., for whom 
John H. Graham & Co., 113 Chambers 
street, New York, with offices at San 
Francisco, Cal., London, England, and 
Copenhagen. Denmark, arc general sales 
agents. 



GLASS FIRM ^NLARGING. 

The Toronto Plate Class Importing Co., 
135-143 Victoria street, Toronto, have 
put another stony to their present three- 
storey building. Latterly they have not 
been able to carry a large enough stock 
to supply the ever-increasing demand. 
They will now have about 35,000 square 
feet of flooring and will be able to give 
their customers better satisfaction than 
ever before. 



38 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



Hardware ano 
Metal 



Now for 1904 ! 

We are ready with a more complete and larger plant than ever. Everything points 
to 1904 being the greatest in the history of our business. We know we will make 
and sell more 

Imperial Oxford Ranges 

and 

Oxford Hot Water Heaters 

than in any previous year. This will be because more people will know of them and 
to know of them is to want them. Don't you want to be with us in our greatest 
year ? Write us about it. 

The Gurney Foundry Company, Limited. 

Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver 

THe Gurney-Massey Company, Limited, 

Montreal. 



ESTABLISHED I860. 



INCORPORATED 1895. 



DAVIDSON'S 



MILK CAN TRIMMINGS 
FOR 1904. 



(See how the Outer Rim and Inner are roller! in.) 





SECTION OF BOTTOM. 



BROAD HOOP PATTERN. 



This demonstrates the popularity of 

Davidson's 
Patent Milk Can Bottoms 

You should buy our Milk Cans and Trimmings, 
because : our Broad Hoop Bottom has all the advantages 
of a seamless bottom without the strain that spinning 
entails. The rim is turned in with edge of bottom, 
giving double durability and heavy rolled edges that will not tear factory floors nor waggons. 

They have no air spaces (which make soldering difficult) but sufficient space is left between bottom 
proper and rim to allow body of can to be inserted }{ of an inch, making permanent joint. 

Bottoms are thus sweated in with half the solder. 

Bottoms are concave, draining to the centre, therefore are easier to wash out. 

They will not corrode like those which drain to the side. They have flush side handles. 

Top bands are " Shouldered " and have cut out at joint, making neater and cleaner job in half 
time than with old style hoop. 

Bottoms are rivetted to bottom hoop, as well as being rolled together. 

All bands have retinned edges. 

For durability, finish and economy in making up, our Trimmings are unequalled. 



The THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL 



39 



Hnrd-ware and 



STOVES AND TINWARG 



UNDER THE WIND- 
ING UP ACT. 



Important Sale by Tender of Real Estate, Plant, 
Machinery and Supplies of the NORTHROP 
IRON WORKS, Valleyfield, Insolvent Company. 



Under authority granted by the Court, the liqui- 
dator of the above estate asks for tenders at a rate 
on the dollar on the inventoried value of the fol- 
lowing property : 

(1)— Plant, machinery, tools, jigs, patterns, sup- 
plies, work in process, inventoried at $61,070.47. 

(2) — Real estate described as follows : " A tract 
of land in the Town of Salaberry de Valley- 
field, forming part of the lot known on the Official 
Plan and Book of Reference of the Parish of Ste. 
Cecile as number ninety, containing eighty-four 
thousand feet in superfices, more or less, and 
bounded as follows, starting from a point on the 
south fence of the Canada Atlantic Railway Com- 
pany's right of way, which point is in direct con- 
tinuation of the east side of Maden street, as 
shown on said Official Plan, if the said east side 
street be continued tnrth, so as to intersect the 
Canada Atlantic Railway Company's right of 
way, as it is also shown on said Official 
Plan, from this said point two hundred and fifty 
feet, south on the said lin^ being a continuation of 
the east side of Maden Street, thence four hundred 
and twenty feet east on a line para lei to a street 
called The Avenue, and thence one hundred and 
fifty feet north, this line being parallel with the 
line first drawn as aforesaid, making a strip of land 
bounded on the north by the Canada Atlantic 
Railway right of way, in which line it measured 
four hundred and forty feet west, south and east by 
the lines just described, withall the buildings there- 
on erected." 

The plant, tools and machinery are all modern 
and of approved designs. The real estate situated 
at Valleyfield, in the Province of Quebec, offers 
the greatest possible facilities for manufacturing 
operations. 

Details of the property, together with inventories 
and all other information required, can be had at 
the office of the liquidator. Tenders will be re- 
ceived up to J50ih day of Januarv. 1904, addressed 
to the liquidator, and marked " Tenders Northrop 
Iron Works." The highest, or any tender, not 
necessarily accepted. 

STANLEY H. MCDOWELL, 
Liquidator, 
15 St. Helen St., Montreal. 





Victor Flour Sifter 

WHEN BUYING SIFTERS 

BUY THE "VICTOR" AND YOU WILL 

HAVE THE BEST. 

E. T. WRIGHT & CO., 

HAMILTON and MONTREAL. 



Sheet Zinc for Roofing. 

WILL zinc roofing become popular '? 
Is it of such value- that the suc- 
cess of the attempt to introduce 
it will be ensured ? In reply to inquiries 
made by The Xetal Worker several inter 
esting opinions have been received. 

The general manager of The M'atthies 
sen & Hegeler Zinc Co., La Salle, 111., 
writes as follows ; Zinc is extensively 
used for roofing purposes in several 
European countries, and there is no rea- 
son why it should not be used advan- 
tageously for the same purpose here, 
provided sufficient allowance is made for 
expansion and contraction of the metal 
by reason of the changes in temperature, 
which are more severe here, the South 
excepted, than in Central Europe. (n 
Europe zinc roofing is considered a spe- 
cial trade which is carried on by 
mechanics skilled in the art of working 
sheet zinc into all kinds of ornaments as 
well as roofing. At the lime the writer 
was living in Europe zinc roofs were 
guaranteed to last for 10 years without 
repairs. When zinc is used in the shape 
of tiles it is more easily applied than in 
larger sheets, and it can be laid on in 
the same way as other metallic tiles. 
Two zinc tile roofs in this vicinity are 
giving complete satisfaction. 

The Lauyon Zinc Co.. St. Louis. Mo.. 
say : We are glad that you have brought 
up the subject of zinc for roofing pur- 
poses, because it is one that is really 
entitled to consideration. The interest 
now being evinced by architects and 
builders in sheet zinc for roofing purposes 
sieiws that the experience of the Euro 
pean people during the past 25 or :'.< 
years is sufficient to insure good results 

if the subject is taken up thoughtfully b\ 
our people. So far as we can learn, tie' 
climatic differences here are such as re- 
quire more technical at lent ion to the 
method of attaching the various sections 
of the roof or ornaments, but as soon as 
these points are carefully .worked out 
there is tio doubt about the ultimate use 
of zinc for these purposes. We have been 

surprised to note the increase in the in- 
quiries and purchase of sheet zinc for 
roofing. This demand has been growing 
steadily and has reached a substantial 
quantity. Fio.wever, it is still but a frac- 
tion of the amount used yearly in 
Europe, 

W. H. Mullins. of Salem. Ohio, a well 
known manufacturer of architectural 
sheet metal work, writes: I am sorry 
that I cannot give you any practical in- 



accurate information in regard to sheet 
zinc roofing in this country. We have 
sold quite an amount of our stamped 
zinc, tile roofing, but not enough of it to 
justify the claim that it is in general 
use. Zinc, as you are probably aware, 
is largely used in Europe for roofing pur 
poses. In Germany lo per cent, of the 
total product of sheet zinc is SO used. 

There a roof is made of heavy zinc, sheets 
never lighter than NO. 12 gauge being 
used and \os. I I and Hi gauge being 
preferred. Where this heavy gauge of 
zinc is used the zinc, in oxidizing, forms 
its own coatine' and is protected from 
the action of the weather. It is claimed 
that a roof made of No. II gauge zinc 
will last for Hi or 50 years. Where zinc 
has been employed for roofing in this 
country I think the mistake has been 
made of using zinc of gauges that are 
too light for the purpose, so that when 
oxidation takes place it has not enough 
body of metal to work on and the sheet 
is very soon eaten through. We have 
furnished a number of ornamental roofs 
in zinc, notably a roof for the large office 
building of The Illinois Zinc Co. at Peru. 
111., and for the residence of Mr. Matthies 
sen. of the firm of Matthiessen & Hegeler, 

at I. a Salle, III. 1 have often thought 

that if the matter was properly exploited 
in this country a much larger quantity of 
zinc would be used for roofing purposes. 

Grand River Metal Works. 
Tlie Grand River which supplies many 
of the industrial establishments of Gait, 
Ont., with power, also supplied a grow- 
ing industry of the ti wu, the Grand River 
Metal Works, with a name. This lirm 
make specialties formerly imported. 
Among their lines are bolts, iron brack- 
ets. '' Blizzard " snow shovels, carpet 
stretchers, etc. They have already 
"• caught on "' in an excellent way. Air. 
Handct ck, treasurer id' the company, 
informed a representative of " Hard- 
waie and Metal " that timmgh their 
advertisement in Ihis paper they receiv- 
ed several big orders, so that their works 
are now kept busy supplying the market. 

'I'he Mountain \ iew Ranching Co.. 
Stratford, Out., have been incorporated 
with a capital of £50.000, to carry on the 
business of [arming, ranching and stock 
raising in all its branches. 'I'he directors 
are E. Walton. St. Albans. I'.S.A.; .1. A. 
Davidson, John Brown, and Henry Wal 
ton. all ol Stratford ; and C. K. Moore, 
of Toronto. 



40 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



Hardware aad 
Metal 



Have you 
tried it ? 

Tried what ? 





Wire-Cone 



Incan- 
descent 



Toaster 



Only perfect Bread Toaster for Gas 
or Gasoline Stoves. No smoky taste 
to bread toasted on this toaster. 

Write for prices. 

H.O.Edy, Montreal. E.T.Wright ft Co., Hamilton. 
HARKINS & WILLIS, 



Manufacturers and Invent 



ors, 



Ann Harbor, Mich. 



This is in your line of business, and it will 
pay you. 

The Batty Stove ft Hardware Co 

76 YORK ST., TORONTO. 




J. M. MAST MFG. CO.'S . 

RAT and MOUSE TRAPS 

Strongest Traps /Hade. 

Prices Exactly Right. 

CANADIAN AGENTS 

Edwin H. Grenfell & Co., London, Ont. 



Apply all the tests to 

STERNE'S ASBEST08 CEMENT 

and it will fill the bill every time. 
Whether for durability or economy, satisfaction to 
the user, or saleability, it uever falls to meet every re- 
quirement. Write for samples ad prices. 

Manufactured by G. F. STERNE, Brantford. 
For Sale by : J.H. Hanson, Montreal 

Batty Stove & Hardware Co., Toronto 




The FAIRGRIEVE GAS TOASTER 

Retails at 25c. The only Toaster guaranteed to toast on 
gas, gasoline or blue flame oil stoves without taste or smell. 
Write for prices. 

THE FAIRGRIEVE MANTG. CO.. 

295 COLLEGE ST., TORONTO. 
U. S. Branch: 289 Jefferson Ave.. DETROIT. 

Never Drip a Drop 

-*- THE NEW TEA STRAINER 




Meets a popular need. A side line you 
cannot afford to be without. Retails at 
10 cents. 

t'Ja d^t 'mperial Tea Strainer Co., 
1 LH "Ul MONTREAL. 



means perfection in 

the manufacture of 



ROME 

Nickled-Plated Copperware 

A FULL LINE ALWAYS CARRIED IN STOCK IN WINNIPEG 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE, OR BETTER STILL, SEND US A SAMPLE ORDER 

Coltart & Cameron 



8pecial attention given to 
warehousing and distributing 
cars. 



Manufacturers' Agents and Warehousemen, 

141-143 Bannatyne Avenue, WINNIPEG. 



DIAMOND STOVE PIPE DAMPER AND CLIP 




U. S. Patent June 25th, 1895. 
Canadian Pat. Dec. 13th, 1894. 

Sold by Jobbers of - - - 

HARDWARE 
TINWARE 
and STOVES, 

for furnace pipe, to support 
the sheet steel blade 



/ 



s" 



A 




Manufactured by 



THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
TAYLOR-FORBES CO., Limited, Guelph, Ontario. 

41 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEHENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a word first 
insertion; lc. a word each subsequent insertion. 

Contractions count as one word, but five flgun 
$1,000) are allowed as one word. 

Cash remittance to cover cost must accompany all 
advertisements. In no case can this rule be overlook- 
ed. Advertisements received without remittance 
cannot be acknowledged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, five 
cents must be added to cost to cover postage, el 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 



\\J AN TED— First-class tinsmith by the year. 
v * with knowledge of p'umbing work. E M 
Shildrick, Patis, Ont. 



U/AGONMAKERS, blacksmiths, machine 
" v hands ; experienced men preferred , 
steady job and good wages. Box i, Hardware 
and Metal, Toronto. (f) 



EXPERIENCED machine hand for blocking 
*— out ; also buzz planer hand, who understands 
glueing ; permanent to right man. Box 2, HARD- 
WARE AND Metal, Toronto. (f) 



SITUATIONS WANTED. 



HARDWARE CLERK and bookkeeper ; young 
man; experienced in general hardware, stoves, 
steamfitters' and plumbers' supplies, wants posi- 
tion ; Northwest preferred ; references furnished. 
Box 90, Hardware and Metal, Toronto. (4) 

BY a young man with 20 years' experience in the 
hardware business, a position of traveller or 
in the warehouse ; best of reference as to sobriety 
and ability. Address Z., 73 James street, 
Ottawa. (3) 



ARTICLES WANTED, 



ALWAYS in the market for lead and copper con- 
centrates ; advise particulars. Syracuse 
Smelting Works, Montreal. (2) 



FOR SALE. 

Sale of stock of hardware and shop supplies by tender. 
The extensive and old established business of J. Hender- 
son in Town of Collingwood. Owner retiring. 

Collingwood is one of the most flourishing and progressive 
Towns in Canada and has brightest outlook for the future. It 
has largest and most up-to-date dry dock and shipbuiling 
plant on the Upper Lakes where largest vessels are built and 
repaired. It has also large saw mills, export meat-pa 
plant, flour mill, grain elevator, planing mills, tannery. 
foundry, etc., which give employment to a large number 
of hands. It has also near completion large steel manu- 
facturing plant and rolling mills, wire mills, nail factory and 
furniture factor}'. It is headqarters of large line of steam- 
boats which give it connection with all points on the lakes. 
Harbor is now crowded with steamboats which will tit out 
there in Spring. It is a terminal of Grand Trunk Railway 
and also an objective point of railways now under construc- 
tion and projected. Written tenders for above stock will be 
received up to the 15th day of January, 1904 by the under- 
signed, from whom conditions and terms of tender and other 
nformation can be obtained on application, 
uilding for sale J. HENDERSON, 

or rent. Hardware Merchant, Collingwood. 



MONEY -MAKING. 

I can assist the retail hardware 
dealer to make a nice monthly pro- 
fit. My business is electro-plating. 

The retailer gets me the work of 
his town. 

Write me for particulars. 

D.SUTHERLAND 

Electro-Plater. 
112 Church Street, - TORONTO 



Hardware and 
Metal 




A New Method of Making Art Glass. 

A LONDON manufacturer of art 
glass proposes to establish a fac- 
tory at Annua. 111. He describes 
tlie process as follows: The figures or 
designs are first made, then are placed 
between two pieces of plate glass. A 
high-class artist is employed. He is 
given the idea of the design wanted and 
then traces the same on apiece of trans- 
parent paper. This paper is laid upon 
a piece of plate glass the desired size. 
The tracings are then followed by a 
flexible brass rule, which is placed on 
the outlines traced. After the brass 
strips have been put into place, small 
heads the size of a pin head and crush 1 
ed glass of the desired shade are placed 
inside of the brass strips. After all of 
the beads and plate glass have been put 
into position the entire design is cover- 
ed with what is known as a water glass, 
which acts the same as glue. The de- 
sign is then covered over with another 
plate glass and firmly secured and is 
ready for the market. 

It is claimed for the work that it will 
out-last the art glass, made in this 
country, and according to the designs 
displayed the work is far more artistic 
than that seen in churches and other 
1 daces where art glass is made. The 
manufacturers claim for their product, 
that it can be manufactured for just 
hall' of the cost of art glass and thus 
far in England the new work is being 
used extensively in all of the modern 
buildings and churches. — Review. 

The 1904 Linseed Oil Outlook. 

IN July and August of 1901 raw lin- 
seed oil in carload lots sold at Chi- 
cago at 80 cents per gallon. Since 
thai time the tendency of the market 
has been generally downward, until the 
Chicago quotation is now 33 cents. This 
is the lowest December quotation for oil 
since December, 1896, when the marked 
touched bottom at Ti cents. In the two 
following years the lowest December 
quotation was 35 cents, but in the four 
years since that time, 1899-1902 inclu- 
sive, the (dose of each year has seen 
much higher prices for "il. ranging from 
i;; t,, 58 cents. 



The usual tendency of the linseed oil 
market, following the first of each cal- 
endar year, has been to advance. The 
year 1903 was an exception, the Janu- 
ary price being 44 cents, while subse- 
quent months developed lower prices. 
But in 1902 the year opened at 55 
cents and went to 64 cents in July; in 
1901 January opened at 53 cents and 
there was a steady advance to SO cents 
in July; in 1900 the opening was at 
51 cents and the July price 05 cents. 
Some of the years previous to 1900 show 
a weakening market from January to 
July, but in the majority of instances 
there has been an advance or a firm 
market during the first six months of the 
calendar year. Lower prices usually 
have come after the appearance of the 

Taking the average of past years in 
respect to the course id' prices, and 
considering all other circumstances, it 
appears probable that linseed oil will 
no! sell much lower, if any, after Janu- 
ary 1st than it is now selling. True, 
there is a large amount of flaxseed in 
public and private store, but it is held, 
for the most part, in strong bands. 
Much of it is owned by crushers and 
they are in no mood to sell their oil at 
prices below real value as predicted on 
the cost of their seed. Besides, they 
anticipate a brisk demand for oil after 
January 1st, due to the fact that only a 
small amount of oil as compared with 
past years has been placed under con- 
tract. While we do not wish to be un- 
derstood as predicting higher prices for 
oil for the first half of 1904, we think 
the situation is favorable to firm or ad- 
vancing markets.— Paint, Oil and Drug 
Review. 



Paint and Oil Markets. 

MONTREAL. 

Trade this week is considered "fair 
for the season of the year and the gen- 
eral outlook is promising. Linseed oil 
and turpentine have been slightly ad- 
vanced. Other prices are unchanged. 
We quote: 

Ground White Lead-Best brands, Gov- 
ernment standard, $4.60 to $4.75; No. 1, 
$4.25 to $4.40: No. 2, $4 to $4.10; No. 
3, $3,671-2 to $3,771-2; No. 4, $3.30 to 



$3.40, all f.ob. Montreal. Terms, four 
months, or 3 per cent, off for cash in ,'iO 
days. 

Dry White Lead.— $4.25 in casks, and 
in kegs $4.50. 

Dry White Zinc— Pure dry, in casks. 
6 l-4c. ; in 100-lb. kegs, 6 3-4e. ; No. 1, 
zinc, in casks, 5 l-4c. ; in 100-lb kegs, 
5 3-4c. 

White Zinc (ground in oil)— Pure, 25- 
lb. irons, 8c; No. 1, 7c; No. 2, 6c 

Putty.— We quote: Bulk, in barrels, 
$1.50: in 25-lb. tins and irons, $1.85; 
bladded putty in barrels, $1.75. 

Orange Mineral.— Casks, 7c; 100-lb. 
kegs, 71-4c; smaller quantities, 8 l-4c 

Red Leads. — Genuine red lead, in 
casks, $4.25; in .100-lb. kegs, $4.50; in 
less quantities, $5.50 per 100 lb. No. 1 
red lead, casks $3; kegs, $4.25, and smal- 
ler quantities, $5.25. 

Litharge. — Ground, casks, 5c; in less 
quantities, 5 l-2c : flake litharge, casks, 
$5 ; smalls, $5.50 per 100 lb. 

Linseed Oil— Raw, 1 to 4 barrels. 47c: 
5 to 9 barrels, 46c; boiled. 1 to 4 bar- 
rels, 50c: 5 to 9 barrels, 49c. Delivered 
in Ontario between Montreal and Osha- 
wa at lie per gallon advance. 

Turpentine— Single barrels. 851-2c,; 
2 to 4 harries. 841-2.C. Standard gal- 
lon of 8.6 pounds. 

Benzine.— 25 to 26c 

Shellac Varnish.— Pure white. $2.60. 
to $2.80"; pure orange, $2.60 to $2.80; 
No. 1 orange shellac, $2.40 to $2.60. 

Mixed Paints.— $1.20 to $1.40 per pal- 
Ion. 

GABRIEL & SCHALL, 

205 Pearl St., NEW YORK. 

IMPORTERS 

LITHOPONE, Oxide of Zinc, 

BARYTES (Crude and Powdered), 

SULPHATE OF BARYTES ,;;,; 
CARBONATE OF BARYTES 

(Precipitated) 
BLANC FIXE (DRT and Ptop). 

DRY COLORS, 

DRIERS, <"' PAINT INB VAKMSII 

"BRUNSWlc^AldPHAlT MASTIC 
BITUMEN 



12 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware an«3 
Metal 



NSEED 



Raw and Boiled 

"GUARANTEED PURE" 



HANlf 4CTI RID BY 



Canada Linseed Oil Mills, 

MONTREAL. 



LIMITED. 



&5r BARRELS WANTED!! 

We are open to buy good sound, oak 

Linseed Oil, Turpentine, Varnish, and 
Machine Oil Barrels. 



If You Buy 



Varnishes 
Japans 
Lacquers 
Stains 
Fillers 



Paints 
Colors 
Glues 
Bronzes 
Chamois 
Sponges 



WRITE. TO 



LIMITED 



R.C.JAniESON&CO. 
MONTREAL 

AGENTS FOR ASPINALLS ENAMEL. 




JANUARY— DECEMBER, 1904 



This year is fraught with many possibilities for the 
hardware dealer. It will end right or wrong, according 
to his choices. 

In the matter of Prepared Paints he must choose 
some brand, and the one to choose is that which will 
advertise him best and longest. 

STERLING PAINTS 




are by all tests the best. The paint itself says so. Write 
us and we'll tell you more about it. 

THE STERLING PAINT PEOPLE 

(GRANT-HAMILTON OIL CO., LIMITED) 

Montreal Winnipeg 



Hardware and 
Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Castor Oil.— 8 3-4 to 9 l-4c. in whole- 
sale lots, and l-2c. additional for small 
lots. 

English Paris Green.— 50 and 100 lb. 
drums, 15c. per lb.; 25 11). drums, 151-2c: 
1-11.. paper boxes, 16c; 1-lb. tin boxes, 
17c. Terms, 2 per cent. 30 days: 90 
clays net. 

TORONTO. 

There is little business and prices are 
without change throughout. In tact 
little interest is being taken in the 
market though some business For future 
delivery is noted. We quote: 

"White Lead— Ex-Toronto, pure white 
lead. $4.75; No. 1, $4.30; No. 2, $4: No. 
;;. $3.60; No. 4. $3.35 in packages of 25 
lb. and upwards; l-2c. per lb. extra will 
| )( . charged for 12^-2-lb. packages; gen- 
nine dry white lead, in casks. $4.87-1-2. 

Red Lead— Genuine, in casks of 500 
lb., $4.25 to $4.50; ditto, in kegs of 100 
11).. $4.75: No. 1, in casks of 560 lb., $4: 
ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $4.25. 

Litharge— Genuine, G to l-2c. 

White Zinc — (ienuine, French V.M., 
in casks, $6 to $6.'J5; Lehigh, in casks, 
$G to $0.25. 

Shingle Stain-In 5-gallon lots, (HI to 
85c. per gallon. 

Paris White— 90c. to $1 pee L00 lb. 

Whiting— 60 to 65c. per 100 lb.; Gild- 
ers' whiting, 75 to 80c. 

Shellac— Pure orange, in, barrels 
$2.45; while. $2.60 per gallon; No. 1, 
15c. less: in less quantities 30c, extra, 
including price of can. 

Pumice Stone— Powdered, $2.50 per 
ewt. in bhls.. and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity; lump, 16c. in snial lots and 
8c. in bbls. 

Linseed Oil— Raw, 1 to 2 bbls., 50c; 
boiled, 53c; 3 to 5 bbls., raw, 49c; boil- 
ed, 52c; 6 to !) bbls:, raw, 48c: boiled. 
51c., delivered. To Toronto, Hainitlon 
and London, 2c. less. 

Turpentine— Single bbls., 8Gc. ; 2 to 

I bbls., 85c, delivered; 5 bbls. and over, 
open. Toronto, Hamilton and London, 
'2c. less. For less quanlites than bar- 
rels. 5c. per gallon extra will lie added, 
ami for 5-gallon packages, 56c. and 10- 
gallon packages, 80c will be charged. 

Glues— Broken sheet, in 200-lb. bbls.. 
S in s L-'2c per 16.: cabinet glue, in bbls., 

II 1-2 to 12c; emery glue, in bbls., 17c; 
bookbinders', ground, 101-2c; finest 
American, while. 16c: No. 1 American 
n liite, I5c. per lb. 

Putty — Common. $1.65; pure , bladders 
in ban-els, $2.25; bladders, in 100-lb. 
ke-s. $2.40; bulk, in barrels. $2.05; bulk, 



less than barrels and up to 100 lb., $2.65. 

Plaster Paris— New Brunswick, $2 
per bbl. 

Liquid Paints— Pure, $1.20 to $1.40 
per gallon; No. ],. $1.10 per gallon. 

Barn Paints— 65 to 70c per gallon. 

Castor Oil— English, in cases, 71-2 to 
Sc. per pound, and 8 1-2 to 9c. for single 
tins. 

English Paris. Green— Petroleum 
bbls., 14 1-4c; arsenic kegs, 14 1-2c : 50 
to 100-lb. ,drums, 15c; 1-lb. packages, 
16c; 1-lb. tins. 17c; 1-2-lb. packages, 
1-2,-lb. tins, 10c 

Canadian Paris Green (present deliv- 
ery) --Petroleum bbls.. 12l-4c; arsenic 
kegs, 121-2c; 50 and 100-lb. drums, 13c; 
1-lb. packages, 14c; 1-lb. tins, 15c; 
1-2-lb. packages, 16c 

ST. JOHN 

Burning oil is always a large business 
al this season. The present prices are 
much above the average. People must 
have oil. and as there is no competition 
between American and Canadian oils, 
I hey have to pay the price. Values are 
very firm. Lubricating oils begin to 
have more attention; the market is firm. 
Paint oils also have more attention. 
Linseeds are very low. Turpentine is 
unchanged at the high price. Fish oils 
are scarce and high. 

WINDOW GLASS. 

MONTREAL. 

Prices are being fairly well main- 
tained at the present low figures. We 



again quote as follows: First break, 50 
feet, $1.70; second brake, $1.80 for 50 
feet. First break, 100 feet, $3.25; sec- 
ond break, $3.45; third break. $3.95: 
fourth break. $4.20. 



TORONTO. 

Some cutting is being done. A fair 
business is reported. We quote prices 
nominally as follows: Star, under 26 in., 
$3.16: 26 to 40 in., $3.30; 41 to 50 in., 
$3.70; 51 to 60 in., $4; 61 to 70 in.. 
$5; 71 to SO in., $4.30 net, Toronto, Ham- 
ilton ami London. 



RETAILER CHARGED WITH FRAUD 

At the instance of the creditors Ed- 
ward Basken, general storekeeper of 
Sault Ste. Marie, has been arrested on 
the charge of fraud. Basken recently 
assigned to Osier Wade of Toronto, and 
at a meeting of the inspectors it was 
decided to make an investigation into 
his methods of doing business. It was 
stated that last September Basken is- 
sued a statement showing a surplus of 
$6,000, whereas when the failure occur- 
red the liabilities were found to be 
about $30,000, with assets of only 
$7,000. Mr. A. C. McMaster, of Mac- 
donell, McMaster & Geary, represent- 
ing about 40 of the creditors, was sent 
to Sudbury, North Bay, ami tin; Son, 
Basken having had stores at the three 
points, to investigate, and the arrest 
followed. 



BEGIN THE NEW YEAR 

by stocking the best liquid paint on the market. 

"ANCHOR" LIQUID PAINT has no equal. The White 
Lead used in its manufacture is BRANDRAM'S B. B. GENUINE— the world's 
siandard . 



c*° R l*-r 




It gives satisfaction. 

It's a seller. 

Its advertising is up to date. 

It's a money maker. 



Send us a p"st card 

and let us tell you 

all about it. 






TRADE MARK 

HENDERSON & POTTS, Limited, Halifax. 
HENDERSON & POTTS CO., Limited, Montreal. 



44 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware a n<J 
Metal 



CHURCH'S COLD WATER 



ALABA5TINE 

is already half sold when a dealer puts it in stuck because of our GENEROUS ADVERTISING in public papers, It is not a kalsomine, bul a permananl coating that harden) 
with age. a claim that cannot be truthfully made of any other wall-coating. The patented feature READY FOR USE l',V MIXING IX COLD WATER is a gri al ad 



; ad- 
vantage to the busy workman. He appreciates it, and to sell anything else it must be recommended as "the same tiling, or "just as good." No dealer can afford to make 
such representation. The public knows Alabastine, and little or nothing about the just-as-goods, There is no loss in Belling AJabastine it is put up in moisture i 
ages, and in the most popular shades. 



proof pack- 



W'e shall help to sell Alabastine in the future, just as we have foi more than twenty years past. Order early either through jobber, 



ol 



THE ALABASTINE CO., Limited, PARIS, ONT. 



GENUINE 



PRftTTS ASTRAL 
LAMP OIL 

Sold in all countries and recognized as the 
highest grade oil manufactured. 

WHOLESALE ONLY. 

THE QUEEN CITY OIL COMPANY, Limited, 
TORONTO, ONT. 



Standard Paint & Varnish Works 

Limited 

Makers of High-Grade Varnishes, Japans, 
Paints, Colors and Enamels. 

WINDSOR, ONT. 



768 Craig St., 
MONTREAL 



R. E.THORNE, 

Wholesale Agent and Importer 

Dry Colors, Ochres, Bronze Powders, 
Aluminum Powder, Schlag Metal, 
Bronze Liquids and Varnishes. 

Toronto Office - 29 Melinda St. 



HARDWARE AND METAL is the only journal in Canada concerning 
itself with the paint, oil and glass interests. Its markets are trust- 
worthy and full. 



GLASS 

Our only business. 

Our service is right. 

Have you an order ? 
Five warehouses. 



The Consolidated Plate Glass Co., 

TORONTO MONTREAL LONDON 

OTTAWA WINNIPEG. 




Paints and Paints 

Some are good, some poor. If GLOBE PAINTS were 
poor they wouldn't be 9 years on the market. It takes 
a good article to live as long as that. We are not only 
living, but growing. That means a good deal. 

—When our salesman calls on you, pay good heed 
to what he has to say. 



The Globe Paint Co., 



422-424 Adelaide St. W., Toronto. 



Limited 



"Island City" Paint-Varnish Works 




Our " Island City" Enamel Paints 
are the best in the market — ij artistic shades. 

Our "Island City" Aluminum, Gold 
and Silver Paints can be us^d with 

great satisfaction on Furnaces, Radiators, all 
sorts of Furniture and Ornaments that require 
renovating. 



P. D. DODS & CO., Proprietors, Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver, 



45 



HAkbWARE AND METAL 



THE 



CANADA 
PAINT 

COMPANY 



LTD 



THE 



CANADA 
PAINT 

COMPANY 



LTD 




MINING AND SHIPPING NEWS 

HARDWARE and Metal desires to furnish its readers with 
reliable mining aDd shipping news, and would welcome 
each from any authentic source. 

A modern bankhead is to be installed 
at Sydney Mine No. 1. Sydney Mines, 
M.S. ' 

The Algoma Navigation Co. are figur- 
ing on a project to put on two new 
steamers to trade between Owen Sound, 
Mauitoulin Island and North Shore 
points. 

The steam vessel which The Calvin Co. 
are building at Garden Island, Out., is a 
paddle-wheel brig], J 3D feet keel. "20 feet 
beam and i) feet depth of hold. She is 
for raft towing and for running the St. 
Lawrence rapids. 

The Nova Scotia Steel Co. have secured 
several options on iron deposits in Cuba, 
and have sent an expert to examine them 
and report. The iron would be valuable 
for mixing with the iron ore they now 
use. 

Graham Fraser has assumed active* 
management of the works of The Domin- 
ion Iron & Steel Co. Having inspected 
every department of the plant he has 
closed down the open-hearth and bloom- 
ing mills for two weeks. No effort will 
be made to increase the output with the 
market in its present condition. 

The Northern Light, Mining and Devel- 
opment Co.. Port Arthur, Ont., have 
incorporated with a capital 



gave out tin- following statement last 
week : "Now that the coal company has 
taken over the management of their own 
affairs I might say that the chief feature 
of the policy of the company will be to 
increase the output as rapidly as possi- 
ble. Our output has now reached all but 
15,000 tons a day, while last Thursday 
out of No. 2 Dominion mine 1,900 tons 
were taken." 

John F. Stairs speaks hopefully of The 
Nova Scotia Coal & Steel Co. He says : 
"The company are now experiencing the 
most prosperous year in their history, 
and the steadily increasing output of 
coal puts the company in a better posi- 
tion to-day than it has ever been in the 
past. In addition to the old collieries 
taken over from the General Mining As 
sociation, two new collieries have been 
opened up during the past year, and the 
output from these new collieries has al- 
ready reached 200,000 tons, and they are 
not yet fully developed. The output of in- 
gots and finished steel is also consider- 
ably larger than in any previous year." 



of 



THE LIPSCOMB DISC SCREW CALK 

The Lipscomb disc screw calk, which 
was first placed on the market last year 
by The Canada Screw Co., Hamilton, has 
proved so popular that the manufacturers 
are introducing two new sizes for this 
Season's trade, and have re-numbered the 
entire set. Experience has shown where 
several important improvements could be 
made over last year's calk, and we are 



Durage. all of Duluth, U.S.A.; 
i. arson. Superior. I '.S.A. 

Political quarrels have been started in 
Montreal relative to the proposed spend 
ireg of between §2,000,000 and §3,000,000 
on steel sheds at the wharves. This is 
epiite in line with past history in Mont 
real, and will result in the lengthy post 
ponement, if not the abandonment, of 
the project for completing the improve 
nient scheme that ha.- been in progress 
for (lie past six years. — Marine Review. 

file Dominion Coal Co. will increase 
their output. President James Uoss 



irmed that the spikes are uniformly 
JUJfcd, and that the formation of the 
ISC rr»s -been so altered as to greatly 
?tren#tlaen it. The spike shape has been 
IprovecL/ind the calks can be turned in 
easiiy.^che chucks of the different tools 
are now made very hard and of better 
material than those sent out last year. 
We illustrate the different sizes of calks 
on this page. The manufacturers state 
that size No. 00 is intended mainly for an 
ice calk. No. ."> is the standard logger's 
calk for most sections. The goods are 
marketed through the jobbing trade. 



46 



Hardware and 



Window and Interior Displays 



Timely Hints 
and Suggestions. 



The Hardware Window. 

IT is a lementable fact, but never- 
theless true, thai the hardware 
merchant is the most backward 
as a class, in the attractive decor- 
ation of his windows. The dry 
goods store has for years felt its very 
existence dependent upon the interest it 
could create through the window dis- 
play; the grocer is rapidly showing 
that he has reached the conclusion that 
his window space can he used as a valu- 
able advertisement) the bookseller and 
dealer in fancy goods has been long 
aware from the very nature of his 
business that the volume of his business 
varied directly with the efforts he made 
to draw the attention of the public to 
the wares and novelties he was handl- 
ing; and the men's furnisher and millin- 
ery establishments are devoting more 
time on the arrangement of their window 
than on any other pari of their busi- 
ness. But the hardwaremen in some 
centres, seem to have become infused 
with very few of the progressive ideas 
that have so strongly influenced the 
decorative plans of the other merchants. 
Why they have remained stationery is 
not difficult to understand, but the rea- 
sonableness of such a backwardness is 
impossible to defend. The causes of it 
may be looked for in the nature of the 
goods handled, which from their unat- 
tractiveness in themselves, convey the 
impression to the merchant that they 
cannot be tastily shown, and also in the 
fact that almost everything in the hard- 
ware stock is a staple, a thing which a 
man must buy if he needs it. but will 
have no interest in as long as he does 
not actually require it. 

This slowness in grasping the idea of 
modern business methods does not, of 
course, extend to all hardware mer- 
chants, and in this article it is only 
tin se who are careless of their display 
and the number of whom is much too 
large, who are criticized. They con- 
sider that if a man wants a hammer or 
a screw or a coal scuttle or a whet- 
stone he knows he must go to the hard- 
ware store to get it, and no amount of 
display will sell any one of them to 
him unless he does need it. But the 



fact is lost sight of, that the window 
that prompts his memory, that reminds 
him of his requirements, belongs to the 
store that is going to sell him the article. 
A man in need of the most staple article 
will in many cases buy it where he sees 
it. The carefully dressed hardware 
window, whether it shows the article 
or not, will remind him of his needs, 
and the window that in no way attracts 
his attention will be passed by. 

But it is not the staples which should 
occupy the most prominent positions 
in the window, and this is one of the 
points that every window dresser should 
remember. Such things as nails, ham- 
mers, screws, chains, etc., will receive 
only small benefit from a window space, 
as everyone knows such things are car- 
ried in sufficient variety in all hardware 
stores. But this is only a small part of 
the stock, the greater part admitting of 

not only g I arrangements, but of 

profitable advertising through the win- 
dow display. Knives, skates, scissors, 
razors, guns, silverware, clocks, lamps, 
heaters of various kinds, carpenters' 
tools and a great list of other articles 
are lines which can very often be sold 
entirely from the display and will cre- 
ate a demand that may not have been 
pressingly felt by the customer. Any of 
them may be done without for months, 
but at the same time the possession of 
them may fill a want. 

Expensive But Profitable. 

"A 7"KS, no one will deny that the mer- 
X chant who arranges good window 
displays is undergoing some ex- 
pense which he who is careless of the 
appearance id' his store front does not 
encounter. The unprogressive merchant 
who offers this objection to the show- 
window considers that, as the expense 
cannot be denied, his argument (doses 
the question. 

He may believe in advertising in the 
local paper, although it is safe to say 
that if he does not eblieve in dressing 
his window he is out of accord with all 
the modern business building methods. 
But if he does advertise, the expense 
objection is discovered to be of no weight 
for advertising costs more than the aver- 



age window-dressing, and the results 
are less evident. If he Ajfesjiot adver- 
tise let ns ask him if he aWJs his nam 
and business to appear onthe fronl of 
his store. If so, why? He will say in 
order that people may see who and 
what he is. Well, if the public will 
bother to look at his name and business, 
things in which there is no active in- 
terest, it is certain that they will ob- 
serve his show window if it is well trim- 
med. And if they observe and admire 
the merchant is sure to profit, from that. 

Should any man, merchant or not, feel 
sure that, from an investment of a sum 
of money, he will reap a profit, he would 
not hesitate to make the investment. 
He has the expense of laying out the 
money at first, but he is looking forward 
to the profit, and does not begrudge the 
outlay. The merchant who will not 
dress his windows on account of the in- 
itial expense, is like the man who will 
not spend a dollar to make another, 
simply because he must part with the 
dollar first. Of course it would be very 
difficult to convince him of this, but if 
he can not see the comparison he must 
be one of the very few who think that 
nothing is sold through the window. 
The number who really think this at this 
date is so very small, that it is scarce- 
ly worth while combatting their ideas. 
They are not the successful class, nor 
do they deserve to be. 

But window dressing is not the expen- 
sive phase of storekeeping that many 
think it to be. Excellent windows can 
be dressed all the year round, at a total 
cost of only a few dollars. The elabor- 
ate fancy window of the departmental 
dry goods store is not a necessarv part 
of any plans for attractive windows. 
Some of these cost many dollars, and 
would not be in place in the smaller 
stores, but a miniature copy of the gen- 
eral design, used only on particular oc- 
casions, would revive an interest that 
might be flagging as a result of only 
ordinary displays. The goods them- 
selves in nine out of ten arrangements 
are all that is necessary for windows 
that will sell, and the tenth can be so 
made up that the features of it that cost 
money can be retained for future dis- 
. plays, and the expense thus be reduced 
to a minimum. 



Hardware and 

Metal 




AN ARCHITECT ON TORONTO PLUMBING 



,m has l>eeu< 



SITUATION. 



considerable discussion 
carried ori in the daily 
press as a result of a charge that 
■*^» there is "a combine among Toronto 

•a plumbers to prevent legitimate 
competition on all contracts, to compel 
manufacturers to grant a discount in 
favor of association members and to un- 
duly raise prices. 

Most of the discussion lias been con- 
tributed to people " on the outside," 
who have suspicions but no real knowl- 
edge of the existing conditions. 

Architect S. G. Curry is recognized, 
however, as being in intimate touch 
with • building operations of all kinds. 
His opinion is consequently interesting. 
His contribution to the discussion is 
given in the Toronto Star as follows: 

" Thei'e is more of a combine between 
certain architects and plumbers than 
there is among the plumbers just now. 
Some architects in this town take a rake- 
off on plumbing contracts. There may 
or there may not be a combine at the 
present time. Sometimes I am almost 
sure that a concise understanding ex- 
ists, but there is one thing about it, if 
it exists, it does not last for very long. 
Such a thing is unworkable, because 
there are bound to be internal dissen- 
sions over big contracts. Say one big 
lirm comes along and lavs claim to the 
contract on a big building on the ground 
that the capitalist chiefly interested has 
always been a customer of his. Then 
another man turns up and says that the 
original company which the capitalist is 
backing was a customer of his, and there 
is trouble right away. The association 
may say split the profits; but how many 
men would stick to an agreement which 
provided that course? How long would 
they be able to enforce it? 

" Now, here are figures that you could 
utilize to prove your contention that 
a combine exists," and Mr. Curry 
tinned up his contract book and 
showed the tenders on a $600 job. The 
figures ran up m' $20 to $25 jumps to 



$725. The contract in question was a 
recent one. 

" Now, that looks as if an agree- 
ment had been reached, doesn't it?" 
questioned the architect. " Well, just 
look at this," and he leafed back to 
contracts made in the period of build- 
ing stagnation. These figures showed 
the same steady increase. 

" I happen to know positively that 
no combination existed then," said Mr. 
Curry. " So you see that the figures 
prove nothing. You may twist them to 
show a combination or you may with 
safety argue that there was a healthy 
business competition. I do not think 
that a combine to any extent exists now. 
Here is a job I roughly estimated at 
$2,000 a few weeks ago. The contract 
was let for $2,250, with a few extras I 
had not reckoned on in my estimate, 
which was a rough one at best. Take 
the abnormal state of the wage market 
and the advance recently in the price of 
materials and you can consistently ac- 
count for the heavv advance in plumb- 
ing" work. 

"I do not think there is any doubt 
about it that the supply houses have 
combined to a certain extent, but I am 
of the opinion that the combination only 
exists for the purpose of blacklisting bad 
debtors. In the building trade there is 
an unsual chance for bad debts. Men 
whose standing would not secure them 
one-fifth of the credit they are given 
by those in the trade' are able to get al- 
most any quantity of material owing to 
the existence of the lien law, which 
gives the supply house a hold on the 
stuff they have credited a man with. To 
collect through a lien is a matter of 
much annoyance, and the supply houses 
have simply combined to blacklist the 
delinquents. Some people say that in- 
stead of charging an advance a straight 
refusal of goods should be made, but 
you know that it would not be the best 
policy to do that. 



" I suppose the plumbers do combine 
to a certain extent, but I do not think 
that it is as bad as it is made out to be. 
At least I have not found it so." 



# 



Copper for Steam-fittings. 

T the meeting of the Manchester 
Association of Engineers, held on 
December 5, a paper on " Some 
Applications of Copper in Engineering 
Practice " was read by Mr. W. E. 
Storey. An impression, said the lectur- 
er, prevailed that as a material for use 
in the construction of pipes and vessels 
in connection with steam service, cop- 
per at the present time was under a 
cloud. The conditions under which it 
was now frequently applied had increas- 
ed in stringency, particularly along the 
lines of higher pressures and temper- 
atures and largely because of a lack of 
progress in design to meet these condi- 
tions, due to a want of knowledge of the 
possibilities and limitations of the metal. 
. He hoped to be able to show how by 
careful attention to design on the part 
of the engineer, and to production and 
treatment on the part of those who 
combined to supply him with either the 
materials for his own manipulation, or 
the finished copper products, the ad- 
vantages which undoubtedly attended 
the use of copper and its alloys might 
be safely utilised. The main claims that 
copper had to consideration and in fact 
to pre-eminence amongst the metals of 
commerce, so far as its special qualities 
were concerned, were (a) Its high elec- 
trical conductivity, (b) its capacity of 
conducting heat, (c) its extreme ductil- 
ity, and (d) its resistance to corrosion. 
On the first of these he had nothing 
now to say; the second and third taken 
together might be said to be of extreme 
importance to engineers; while, the last 
also had its interest, for such uses of 
copper as the manufacturing chemist, 
the calico printer and bleacher. Copper 
gained its place in the regard of en- 
gineers because of its unequalled power 
of transmitting heat and its great duc- 
tility, which enabled it to be worked in- 
to intricate forms with ease to the oper- 
ator and without fatigue to the metal. 
A common cause of deterioration in the 



4B 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




RAMSAY'S 
PAINTS 

GET 
READY ! 

Look after your trade for 1904, it's going to be a big one. 

Have you got a decent share of the trade in your town ? 
If not, let us get after it for you with Ramsay's Paints. 

Ramsay's Faints talk and bring you trade that pays. 

Ramsay's Paints sell at a price that nobody grumbles 
about — the lowest price for the best paint — not too high for 
profit making. 

Let us tell you about it. 



A. RAMSAY & SON 
MONTREAL 



EST'D 
1842 



THE PAINT 
MAKERS 



J. Nicklin & Oo. 

Great Charles Street, Birmingham, Eng. 



LSAJONIC! 

r »10£ MORI 1 



MAKERS OF. 



Curtain Rings, Tinned Blind Rings, 
Brass Rimmed Tablets, 

Also the following: 



Mill Brand Pasteier. 



"Lion 



906 



Brass Sail Eyelet and Ring 




s Jramped L4&BI: — '^ 




Canadian Agent: F. P. ROGER, 30 Wellington St. W., TORONTO. 



ffi ^^i*w**«<\^w»/l/W»^/ l «***«i^*v*''»» 



**^^f*^*l^ ^ ^Aii n*% wl^m* 



FARMERS' FEED BOILERS 




The "ACME" 

A Boiler With Talking Points- 
Steel Body— Return Flue. 



J 
I 

i 



Made in three sizes, with or without cover. 
No. 30, capacity - - i bbl. 

a a r « _ _ l l/ 2 « 



(i 



45> 
60, 






<< 



Write for prices. 



CLARE BROS. & CO. 

LIMITED 

Preston and Winnipeg 



**S^f*+**/lfr+rJ^f*iJ^jf**S^f*m^\f+»*»l{^*m**/lfr+*t\fmm*\^mt\S*+-**/^ ^ 



V.) 



H«rdw»r« 

Met.l 



tnd 



HE ATI NO AND PLUMBING 



quality and strength of copper was its 
contact whilst hot with a reducing gas. 
These conditions caused a chemical 
change in the copper, rendering it brit- 
tle, and the effect could easily he pro- 
duced on the brazing hearth by allowing 
the fire to be sluggish and short of the 
requisite amount of air-blast. Careless- 
ness in that respect on the part of the 
workman was one of the most serious 
dangers coSjj&r \\a<\ to meet. Although 
* copper hadnuftiy virtues as a material 
for the use of engineers there were cer- 
tain faults attaching to it. Amongst 
these were the following: For the con- 
ductivity of either electricity or heat 
purity was an advantage, but chemically 
pure copper had very little resistance to 
wear. Its ductility formed its most im- 
portant advantage to the coppersmith 
and the makers of plates, tubes, rods, 
and so forth; but this ductility was 
gained at the cost of a very low elastic 
limit. Notwithstanding the loss of 
strength resulting from subjection to 
high temperatures and to the action of 
certain gases, copper remained incom- 
parably the best material for many pur- 
poses in the general practice of engin- 
eers. An interesting discussion follow- 
ed the reading of the paper, particularly 
witli regard to the use of copper steam- 
pipes, the consensus of opinion being 
that solid-drawn copper pipes were more 
reliable than brazed pipes. In main 
steam ranges for high pressure, steel 
was thought to possess a great advant- 
age over copper in the matter of price, 
whilst being at least equally reliable. 
The use of copper was, however, ad- 
vantageous for expansion pipes and 
making up pipes. It was urged that 
cheapness was not the greatest economy 
in copper pipes, for unless a sufficient 
price were paid it was impossible to get 
good workmanship, and the result of 
using copper pipes under such condi- 
tions was likely to prove unsatisfactory. 
— Ironmonger. 

The London Boiler Explosion. 

In reply to an enquiry by " Hard- 
ware and Metal " Wm. Smith, of the 
Smith Plumbing Co.. London, Out., 
writes: " Re the explosion of hot water 
boilers at the Wolseley Barracks, in my 
mind there is no doubt but that it was 
the shutting off of the main valves that 
caused it. There were two boilers, 
which were connected together with 
twin headers, and each boiler was valved 
on the connection between boiler and 
header. IT those were open it would be 
impossible to explode them." 



U. S. Sanitary Earthenware Trade. 

THE Potteries Selling Company of 
Trenton, N.J., who were incor- 
porated in New Jersey, on De- 
cember 16, with a capital stock of $50,- 
000, have practically taken over the 
business of the Sanitary Potters' Asso- 
ciation. As a result of their incorpora- 
tion it is said that the injunction re- 
cently issued by the United States 
Court of Appeals affecting all Siphon 
Jets and Hoppers, and which has re- 
sulted in increased prices on these types 
of closets, has been filed against each 
and every manufacturing potter in 
Trenton. The Potteries Selling Com- 
pany have obtained the sole right to 
manufacture Siphon Jet Closets and 
Siphon Hoppers in the United States. 
The Dececo Company, of Boston, Mass., 
who are the assignees of the patent 
rights of William Smith, the inventor 
of the Siphon Jet Closet, is to be paid a 
royalty on each closet made. The Pot- 
teries Selling Company, aside from those 
incorporators just named, are composed 
o'f one member from each of the follow- 
ing concerns: The Trenton Potteries 
Company, Thomas Maddock's Sons Com- 
pany, Belrnar Pottery Company, Iron- 
sides Pottery Company, Keystone Pot- 
tery Company, Great Western Pottery 
Company, Riverside Pottery Company, 
Berrian Pottery Company, Standard 
Sanitary Pottery Company, Acme Sani- 
tary Pottery Company, Fidelity Pottery 
Company, Elite Pottery Company, Cam- 
den Pottery Company, Mercer Pottery 
Company, Sanitary Earthen Ware Spe- 
cialty Company, Willetts Mfg. Company 
and the Universal Sanitary Mfg. Com- 
pany. Owing to their membership in 
the Potteries Selling Company they_are 
privileged to manufacture staple Siphon 
Jets, Siphon Acting Hoppers and Traps, 
and Siphon Hoppers with Jets, for which 
privilege they will pay the Potteries 
Selling Company a royalty, which in 
turn is paid over to the Dececo Com- 
pany. This practically gives t he Pot- 
teries Selling Company absolute control 
of the Sanitary Earthen Ware situation 
in the United States and those who are 
not affiliated with them cannot manu- 
facture these goods. This type of closet 
is used more than any other, and it is 
practically impossible for any sanitary 
pottery to exist without the privilege of 
manufacturing this class of ware. Un- 
der date of December 16 telegrams with- 
drawing the discounts on prices of Sani- 
tary Earthen "Ware were issued to the 
trade, and new. nrices were announced 
which show advances of from 10 to 30 
50 



per cent. Staple articles are the only 
ones on which quotations have been 
made so far. All articles not included 
in the staple list will be quoted in the 
near future. The details regarding the 
new selling company and the reasons 
for (lie advance in prices have recently 
been explained in a letter issued to the 
trade. -The Metal Worker. 

Plumbing and Heating Notes. 

A curator has been appointed to 1'. 
Sicard. plumber, Montreal. 

F. A. Carpenter & Co., wholesale deal- ' 
ers in steam fitters supplies, Hamilton, 
have assigned to C. S. Scott. 

The premises of C. Destrempes, plumb- 
er and tinsmith, St. Cuthbert, Que., have 
been burned out: no insurance. 

Building Notes. 

The Ottawa post -office, a .$100,000 
building, was burned on Monday night. 

The Mount Royal Club, Montreal, was 
burned on Tuesday morning. It will be 
rebuilt. 

The National Club, Toronto, have de- 
cided to purchase the Robinson property. 
Bay street, and to erect a club house 
costing in all $105,000. 

Building Permits Issued. 

MONTREAL. 

P. Decarrie, 325 Centre street, to erect 
on 526 Centre, a two-storey third class 
dwelling house, to cost $1,800. 

Mrs. H. R. Prefontaine, 318 Sher- 
brooke street, to erect on Duquette street 
a one-storey factory, dimensions 30x80, 
to cost $1,500. 

The Metropolitan Bank, Toronto, to 
erect on St. James street, a six-storey 
building, dimensions 29x110, to cost 
$80,000: L. Beaudry contractor. 

Michael Tracey, 334 St. Patrick street, 
to erect on St. Patrick street a two- 
storey third class house forming two 
dwellings; dimensions 19x54; to cost 
$1,500. 

N. Forget, 1051-2 Lusingnon street, to 
erect on Barre street two two-storey 
third class houses each forming two 
dwellings; dimensions of each 33x2!); to 
cost $1,700 each. 



The Rainy River Lumber Co., Rainy 
River, Ont., have been incorporated with 
a capital of 81,000,000, to carry on the 
business of lumbermen, saw and planing 
millers and manufacturers of lumber and 
woodenware. The directors arc T. H. 
Shelvni, K. I.. Carpenter, and W. F. 
Brooks, all of Minneapolis, U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



"Dominion Brand" Tarred Felt. 



THE BEST THAT MONEY CAN BUY 



" Shield Brand " Ready Roofing, 2 and 3-ply. 

QUICK SELLERS. 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY' 



SLockerby & McComb, 65 Shannon St., Montreal % 
^_ Bell Telephone Main 1989. §N 



CANADIAN ASBESTOS. 

THE larger portion of the supply of 
asbestos is now furnished by Can- 
ada, in which country the produc- 
tion has increased from 50 tons in 187S 
to 10,420 tons (value, si, 203,152) in 1902. 
In the latter year the United States fur- 
nished 1,010, and Italy and Russia 2,000 
tons of asbestos. The brittle hornblende 
asbestos is chiefly used, says a contem- 
porary, where resistance to heat and 
acids is demanded, but for spinning only 
the highly elastic fibers of serpentine or 
chrysolite asbestos are suitable. The 
elasticity of asbestos libers appears to 
diminish with their content of water ; 
consequently, fibers which have been sub- 
jected to high temperatures by reason of 
forest fires are brittle. 



In Canada the kinds of asbestos found, 
on the one hand, at Templeton. and on 
the other at Black Lake and Thetford. 
are geologically different. In the former 
case the serpentine occurs in Crystalline 
limestone stratified with gneiss, as long 
bands without sharp edges, or in ellip- 
soidal forms. The asbestos runs through 
the serpentine, parallel to the edges of 
the latter, in veins from I to 10 mm. 
thick, and, at the most, 'A m. long. The 
occurrence of serpentine in this district is 
not, however, sufficiently uniform or reg- 
ular to allow of profitable mining, al • 
though the asbestos is of excellent qual- 
ity, 

Of more commercial importance are the 
deposits at Thetford and Black Lake, he 
tween Sherbrook and Quebec, 150 miles 
west of Montreal. Here the serpentine is 



associated with Cambrian scliist. con 
■i'lomerate and quartzitic sandstone : it 
contains nodules and masses of steatite 
and chrome ironstone, and also, though 
not invariably, veins of asbestos from 5 
to 80 mm. thick and up to 20 m. lon^- 
The asbestos is silky and very els 
but is frequently torn and disintegrated 
by fissures and clefts. The mining is 
mostly carried on in open workings. The 
better kinds of asbestos are sorted by 
hand and are divided into the classes : 
'Crude 1," with fibers over l\ inches 
long, and "Crude 2." with fibers from J 
to 1} inches long. fn the mechanical 
process of preparation the libers are fre- 
quently disintegrated ; the product is 
separated into two classes- viz. : 

"Fiber," that with the long fillers, and 
"Paper Stock," with the shorter ones. 



PAGE LAWN FENCE 



Indestnu-tiU handsome, Perfect. Only 20 cents per running foot. 
Supplied by us or local dealer. 



202 



THE PAGE WIRG FENCE CO. Limited. 



Walkerville, Montreal, Winnipeg, St, John 




51 



Hardware and 
Metal 



FINANCE AND INSURANCE 



Of all the financial institutions of Canada 
receiving money on deposit, only three have 
a paid-up Capital as great as that of the 
Canada Permanent Mortgage Corporation, 
Toronto Street, Toronto. 

A deposit account with this exceptionally 
strong institution may be opened with one 
dollar. Interest allowed at three and one- 
half per cent, per annum, compounded 
half-yearly. 

If not a resident of Toronto, you can conveniently 
deposit by mail. Send your address for our booklet 
"SAVING MONEY BY MAIL." 



«^~ Money ^s 

CAW BE SAVED BY MEANS 
OF AN ENDOWMENT POLICY. 

YOU CAN ONLY SECURE 
SUCH A POLICY WHILE YOU 
ARE IN GOOD HEALTH. 



Pamphlets and Full Particulars regarding the 

New Accumulation Endowment Policy 

sent on application. 



Confederation Life 

ASSOCIATION. 

W. H. BEATTY, president. 
W.C. MACDONALD, J. K. MACDONALD, 

ACTUARY. MANAGING DIRECTOR. 

HEAD OFFICE, - TORONTO, CANADA. 



In the Execution of Trusts 
THE TORONTO GENERAL TRUSTS CORPORATION 

takes every precaution to prevent loss. No investment is made 
without the approval of the Executive Committee. All invest- 
ments are registered in the Corporation's books in the names of 
the Estates to which they belong, and are kept separate and 
apart from the assets of the Corporation. 

The entire resources of the Corporation are responsible for 
the faithful peiformance of Trusts administered by it. 



CAPITAL, 
RESERVE FUND, 



$1,000,000 
290,000 



Your Bank Account 

Will receive every care if kept at 

Che Bank of Coronto. 


Head Offi 


:e : • 


• TORONTO. 


Paid-up Capital 
$2,950,000.00 

Reserve Fund 
$3,150,000.00 

Total Assets (over) 
$24,000,000.00 

Incorporated 1855. 




BUSINESS ACCOUNTS 

Invited. 

SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 

receive interest 
every six months. 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMENCE 

Paid-up Capital, $8,700,000 

Rest, .... $3,000,000 

HON. GEO. A. COX, President. B. E. WALKER, General Manager. 

HEAD OFFICE : TORONTO, CANADA. 



LONDON, EN«3 , OFFICE. 
60 Lombard St., E.C. 



NEW YORK AQENCY. 
16 Exchange Place. 



The attention of exporters and importers ia requested to the undernoted list 
of correspondents of this bank, embracing ail parts of the world. In conjunction 
with its widespread system of branches, numbering 105, and covering all important 
points in Canada and on the Pacific coast of the United States, it is thus enabled 
to offer them unexcelled facilities for the transaction of domestic or foreign 
banking business. 



List of Bankers and 

GREAT BRITAIN- 

The Bank of England ; The Bank of 
Scotland ; Lloyds Bank Limited ; The 
Union of London and Smiths Bank, 
Limited ; Parr's Bank, Limited. 
UNITED STATES 
New York, The American Exchange 
.National Bank, The Fourth National 
Bank ; Boston The Bank of Nova 
Scotia, The National Shawmut Bank, 
The National Suffolk Bank; Buffalo, 
The Marine National Bank; Chi- 
cago, The Northern Trust Company; 
Detroit, The People's Savings Bank, 
The Commercial National Bank ; 
Minneapolis, The North-Western 
National Bank ; New Orleans, 
The Commercial National Bank. 

FRANCE - 

Credit Lyonnais, Paris; Messrs. Lazard 

Freres k Cie, Paris. 

QERrlANY- 

Deutsche Bank. 

HOLLAND— 

Disconto Maatschappij, Rotterdam. 

BELOW/I— 

Messrs. J. Matthieu k Fils, Brussels; 

Banque d'Anvers, Antwerp. 

SWITZERLAND- 

La Banque Federale, Zurich. 

Foreign Exchange Bought and Sold. 



Chiet Correspondents : 

INDIA, CHINA, JAPAN and the 
PHILIPPINE ISLANDS— 

Chartered Bank of India, Australia 
and China; Hongkong and Shanghai 
Banking Corporation. 
SOUTH AFRICA- 
Standard Bank of South Africa, Liui 
ited ; Bank of Africa, Limited. 
AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEA- 
LAND— 

Union Bank of Australia, Limited 
Bank of Australasia ; National Bank 
of Australasia, Limited. 
HAWAIIAN ISLANDS- 
First National Bank of Hawaii, Hono- 
lulu ; Bishop & Co., Honolulu. 
SOUTH AMERICA- 
British Bank of South America, 
Limited; London & Brazilian Bank 
Limited ; Bank of Tarapaca and Ar- 
gentina, Limited. 

riEXico- 

Banco de Londres y Mexico. 
WEST INDIES— 

Bank of Nova Scotia, Kingston, Ja- 
maica ; Colonial Bank and Branches ; 
National Bank of Cuba, Havana, Cuba: 
Bank of Bermuda, Hamilton, Bermuda. 

Commercial Letters of Credit Issued. 



The Metropolitan Bank 



$1,000,000. 

1,000,000. 



CAPITAL PAID UP, - 
RESERVE FUND, 

DIRECTORS. 

Rev. R. H. WARDEN, D.D., President. S. J. MOORE, Vice-President. 

C. D. MASSEY, T. BRADSHAW, F.I.A., D. E. THOMSON, K.C. 

HEAD OFFICE., - - TORONTO. 

"W. D. ROSS, -:- General Manager. 



SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT 

at all Branches. 

Interest allowed on all deposits of $1.00 and upwards at highest 
current rates. 



Hardware and 
Metal 




AN examination of the list of stockholders in 
Canadian banks reveals the surprising fact 
that directors of the various banks are com- 
paratively small holders of the stock in the 
institutions represented by them. In nearly 
every case they hold personally an insignificant propor- 
tion of the capital stock and many of them own barely 
enough to qualify for a bank director. Does it not ap- 
pear a little strange that those to whom the piloting of 
a financial ship is entrusted should have so little prac- 
tical interest in it? 



• • • 



THE banks of Canada raised their entire authorized 
capitalization to $97,046,666 during the ten months 
of 1903, ending with October, an increase of $13,- 
714,100 over last year's capitalization; their paid up 
capital to $49,989,361, an increase of $5,471,680; their 
note circulation to $70,480,611, an increase of $9,906,467; 
their demand deposits to $118,070,088, an increase of 
$2,179,639; their notice deposits to $275,939,608, an in- 
crease of $21,721,739: their aggregate loans to $452,- 
137,008, an increase of $34,168,075; and their assets to 
$660,520,201, an increase of $25,131,992; call loans in 
Canada have been nulled down by nearly $11,000,000, 
and current loans for commercial purposes increased to 
the extent of $59,953,073. 

• • • 

A" COMMUNITY of interest " agreement has been 
arranged between the Dresdner Bank and the 
Shaaffhausen Bankverein, two of the largest banks 
of the German Empire, making the new combination, as 
far as mere capital is concerned the strongest banking 
institution in Germany. The capital of the Dresdner 
Bank is £6,500,000, with £1,700,000 reserves; that of the 
Schaaffhausen Bankverein £5,000,000 with £1,000,000 re- 
serves. Thus the combination will have a total active 
capital of £14,200,000. In future both banks will con- 
duct their business in common while maintaining each 
its separate existence, and will divide their earnings 
upon the basis of the capital and reserves of each insti- 
tution. At the same time, two directors and three mem- 
bers of the Board of Overseers of each bank are to be 
elected by the other bank, thus securing a personal as 
well as a financial union. The form of union here out- 
lined is not uncommon in Germany. Many industrial 
establishments have become allied on the same basis, and 
two of the chief banks of the kingdom of Wurtemberg 
have maintained a similar arrangement for above 20 

vears. . 

• • • 

IT is rumored that English life assurance companies 
are becoming alarmed at the shrinkage in their Can- 
adian business. The offices of home companies are 
rapidly increasing their business, while the branches of 
English companies situated in Canada show a record of 
steadily diminishing receipts. One reason given for this 
is the protective measures adopted by the colonies in re- 
spect to insurance. Another reason undoubtedly is the 



comparatively low rate of interest on securities prevail- 
ing in England. Insurance companies can realize more 
on their investments than the English companies and have 
the additional advantage of being on the inside in the 

event of competition. 

• • • 

THE new president of the American Bankers' Asso- 
ciation is Mr. F. G. Bigelow, president of the First 
National Bank of Milwaukee. Mr. Bigelow is recog- 
nized all over the States as one of the ablest bankers in the 
country. He is in addition a man who has kept in close 
touch with and taken a prominent part in the initiation 
and development of the more important industrial and 
commercial enterprises in the United States. 

• • • 

A LEADING exchange says there is no business or 
profession which offers so much freedom and inde- 
pendence, and such excellent opportunities to young 
Canadians of enterprise and energy as that of life in- 
surance. In these days of the strenuous life, no matter 
what profession or business a person is engaged in, suc- 
cess cannot be achieved bv sitting down and " waiting 
for something to turn up." But the young man who 
applies the same amount of energy, determination and 
systematic work to the conducting of a life insurance 
agency as might be applied bv him to any other profes- 
sion or business, will, as a rule, secure a greater imme- 
diate return, establish a more permanent income and 
have better prospects of ultimately attaining to a prom- 
inent position equivalent to that held by most men in the 
commercial, financial or professional life of the country. 

• • • 

AS far as the leading banks are concerned business 
throughout the Northwest this year has been 
greatly hampered by the enactments of the Grain 
Act. Although the banks have made special provision 
in order to meet all demands, they find that their money 
will now be tied up until the opening of navigation 
simply because in many instances farmers have been 

unable to get a sufficient number of cars. 

» * • 

THE Havana Post refers to the recent completion of 
the Cuba Railroad between Santiago de Cuba and 
Havana, and of the new electric railroad running 
from Havana to Marianoo, as memorable events for Cuba 
and Canada. Both are Canadian enterprises; the Cuba 
Railroad owes its existence to Canadian capital and the 
Canadian railway magnate Sir Wm. Van Home, and will 
undoubtedly prove a great factor in the development of 
Cuba. The new electric railroad was built mostly with 
Canadian capital, its president being E. Hanson, one of 

the most progressive of Canadians. 

• • • 

The New York Clearing House Association has made 
an announcement to the effect that they are considering 
the question of charging on cheques issued on points out- 
side of New York. All items, from whomsoever re- 
ceived payable «t points in Canada, the collecting banks 



53 



Met..) 



>nd 



PINANCB AND INSURANCE 



shall charge not less than one-quarter of one per cent, 
of the amount of the items. In case the charge upon 
any item at the rates specified does not equal ten cents, 
the collecting bank shall charge no less than that sum; 
but all items received from any one person at the same 
time, and payable at the same place, may be added to- 
gether and treated as one* item for the purpose of fixing 
the amount chargeable. 

INCREASE IN ACCIDENT INSURANCE. 

A BIG increase in the volume of accident insurance 
has necessitated the formation of what is to be 
known as the Canadian Accident Underwriters' 
Association, consisting of two sections, each with a gov- 
erning council, one in Toronto, the other in Montreal. D. 
Murphy, Ottawa, has been elected president of the asso- 
ciation, and J. Hyde, Montreal, and W. H. Cross, To- 
ronto, joint secretaries, one for the Eastern, the other 
for the Western field. 

In answer to the question what are the objects of the 
proposed association? one of the officers said: "Now, 
all insurance is based upon the law of averages. Sel- 
dom, however, do two men think alike; so that when a 
new risk appears, though the assessors of the various 
accident companies may approximately agree upon its 
value, no one will be actually correct. But, if many 
combine, their average will be approximately right. The 
striking of proper averages along the whole line of risks 
will, therefore, be one of the objects of the proposed 
association. 

" Again, the law on the subject of accidents, espe- 
cially in factories, requires watching by the companies 
for their own protection ; not perhaps with a view to its 
amendment, but to so draw the insurance contracts as to 
protect the companies in case of actions brought by un- 
scrupulous persons who have no right to relief under the 
law, but who strive to make the company in which they 
may be insured a party plaintiff. Besides, one company 
may frame its contract in certain words, while another, 
meaning the same thing, will draft theirs in different 
terms. When these contracts come to be interpreted by 
the courts, and especially by juries diverse meanings 
willl be accorded to each. The association will strive to 
so identify these policies in their form as to avoid this 
difficulty." 



FINANCE AND INSURANCE NOTES. 

The business of the Empire Loan and Savings Co. 
has been transferred to the Sun and Hastings Savings 
and Loan Co., of Ontario. 



The site occupied by the Molsons Bank at the corner 
of King and Bay streets, Toronto, has been sold to the 
Canada Life Assurance Co. 

The Bank of Montreal has recently established 
branches at Edmonton, Alberta: Gretna. Man.; and 
Sherman avenue, Hamilton. 

Blair & Co, bankers, St. John, N.B., have suspended. 
The house has been in business about fifteen years and 
consists of A. C. and A. Blair. 

Halifax banking institutions are reported to have 
made great strides during the year 1903, bank clearings 
showing an increase of $5,334,729 over 1902. 

The London Financial News is authority for the 
statement that there is talk of the establishment of a 
special department on the London Stock Exchange to 
be devoted exclusively to Canadian secui'ities. 

W. R. Travers, manager of Merchants' Bank, Ham- 
ilton, has resigned, owin" to ill-health. His successor 
is A. B. Patterson, manager of the St. Thomas branch. 

The past season has been the most disastrous for in- 
land lake marine underwriters since 1898. Their aggre- 
gate losses, including cargoes, were about $2,100,000. 
which also represents the total amount of premiums 
paid. 

The old banking house of E. D. O'Flyn & Sons, 
Madoc, have sold out to the Dominion Bank. F. W. 
O'Flyn remains as manager of the Dominion Bank, 
Madoc, and H. H. O'Flyn, has accepted a position with 
the bank in Toronto. 

In compliance with a request from the civic authori- 
ties from London, Out., the Fire Underwriters Associa- 
tion have agreed to reduce fire insurance rates in that 
city as soon as certain improvements in the fire protec- 
tion system are made. 

The Bank of Montreal is erecting premises for the 
branch at Birchy Cove, Newfoundland. It has also ac- 
quired a property at the corner of Greene and Western 
avenue, Westmount, where premises are being erected 
for the occupation of a branch to be established there. 



U 



Financial and Commercial Corporations 
ask applicants for positions to furnish a 
Guarantee Bond instead of letters of 
recommendation. For particulars apply 



DOMINION OF CANADA 
GUARANTEE & ACCIDENT INSURANCE CO. 

Cor. King and Vonge Sts., TORONTO. 
J. E.. ROBERTS, - General Manager. 



w 



ncorporated 
1851 



ESTERN 

ASSURANCE 
COMPANY. 



• • 



FIRE 

AND 

MARINE 



Head Office 



Capital 

Toronto, Assets, over - 
Otlt. Annual Income 

HON. GEO. A. COX. President. 



$2,000,000.00 
3.333,000.00 
3,536.000.00 



J. J. KENNY, Vice-President and Man. Director. 

C. C. FOSTER, Secretary. 



BRITISH AMERICA 
ASSURANCE COMP'Y 



FIRE AND MARINE. 



Incorporated 1833 



CASH CAPITAL, $1,000,000.00. 

TOTAL ASSETS, $1,864,730.13. 

LOSSES PAID SINCE ORGANIZATION, $22,!>27,817.57. 

HEAD OFFICE. - BRITISH AMERICA BUILDINO, 
Cor. Front and Scott Sts.. Toronto. 

GEO. A. COX, President. J. J. KENNY, Vice-President. 

P. H. SIMS, Secretary. 



54 



hardware and metal 



INDUSTRIAL GOSSIP 



Hardware and Metal would be pleased to receive from any authoritative source industrial news of any sort, the 
formation or incorporation of companies, establishment or enlargement of mills, factories foundries or other 
works, railway or mining news, etc. All such correspondence will he treated as confidential when desired. 



THE Double Use Mitten Co. j incorpor- 
ated in the State of Illinois, have 
been licensed by the Ontario 
Government to manufacture and sell in 
Ontario all kinds of g'loves and mitts, 
provided that in so doing- they do not 
use a larger capital than the sum of 
*75,000. 

The Trent Power Co., Trenton, Out.. 
have been incorporated with a capital of 
£500,000, to construct, maintain aod 
operate works for the production and 
distribution of electrical energy for tin 1 
purposes of light, heat and power. The 
directors are I). Gilmour and R. Weddell. 
both of Trenton; Hon. S. H. Blake, E. 
W. McNeil, and R. Gowans, all of Toron- 
to. 

• • • 

Mining is active in the Superior region. 
Among- the mining men who visited 
Toronto this week were W. Wyiie, Port 
Arthur, desiring a Government drill for 
use on an iron range near Lake Nepigon ; 
E\ flille. Port Arthur, and W. McYittic. 
Sudbury, in the interests of iron deposits. 
Mr. McYittic reports that The Canadian 
Copper Co. are rushing business on their 
new smelter at Copper Cliff. 

* * • 

General Manager Hays, of the Grand 
'Trunk, says that the Grand Trunk Paci- 
fic will certainly be started in the Spring. 

The Mond Nickel Co.. London, Eng- 
land, have closed down the Victoria 
mines at Sudbury, Ont. The reason 
given for the action is that they have a 
surplus stock on hand, and therefore have 
suspended operations for a time. The 
smelters at the mines have been leased to 
The International Copper Co. of Phila- 
delphia, for smelting copper from Masscy 

Station. 

* # # 

The Corundum Refiners, Ltd.. Toronto, 
have been incorporated with a capital of 
Sl, 000,001 1, to carry on in all its branches 
the operations of a mining, milling, re- 
duction and development company. The 
directors are -I. V Scatcherd, C. R. 
Huntley and J. C. Conway, all of Buf- 
falo ; J. A. Roberts. New York: J. H. 
Tilden and IT. P. Coburn, of Hamilton. 
Ont.; H. H. Dewart, W. Vandusen, •). H. 
.Jewell, all of Toronto : anil W. B. Ran- 
kine. Niagara Ealls. Om. 

* • • 

The output of The Dominion Coal Co.. 
Cape Breton, for the past year was ap 
proximately 3,150,00? tons, and ship- 



ments 2,806,000, practically the same as 
for the year preceding. The year 1904 
will in all probability show a very mater- 
ial increase in these figures. President 
•Tames Ross gave out the following state 
ment last week : "Now that the coal 
company have taken over the monage 
ment of their own affairs I might say 
that the chief feature of the policy of the 
company will be to increase the output 
as rapidly as possible. Our output has 
now reached all but L5,000 tons a day, 
while last Thursday out of No. 2 Domin- 
ion mine 1,900 tons were taken.'' 

• * • 

The plant of The Union Carbide Co., 
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.. the largest plant 
for the manufacture of calcium carbide in 
the world, has commenced operations. 
This is the first industry to use power 
from the power canal of The Michigan 
Lake Superior Power Co. Half of the 
machinery is installed in the big power 
house, and the plant proper connects 
with the building, and the two make a 
building nearly half a mile in length. The 
plant starts with about 300 men at work, 
and the force will be increased as fast as 
possible 'until 1,000 are employed. The 
plant will run night and day. The de- 
mand for carbide is great and the com- 
pany have many orders to fill. 

• • • 

The Rossi and Miner estimates the out- 
put of the district at 377. 134 tons, with 
a value of S4,631,2S0. During the ten 
years of the camp's history 1,687,768 tons 
of ore has been produced, having an es- 
timated value of 826,816,342. The camp 
has enjoyed a most prosperous year, and 
notable strides have been accomplished 
in conoection with the mining industry. 
The increase in tonnage is approximately 
50,000 tons over last year. A notable 
feature was the inauguration of concen- 
tration and its successful application. 
The Le Roi No. 2 plant is now treating 
at a profit ores carrying net values in 
excess of $5.50, and the margin will be 
substantially lowered in the larger plants 
now in course of construction. 

• • • 

NOTES. 

E. S. Brennan & Co.. of Hamilton, 
have arranged to erect a large sawmill 
on I heir new limits in the Township of 
Osborne. Nipissing County, in the Spring, 

Shedden Brush Co.. Hamilton, have 

I a incorporated with a capital of |40, 

000, to manufacture and deal in brushes. 

55 



The directors arp 1*.. Shrddon. G. Shed 
den. and i). Carson, all of Hamilton. 

Il is announced that II. \l . Whitney, of 
boston, has resigned his position as vice 
president of The Dominion Coal Co., and 
is also retiring from the board of direc 

tors. He is succeeded by .1. P. Wilson. 
Montreal. 

The Industrial progress of Sydney. 

N.S.. was marked at the beginning of the 
year by the incorporation of the muniei 
polity as a city. Sydney is now an im 
portant port, the customs, duties for 1903 
being SP.I2.MV.I. 

The Canadian Cooperage Manufacturing- 
Co., Galetta, Out., have been incorpor 
ated with a capita] of 8100,000, to manu- 
facture and deal in cooperage stock. The 
directors are A. H. Royee, Ceo. Royce 
and J as. (ioldthorpe, ull of Toronto. 

The Canada National Land and Uevel 
opment Co., Toronto, have been incor 
poroted with a capital of 850,000, to 
deal in real estate. The directors are 

A. Cartwright, Bedford Jones, Olarkson 
■Jones and R. B. Beaumont, all of Toron- 
to. 

The plans calling for the construction 
of a system of two-storey steel freight 
sheds in the Montreal harbor at the cost 
of §2,500,000, have been approved by the 
Deputy Minister of Marine and Fisheries, 
and the work is to be awarded by con 
tract. 

W . E. Chalcraft 6c Co., Toronto. hai r e 
been incorporated with a capital of $100,- 
(00, to carry on a wholesale and retail 
clothing and dry goods business. She 
directors are G. Randall, C. Chalcraft. K. 

B. Howard, C. K. Burt and J. C. Beryer, 
all of Toronto. 

Church & Watt, Simcoe, Ont.. have 
been incorporated with a capital of sill. 
000, to carry on a wholesale and retail 
harness and saddlery business. The 
directors are J. W. Church, Simcoe; W. 
A. Watt, and T. E. Richards, both of St. 
Mary's, Ont. 

Carney Lumber Co.. Masscy, Algoma 
District, have been incorporated with a 
capital of $500,000, to carry on the busi- 
ness of a manufacturer and dealer in 
lumber. The directors tire .). S. Lovcll. 
Wm. Bain. R. Cowans. E. W. McNeil and 
P. Richardson, all of Toronto. 

The Smith Mfg. Co.. Toronto, have been 
incorporated with a capital of $40,000, to 
buy and sell machinery and apparatus 
and to generate light, heat and power. 
The directors are Geo. Smith. G. 11. 
Smith, Alex. Burns, H. S. Harwood, A. 
N. Burns and -I. A. Burns, all of Toron- 
to. 

The output of The Dominion Iron and 
Steel Co.. (ape Breton, for the year 1903 
is estimated at about 140,000 Ions of 
steel billets, and about 130,000 tons of 
pig iron. The overage monthly output 
at present is about 0,000 tons. The work 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



in the construction of the finishing mills 
is being rushed night and day. 

The Ontario Lead and Zinc Co., Port 
Arthur, have been incorporated with a 
capital of $61)0, 010, to carry on in all its 
branches the operations of a mining. 
milling, reduction and development com- 
pany. The directors are E. C. Kennedy, 
Superior, U.S.A.; J. A. Macintosh and 
A. R. Clute, both of Port Arthur. 

Granite, Ltd., Toronto, have been in- 
corporated with a capital of ¥30. (11)0, to 
acquire the property of the Granite Curl- 
ing and Skating Kink. The directors are 
C-. Boech, A. A. Allan. J. Baird, D. S. 
Barclay, G. H. Gooderham, M. Rawlin- 
son, G. 0. Dalton, W. C. Matthews, C. P. 
Smith, F. G. Cox, E. A. Badenach and 
II. S. Patterson, all of Toronto. 

The Dominion Bridge Co. are putting 
in the steel girders on the 10-ft. span at 
Four-Mile Creek on the T. & N. 0. Rail- 
way. This is the first bridge north of 
North Bay. The girders for the bridge 
over the North River are also ready at 
North Bay, but these cannot be installed 
till the Summer, as the shore piers and 
abutments are not yet in. The water 
was too high last Autumn for this work 
to be done, consequently the contractors 
must wait till Spring. 

MONEY BY-LAWS VOTED ON. 

Sandwich.— The by-law to build a sewer 
on Mill street was defeated. The by-law 
to continue the Board of Water Commis- 
sioners was defeated. 

Lindsay.— The by-law to grant $10,000 
for waterworks extension was carried. 

Goderich.— The vote on the by-laws re- 
sulted as follows : C.P.R. bonus, for, 
452, against, 19 ; National Cloak Co., 
for. -172. against, 22 ; school by-law, for. 
162. against, 249. 

St. Mary's.— Carnegie library by-law 
was carried by 27 majority. 

Harriston.— The by-law to aid re-build- 
ing of the High School carried with little 
opposition. The by-law to exempt The 
Uowling-Leighton Co. from taxes was de- 
feated. 

Stayner.— The by-law for the purpose of 
borrowing §10,000 for new cement side- 
walks was carried by 102 majority. 

Kingsville. — By-law granting loan to 
Kingsville Woollen Mills was carried by 
a vote of 216 to 19. 

Collingwood. — The good roads and the 
elevator by-laws carried by large majori- 
ties. 

Brockville. — The vote on a by-law to 
raise $25,000 for improvements to the 
.ighting plant of the town resulted in a 
majority of 100 in favor of the by-law. 
Another by-law to amalgamate the light 
and water boards was defeated by 20 
votes. 

Well and. — The Frost by-law for the ex- 
emption from taxes was defeated. 

Kingston. — The by-law to elect alder- 
men at large was defeated by a large 
majority. 

Athens. — The referendum vote taken at 
Athens on Monday for the location of a 
site for the Town Hall was carried in 
favor of the Green site l>\ a majority of 
81. 

Ingersoll. — The by-laws for the purchase 
of the gas and electric light plants of a 
new town hall were all three defeated by 
large majorities. 

Holland Landing. — Vote on county 
roads system resulted as follows : For, 9, 
against, 46. 



Woodstock. — The by-law to establish a 
free library here was carried by 350 
majority. 

Chatham. — Three by-laws were voted on, 
one to issue debentures to consolidate 
the city's floating debt of §50,Q00, one to 
make a loan of §30,000 to Wybrow, of 
Birmingham, England, to erect a pork 
packing factory, and one to aid a radial 
electric railway by a loan of $50,000'. All 
three were defeated. 

Dundas. — A by-law was carried by a 
majority of 62 for the issue of debentures 
for appropriation of $I4",O00 for side- 
walks. 

Waterloo.— The §10,000 waterworks by- 
law to increase the town's present plant 
carried. The plebiscite re the town's 
purchasing of the electric lighting and 
gas plants also secured a good majority. 

Belleville. — The by-law authorizing the 
council to borrow $50,000 with which to 
purchase, repair, and run the gas works 
as a municipal concern, was carried, the 
vote being, for, 358, against, 337. 

Oshawa. — The citizens by a large major- 
ity voted in favor of pumping water 
from the lake instead of being supplied 
from Raglan Springs. 

Peterboro. — The Street Railway by-law 
was voted on and carried by over 400 
majority. The by-law for the expenditure 
of $10,000 for the purchase of a gravel 
pit was also carried. 

St. Thomas. — Pere Marquette car shops 
b6nus by-law was carried by a large 
majority. The amount voted was 
$20,000. 

Ottawa.— A by-law for $50,000 to es- 
tablish a municipal electric light plant 
was passed. 

Perth. — The by-law for the purchase of 
the plant and equipment of The Perth 
Electric Light Co. by the town was car- 
ried by a majority of 133 votes. The 
free libraiy plebiscite was defeated by 9 
votes. 

Wingham.— A by-law to appropriate 
$36,000 for a new system of waterworks 
and sewerage was defeated by a majority 
of 19. 



Stratford.' — By-laws ratifying the ap- 
pointment of park and water commission- 
ers were carried. 

Strathroy. — The by-law to grant a 
$5,000 bonus to The Cameron, Dunn, 
Handle Co. was carried. 

SOME HINTS TO BUILDERS. 

Sash frames, with sash weights, locks 
and trim complete, may be taken out of 
old buildings that are being taken down 
and preserved just as good as new by 
screwing slats and braces on them, which 
not only keeps the frame square, but pre- 
vents the glass from being broken. 

Doors, frames, and trims may also be 
kept in good order until used, by taking 
the same precautions as in window 
frames. Old scantlings and joists should 
have all nails drawn or hammered in be- 
fore piling away. Counters, shelving, 
drawers and other store-fittings should 
be kindly dealt with. They will be want- 
ed sooner or later. 

Old flooring can seldom be utilized, 
though I have seen it used for tempor- 
ary purposes, such as fencing, covering 
of verandah floors while finishing work 
or plastering, etc. As a rule, however, 
it does not pay to take it up carefully 
and preserve it. Conductor pipes, me- 
talic cornices, and sheet metal work gen- 
erally, can seldom be made available a 
second time, though all is worth caring 
for, as some parties may use it for re- 
pairs. 

Gas fixtures should be cared for and 
stowed away in some dry place. They 
can often be made available and are not 
easily renovated if soiled or tarnished. 

Sinks, wash-basins, bath-tubs, traps, 
heating appliances, grates, mantels and 
hearth-stones should be moved with care. 
They are always worth money and may 
be used in many places as substitutes for 
more inferior fixings.— National Builder. 






RUSSIA IRON 

is almost out of the market ; not quite ; 
98 per cent of the finest sheet iron is 
Wood's Patent-Planished. 

Some think one is as good as the 
other; some favor Wood's; and some 
favor Russia. 

We make Wood's. 

Quick service. 

Return a whole sheet for an inch 
of fault. 

American Sheet Steel Company, New York 

Representatives for Canada 

B. & S. H. Thompson & Company 

53 St. Sulpice Street 

Montreal 



56 



BUILDERS' AND CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 



Htrdwm 



9 and 
Metal 



Don't Forget the Name. . . 

NEWMANS INVINCIBE 

FLOOR SPRINCS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 
Will close a door against any pressure of wind. 
Far ahead of ordinary door springs, pneumatic 
or otherwise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN ft SONS. Birmingham. 




LET THERE BE LIGHT! 

—and the best light at that. 

The Ormsby Skylight 

—dust proof, wind proof, rain pi oof, is the 
best skylight made, and the skylight is for 
many purposes the best system of admitting 
daylight. 

Learn more about the Ormsby Skylight. 
Write for information. 

4. B. ORMSBY £> CO., 

Cor. Queen and George Streets, 
TORONTO, ONT. 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in Hardware and Metal. 




Write for free samples. 
Agents being placed in every district 



Arrow Brand Asphalt Ready Roofing 

Easy to lay— lasts long— needs no painting, as it comes in rolls 
already surfaced with gravel. 

A. C. JENKINQ, Sole Selling Agents, 
Room 215 Corlstlne Building, - - MONTREAL. 




Will Hold Dp a Shelf ! 

That's what a shelf, bracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be Nothing Bet 
tbr, Nothing Cheaper than the BRADLEY 
STEEL BRACKET. It is well Japanned. Strong 
and Light. The saving in freight is a good profit, 
aside from the lower price at which the goods are 
sold. Order direct or through your jobber. 

ATLAS MFC. CO., 

New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 



The Grey and Bruce Portland 
Cement Company of Shallow 
Lake, Limited, 

Manufacturers of 

"Hercules" and "Lion" Brands 

of 

PORTLAND CEHENT 

Unsurpassed for Sidewalks, Floors, and all 

work requiring the Highest Grade 

of Portland Cement. 

HEAD OFFICE : OWEN SOUND. 



MADE IN EN LAND 

rtl^K SAW Bl -/»Of c 

»" MADE BY *-»0 

CHAS. BAYNES 
KNUZDEN BROOK 



THE "SUN" BRAND PORTLAND CEMENT. 

We make only one quality and that the best. 
Ask us for quotations. 

The Sun Portland Cement Co., Limited 

OWEN SOUND 
Jas. A Cline, Managing Director. 

The Hanover Portland Cement Co., Limited 

HANOVER, ONTARIO. 

Saugeen Brand" 



Manufacturers of *i 
the Celebrated 



OF PORTLAND CEMENT. 



Prices on application. 



"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn ' 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

Cables — Emlyn Engineering Works 

Machinery," Newport. Newpokt, Mon., England 



...THE... 

Bennett Manufacturing Co. 

Bennett's Patent Shelf Box and Cabinets 

for Hardware, Grocery, Seed and 

Drug Trades, etc. 

Owing to 
the steady 
and rapid 
growth of 
ourbusiness 
new quar- 
ters were 
needed. 

Address all communications to our New Factory : 

Pickering, Ontario 





II 



FLAT— SPIRAL QR VOLUTC 



INTERESTING CATALOG MAILED ON APPLICATION 

THE WALLACE BARNES CO. 

BRISTOL CONN. 



The Saw That Sells Itself. 



When placed in the hands of the intelligent mechanic the ATKINS 
Steel Hand Saw sells itself. You simply show it and the saw does the 



ATKINS High GradeSilver 
rest. 



ATKINS Silver Steel Hand Saws with Perfection Handles are warranted 
the FINEST Saws on earth in material, temper, grinding and finish. 



Write for Catalogue and Prices. 

E. C. ATKINS & CO. 

H. P, HUBBARD, Sales Agent for Canada. 

Toronto Office; 30 Front St. East. Tel, Main 1896 





ATKINS 
ALWAYS AHEAD 

Leading San and Tool Manufacturers 

Factories : INDIANAPOLIS, IN D. 
Northwestern Branch: Minneapolis, Minn. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Highest quality only gives satisfaction, and that is what 




HENRY BOKER'S 

FORGED ANVILS do 



Be sure to get quotations on same from your wholesale hard 
ware dealer, before you place an order. 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



January 8, 1904. 

These prices are tor such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices, lhe 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

TIN. 

I mnW and Flat; and Straits — 

' B6 and 2Mb. ingots, 100 lb. *29 50 «30 50 

TINPLATES. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright. 

M.L.S., equal to Bradley- Per box. 

I C, usual sizes *° gjj 

IXX - ' «* 

Famous, equal to Bradley— 

!xx 9 ?* 

Raven and Vulture Grades- 

I C, usual sizes * jjjj 

IXX " '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'■'.'■ '.'■'.'■ 6 50 

IXXX " '■'■'■'■ 7 50 

"Dominion Crown Best "—Double 

Coated, Tissued. p el . box. 

1C 550 

tv- 6 50 

I x x '■' * 

'• Allaway's Best "—Standard Quality. 

IC *™ 

IX 5§0 

I X X • • ■ 6 °° 

Coke Plates— Bright. 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C., usual size, 14x20 3 fo 

I.C., special sizes, base 3 90 

20x28 ' "5 

Charcoal Plates— Teme. 
Dedii or J. G. Grade— 

I C , 20x28, 112 sheets .... 6 75 7 oO 

IX., Terne Tin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Builer Plates. 
Cook ley Grade— 

X X, 14x56, 50 sheet bxs. ) 
" 14x60, " \ ■ ■■ ? W 

" 14x65, " 1 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 7 50 

r ' 26 " 8 00 

IKON AND STEEL. 

Common bar, per 100 lh 2 00 

Refined " " 2 40 

Horseshoe Iron " ' 4U 

Hoop steel, H to 3-in. baHe 2 90 

Sleigh shoe steel, " •• "" J JO 

Tire steel 230 250 

Reeled machinery 3 00 

Toe calk steel 285 300 

T. Firth&Co. stool steel, peril) 12 J 13 

.lessop's tool steel 014 

Morton's tool steel 121 13 

Black Diamond and "B.C." 

tool steel 10 11 

Chas. Leonard's tool steel. . . . 08 09 

Jonas & Colvers tool steel .... 10 20 

" Air Hardening" ... 70 

Drill steel, peril) 08 10 

Russia Iron 

fi<-nuine 11 

Imitation Doni. Crown 06 

STEEL BOILER PLATE. 

Hn 2 50 2 60 

3-16 in 260 2 70 

J in. and thicker 2 50 2 60 



BABBIT METAL. 



27 
21 
111 
23 



"Tandem," A per lb. 

B " 

C " 

Frictionless Metal ' 

Syracuse Smelting Works : 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Government, " 44 

Tough, " 40 

Hard, " 40 

Dynamo 30 

Special 25 

Harmony 22 

Car Box 20 

Extra 15 

The Canada Metal Co. : 

Imperial, genuine 40 

Metallic 30 

Hercules 20 - 

Star 15 

No. 1 12 

No. 2 10 

No. 3 06 

No. 4 05 

Geo. Langwell & Son. 

No. 1 08 

No. 2 07 

No. 3 054 

Extra 09} 

BLACK SHEETS. 

Montreal. Toronto 

10 and 16 gauge 2 25 2 55 

18 gauge 2 30 2 60 

20 " 2 30 2 60 

22 to 24 gauge 2 35 2 70 

26 " 2 40 

28 2 40 

COPPER WIRE. 
Discount, 50 per cent. 

CANADA PLATES 

Ordinary 

All bright 

Galvanized Canada Plates- 
Ordinary. 

18x24x52 4 25 

" 60 4 50 

20x28x80 8 50 

" 94 9 00 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. 
Fleur-de-Lis. Comet Bell. 

16 gauge 3 65 

18 to 24 gauge . . 3 75 3 75 3 75 
26 " . . 4 00 4 00 3 90 

28 " .. 4 25 4 25 4 05 

American brands, #4.40 for 28 gauge. 
Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 

CHAIN. 
Proof coil, 3-16 in., per J00 lb. 

5-16 
"| " . 

•• 7-16 |; 

9-16 •• :: 



Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, discount 

35 p.c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

COPPER. 

Ingot. Per 100 lb. 

Casting 13 50 14 00 

Bars. 
Out leugths, round, } to 2 in. . 23 00 25 00 
round and square, 
1 to 2 inches.... 23 00 25 00 



2 80 
2 90 


2 65 

3 50 


Dom. 

Crown. 

4 35 

4 60 

8 70 

9 20 


Queen's 
Head 


> 405 
) 4 25 
• 4 50 


e'io 

4 70 
400 
3 80 
3 70 
3 55 
3 35 
3 30 



Sheet. 
Plain, 16 oz., 14x48 and 14x60 ... 20 00 

Plain, 14 oz., 2100 

Tinned copper sheet 24 00 . 

Planished 32 00 

Braziers' (in sheets). 

4x6 ft., 25 to 30 lb. each, per lb 22 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 21 

" 50-lb. and above " .... 20 

BOILER AND T.K. PITTS. 

Plain tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 

BRASS. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 per cent 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 23 

Tubing, base, per lb 231 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 6 00 6 25 

Domestic " " 

ZINC SHEET. 

5-cwt. casks 6 15 6 50 

Part casks 6 50 7 00 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 3 20 3 30 

Bar, per lb 05 

Sheets, 2} lb. sq. ft., by roll 06J 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 06 

Note.— Cut sheets }c. per lb., extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists at 7c. 
per lb. and 35 p.c iis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths, lists at 8c. 

ANTIMONY. 

Cookson's per lb. 7 50 8 00 

SHOT. 
Common, $6.50 per 100 lb.; chilled, 87.00 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 17} p.c. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms, 3 p.c. cash, freights equalized. 

PLUMBING GOODS. 

BATH TUBS. 

Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 20 per cent, off revised list. 

BATHS. 
Standard Enameled. 

5}-f t. rolled rim, 1st quality 23 00 

5} " " "2nd " 20 00 

closets. Net. 

Plain York or Ontario Syphon Jet. . . $9 60 

Emb. " " " 10 20 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Simplex Syphon Jet 9 00 

Emb. " " " . . 7 50 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic, plain . . 6 00 

Low " " emb... 6 50 

Plain Richelieu 4 25 

Emb. " 4 50 

Connections 1 25 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins, P.O., 14-in 63 

Basins, oval, 17 x 14-in 1 50 

Basins, " 19 x 15-in 2 0o 

IRON PIPE. 
Black pipe— Per 100 feet. 

' inch 3 25 

2 30 2 3C 

" 2 55 2 55 

l " 2 85 2 85 

> " 3 65 3 65 

1 " 5 20 

1} " 7 35 

11 " 8 95 

2 " 12 55 

21 " 19 25 

3 " 22 75 

3} " 28 75 

4 " 35 25 

4} " 4100 

.-, " 44 00 

A " 57 50 

58 



Galvanized pipe — 

i inch 3 20 

f " 3 45 

i " 3 90 

I " 5 00 

1 " 7 20 

1} " 10 05 

l| " 12 20 

2 " 16 85 

Malleable Fittings— Discount 15 p.c. 

Cast Iron Fittings— 

On unions, 55 per cent. ; on nipples, 60 per 

cent.; headers and flanged unions, 52} per 
cent.; bushings, plugs and other than stand- 
ard 57} per cent. 

PLUMBERS' BRASS GOODS. 

Standard Compression work, dis. 60 per cent 
Cushion work, discount 50 per cent. 
Fuller work, discount 65 per cent. 

6 dozen lots and over of the above, extra dis- 
count 10 per cent. 

Lever handle Stops and Waste, discount 60 

per cent. With, in lots of 2 dozen and over. 

an extra discount of 10 per cent. 
Globe, Angle and Check Valves, discount 

55 per cent. 
Standard Globe, Angle and Check Valves. 

discount 60 per cent. 
J. M. T. Radiator Valves discount 55 per cent. 
Standard Radiator Valves, discount 60 per 

cent. 
Patent Quick - Opening Valves, discount 6i 

per cent. 

No. 1 compression bath cork net 1 75 

No. 4 " " " 2 00 

No. 7 Fuller's " 3 20 

No. 4}, " " 2 35 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

cock, hot and cold per doz. 15 00 

Patent Compression Cushion, bath 

cock, No. 2208 2 25 

Square head brass cocks, discount 55 percei t 

" " iron " " 50 to 60 " 

Competition Globe, Angle and Check Valvo 

discount 65 per cent. 
Thompson Smoke-test Machine $25.00 

RANGE BOILERS. 

Dominion, 30 gallon net 5 50 

35 " " 6 50 

40 " " 7 50 

Ronald's Galvanized, 30 gallon, ' 7 40 

35 " " 8 40 
40 " " 9 60 

Copper, 30 gallon " 22 00 

r ' 35 " " 24 00 

" 40 " " 28 

Discount off copper boilers 15 per cent. 
SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS 
Light soil pipe, discount, 45 and 5 per cent . 
" " fittings, discount 50 and 5 p.c 
Med. and Extra heavy pipe and fittings, dis. 55 
and 5 per cent. 

7 and 8-in. pipe, discount 40 and 5 per cent. 

SOLDER. Per lb 

Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed — 19 

Bar, half-and-half, commercial 18 

Refined 18 

Wiping 17 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

BLUESTONE. 

Casks, for SDraying 5 50 

100-lb. lots do per lb 04 

COLORS IN OIL. 
25-lb. tins. Standard Quality. 

Venetian red, per lb 03} 05 

Chrome yellow . 12 14 

Golden ochre 07 10 

French " 06 

Marine black 04 

Chrome green 10 

Freuch Imperial green 14 

Signwriters' black 016 

Umber 04 06 

Sienna 04 07 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



WADE & BUTCHER'S 

"SPECIAL" Razors 

Are unequalled for quality and finish. 

JAMES HUTTON <£ CO., - MONTREAL 

Sole Agents for Canada 



COLORS, DRY. 

Common ochre, bbls 1 15 1 30 

YeUow ochre (J.F.L.S) bbls., .... 2 00 

Brussels ochre 2 00 

Venetian red, bhl 150 2 25 

English oxides, per cwt 3 00 3 25 

American oxides, bbls 1 25 2 75 

Canadian oxides, bbls 1 25 1 75 

Super magnetic oxides, 93 p.c. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" umber, " "... 08 10 

Raw umber 08 10 

Drop black, pure 10 

Chrome yellow, pure 18 

Chrome greens, pure per lb . . 09 10 

Golden ochre 03 04 

Ultramarine blue, in 28-lb. 

boxes, per lb 06 12 

Fire proof mineral, per 100 lb 1 00 

Genunie En,'. Litharge, per lb — 07 

Mortar color, per 100 lb 1 25 1 & 

Pure Indian red, No. 45, lb. . 08 1) 

Whiting (common), bbl 55 8 'i0 

English vermilion in 30-lb. bgs. . . 85 

CASTOR OIL. 

British, 1st qua!, in cases.perlb 084 095 

" '' small lots .... 10 104 

COD OIL, ETC. 

Ood oil, per gal 50 55 

Pure olive 1 40 

" neatsfont 90 

WHITE LEAD. Per 100 lb. 

Pure 4 75 

No. 1 4 50 

No. 2 425 

No. 3 3 87J 

No. 4 3 50 

Munro's Select Flake White 4 75 

Elephant and Decorators'Pure — 4 75 

Decorator's Pure 4 75 

SterlingPure 5 00 

Island City Pure 5 00 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 4 75 5 00 

Ramsay's Exterior 4 50 4 75 

RED LEAD. 



Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt §4 25 
Genuine. 100 lb. kegs, 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 

No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 

WHITE ZINC. 

Extra Red Seal 06 

FrenchV.M 06 

Lehigh 06 

DRY WHITE LEAD. 



Pure, casks . 
Pure, kegs... 
No. 1, casks 
No. 1, kegs.. 



PREPARED PAINTS 

In i, J and 1-gallon tins. 



Pure, per gallon 

Second qualities, per gallon . . 

Barn (in bbls.) 

The Sherwin-Williams paints 

Canada Paint Co.'s pure 

Toronto Lead & Color Cos pure 
Sanderson Pearcy's pure — 
Standard Co.'s "New Era.".. 

" Globe " barn 

Francis-Frost Co.'s "Ark" B'd 

" British Navy deck 

Henderson & t'otts's "Anchor" 

Globe Paint Co.'s mixed 

" barn and bridge 

Ramsay's paints, Pure, per gal. 

Thistle, " 

" Outside, bbls 

Island City House Paint — 

Floor " .... 

Sterling House Paint 

Floor " 

National 



$4 50 
•4 75 
4 00 
4 25 



08 
06} 
06} 



4 50 
4 75 
4 25 

4 50 



1 20 
1 00 

90 

1 40 
1 25 
1 25 
1 20 
1 30 

70 
1 25 
1 50 
1 35 
1 30 

75 

1 20 
1 00 

65 

1 25 
1 25 
1 20 
I 10 
I 05 



PUTTY. 

Bulk in bbls 2 05 

Bulk in less quantity 2 25 

Bladders in bbls 2 2D 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose 2 40 

25-lb. tins 2 25 

1251b. tins 2 50 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 100 lb. 2 50 
VARNISHES. 

In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. Net. 

Carriage, No. 1 1 50 1 60 

Pale durable body 4 10 4 25 

rubbing 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, japan 1 50 1 60 

No. 1 brown japan 85 90 

Elastic oak 1 50 

Furniture, extra 1 10 1 25 

No. 1 90 100 

Hard oil finish I 35 1 50 

Lightoilfinish 160 170 

Damat 175 2 00 

Shellac, white 2 40 2 50 

orange 2 30 2 40 

Turpentine, brown japan 1 10 1 20 

" black japan 1 10 I 20 

No. 1. 85 90 

Elastilite varnish, 1 gal. can, each. . 2 00 

Granitine floor finish, per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels ; size 1, $1.20 ; 

size 2, 70c. ; size 3, 40c. each. 
Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish, assorted 
case, from to 1 gal., $2.50. 

GLUE. 

Common 08 085 

French medal 10 14 

White, extra 18 22 

Gelatine 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 

Ground 12 16 

Cologne, genuine 

HARDWARE. 

AMMUNITION. 
Cartridges. 

B. B. Caps Dominion, 50 and 5 per cent. 

Rim Fire Pistol, discount 40 p.c, American. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dominion, 50 and 5 p.c. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, 10 p.c, Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Domin- 
ion, 30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dominion, 15 per cent. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer- 
ican, add 5 per cent, to list. B.B. Caps, 
discount 40 per cent., American. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
" Domiuion " grades, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 per cent, advance on list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 per cent.; American, $1.60. 

Wads. per lb. 

Best thicK white felt wadding, in }- 

bags $ 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

4-lb. bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 
Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 25 

Rest thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge e 25 

rhin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

<*anh. 8 autre 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 ( ac'i— Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7 and 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " 110 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, is 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 " 1 65 

5 and 6 " 1 90 

59 



ADZES. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

ANVILS. 

Wrights, 80-lb. and over 10! 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 091 

Brook's, 80-lb. and over 11} 

AUGERS. 
Gilmour'8, discount 65 and 5 per cent, off list. 

AXES. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 7 00 10 00 

Double bit, " 10 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes 6 25 7 00 

Splitting Axes 7 00 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 53 10 00 

AMERICAN AXE AND TOOL CO. 

Red Ridge, boys', handled. 5 75 

hunters 5 25 

AXLE GREASE 

Ordinary, per gross 5 7a 6 00 

Best quality 13 00 15 00 

BELLS. 

Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

Cow. 
American make, discount 63§ per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 

Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 46 per cent. 

Farm. 
American, each 1 25 3 00 

House. 
American, per lb 35 40 

BELLOWS. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Mouldere', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount '0 oer cent 

BELTING. 
Extra, 60 per cent. 
Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 
No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 per 

cent. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 per cent. 

BITS. 

Auger. 
Gilmour'8, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 

Car. 
Gilmour's, 474 to 50 per cent. 
Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BLIND AND BED 8TAPLES. 

All sizes, per lb 07| 12 

bolts and nuts Per cent- 

Carriage Bolts, common (SI list) 

" 3-16 and} 60 

" 3-16 and | 55 and 5 

" " 7-16 and up 55 

" full sq. ($2.40 list) 60 
" Norway Iron ($3 

list) 60 

Machine Bolts, all sizes, jj and 

less 60 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up 55 and 5 

Plough Bolts i . . 55 and 5 

Blank Bolts 55 and 5 

Bolt Ends 55 and 5 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 70 

Coach Screws, cone point 70 

Nuts, square, ad sizes, 4c. per lb. off. 

Nuts, hexagon, a'l sizes, 4}c. per lb. oft. 
Stove Rods, per lb., 54 to 6c 

BOOT CALKS. 

Small and medium, ball per M. 4 25 

Small heel " i 50 

BRIOHT WIRE GOODS 

Discount 624 Per cent. 



BROILERS. 

Light, discouut 65 to 675 P er cent. 
Reversible, discount 65 to 675 per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., discount 374 per cent. 

Henis, No. 8 per doz 6 00 

Hen is, No. 9 " .... 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 

BUTCHERS' CLEAVERS. 

German per doz. 6 00 1100 

American " 12 00 20 00 

BUTCHER KNIVES. 

Baileys per doz. 60 6 30 

BUILDING PAPER, FTC. 

Tarred Felt, per 100 lb 1 85 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 lb. 

per roll 90 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 65 lb., 

per roll 1 15 

Carpet Felt per ton 45 0& 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 35 00 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 40 

Tar " " 400 " 50 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 55 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 65 

O. K. &I. X. L.... " 400 " 70 

Resin-Bized " 400 " 45 

Oiled Sheathing.... " 600 '.' 100 

Oiled " .... " 400 " 70 

Roof Coating, in barrels per gal. 17 

Roof " small packages " 25 

Refined Tar per barrel 5 00 

Coal Tar " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

Roofing Pitch per 100 lb. 110 

BULL RINGS. 

Copper, $2.00 for 25-inch, and $1.90 'or 2-innh. 

BUTTS. 

Wrought Brass, net revised list 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, discount. 60 per cent 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, discount 65, 10 and 25 per cent. 
Loose Pin, discount 65, 10 and 24 per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, discouut 70, 70 and5 percent 
Gen. B ronzed per pair 40 65 

CARPET 8TRETCHER8. 

American per doz. 100 150 

Bollard's " 6 50 

CASTORS. 

Bed, new list, discount 55 to 575 per cent. 
Plate, discount 525 to 575 Pe r cent. 

CATTLE LEADERS. 
Nos. 32 and 33 per gross 7" 50 8 50 

CHALK. 

Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump per cwt. 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon per gross 14 18 

CHISELS. 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad s, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 
Warnock's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
P. S. & W. Extra, discount 60 and 10 per cen 

CHURN 

Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8 
No. 1, $8.50 ; No. 2, $9.00 ; No. 3, $10.00 
No. 4, $12.00 ; No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto 
wood frames. 20c. each less than the above 
Discounts: Factories, 30 and 30 per cent 
f.o.b.Ottawa, Kingston and Montreal, 40 and 
15 per cent. Terms 4 mouths or 3 per cent, 
cash in 30 days. 

Churn frames, including bearings, levers, eto. 
Nos. 0, 1, 2 and 3, wood, $2.40; and 4 and 
5, $2.65. Metal franiPS, 25c. extra. Dis- 
count 15 per cent., net 30 days. 

CLIPS. 

Axle, discount 65 per cent. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



44 Same Quality as Last" 

These are the words used by our old customers when ordering more goods, and their meaning 
is easily understood. 

Our Building Papers, Roofing Felts and Wire Edged Ready Roofing are made to give 
satisfaction to the User, and those are the kind of goods the Dealer wants. 



The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 



Toron-to arid IVIon-tri 



COMPASSES, DIVIDERS, ETC. 

American, discount 62£ to 65 per cent. 

CONDUCTOR PIPE 

Plain or Corrugated. 

2-inch per 100 feet 3 00 

J " " " 4 00 

4 " " " 5 25 

5 " " " 6 75 

6 " " " 900 

CRADLES, (1RAIN. 

Canadian, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

CROSSCUT SAW HANDLES. 

S. k D., No. 3 per pair 174 

S. &D., " 5 r ' 22J 



S. &D., " B. 
Boynton pattern. 



15 
ft 20 



DOOR SPRINGS. 

Torrey s Rod per doz 80 

Coil, 9 to 11 in " 95 165 

English " 2 00 4 00 

DRAW KNIVES 

Coach and Wagon, discount 50 and 10 pe 

cent. 
Carpenters discount 60 and 10 per o«nt. 

DRILLS. 
Hand and Breast 
Millar s Palls, per doz., net list. 

DRILL BITS. 

Morse, discount 374 to 40 per cent 
Standard, discount 50 aud 5 to 55 per cent . 

FAUCETS. 
Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per cent. 

EAVETROUQHS. 

10 inch per 100 ft. 

elbows (stovepipe.) 

aud 6-inch, common per doz. 

7-inch 

Polished, 15c. pel dozen extra. 
ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount 40 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY .MILK rlM 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent 
files \ni> R V.SPs 

i ircat Western 70 and It) per cent 

A rcade 70 

Kearney & Foot . . 



10 



1 2U 
1 35 



Disston's 70 

American 70 

.1. Barton Smith 70 

McClellan 70 

Eagle 70 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and o 

Royal 80 

Globe 70 to 75 

Black Diamond. 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 per 

cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to iV. per cent. 
Nicholson File Co.'s "Simplicity" rile handle, 

per gross 85c. to si. 50 

GLASS. 

Window. Box Price, 

star D. Diamond 

Si/.e United Per Per Per Per 
[nones. 50ft. 100ft 50 f1 lOOft. 

Under 26 

26 to 40 

11 to 50 

:>l to 60 

61 to 70 

71 to 80 

81 to 85 

86 to 1U 

!'l to-95 

96 to hid 

A (lis ount of 25 . 
" Double Diamond, 



3 10 


« 75 


3 30 


7 25 


3 70 


8 75 


1 mi 


10 00 


5 HO 


ii ;. 


5 30 


12 50 




14 00 


■ 


16 50 




18 00 




20 00 


pi i cent, i' o 


tiered on 



GAUGES. 






Marking, Mortise, 


Etc. 




Stanleys discount 50 to 55 per 


cent. 




Wire Gauges. 






Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33 . . . .each 


1 65 


2 40 


HALTERS. 






Rope, 2-inch per gross 

Rope, | " " 

Rope, | to i-inch " 

Leather, 1-inch per doz. 

Leather, 1} " " 

Web " 


3874 
5 15 

1 87 


9 00 
14 00 

4 00 

5 20 
245 


HAMMERS. 






Nail. 






Maydole's, discount 5 to 10 per 
discount 25 to 27i per cent 


sent. Canadian 


Tack. 






Magnetic per doz. 


1 10 


1 20 


Sledge. 






Canadian per lb. 


07J 


084 


Ball Pean. 






English and Canadian, per lb. 


22 


25 


HANDLES. 






Axe, 2nd growth, per doz. net 


3 00 
1 00 


4 00 

1 .50 


Fork. 






C ft B , discount 40 per cent., 


revised 


list. 


Hoe 






C. ft B., discount 40 per cent., 


revised 


list. 


Saw. 








1 00 


1 25 


Plane. 








3 15 


3 75 


Hammer aud Hatchet. 




Canadian, discount 40 per cent 






Cross-Cut Saws 










13j 



HANtJERS. do/., pans. 

Steel barn door 6 0J 8 00 

Stearns, 4-inch 4 50 

5-inch 6 00 

Zenith '.I 00 

Lane's covered- 
No. 11, 5-foot run 8 40 

No. 114, 10-foot run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-foot run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-foot run 21.00 

Steel, covered 4 CO 1100 

" track, 1 x 3-16 in 3 90 

" ljx3-16in 5 60 

HARVEST TOOLS. 

Discount 80 per cent. 

HATCHETs. 

Canadian, discount 10 to 424 per cent. 

HAT ENAMEL. 
Henderson .^ Potts' "Anchor Brand 
II I NOES 

Blind, Parker's, discount 16$ percent. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 064 

5-in., " 06f 

6-iu., ' 06 

8-in., " 05} 

10-in., " 05 J 

Light T and strap, discount 65 and 5 per cent. 

Screw book and hinge 

6 to 10 in per lOiLlb 4 50 

12 in. up " .... 3 25 

Spring, No. 20. per gro. pairs — 10 50 
HOES. 

Garden, Mortar, etc., discount 60 per cent. 

Planter per doz. 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE. 

Discount 45 and 5 per cent 

BOOKS 

• Cast Iron 

Birdcage per doz. 50 110 



Clothes line, No. 61 . " 00 . 70 

Harness " 60 12 00 

Hat and coat per gro. 1 10 10 00 

Chandelier per doz. 50 1 00 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought hooks and staples Canadian dis- 
count 474 per cent. 

Wire. ' 
Hat and coat, discount 45 per cent. 

Belt per 1,000 .... 60 

Screw, bright, discount 55 per cent. 

HORSE NAILS. 

"C brand, 40, 10 and 74 per cent, off list I Oval 
"M" brand, 55, per cent. Ihead 

Jouutersunk, 55 per cent. 
"Monarch," 50 and 1\ per cent. 
' ' Peerless " 50 per cent. dis. 

HORSESHOES. 

Ft) B. Montreal 

No. 2 No. 1 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 
Light, medium and heavy. ... 3 65 3 90 

Snow shoes 3 90 4 15 

Steel Shoes. 

XL, sizes 1 to 5 5 35 

Light. No. 2 and larger 3 80 

No. 1 and smaller 4 06 

Featherweight, all sizes to 4. ... 5 35 

Toeweight, all sizes 1 to 4 fi 60 

IAPANNED WARE. 

Discount, and 5 per cent, off list, June 1899 

ice PICKS. 
Star per doz. 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 

Brass spun 74 per cent, discount off new list. 

Copper per lb. 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 per cent 

KEVS. 

Lock, Canadian dis. 40 to 40 and 10 per cent. 
Cabinet, trunk and padlock, 
American per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berliu per doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine .... " 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. & L. 

screw per gross 1 30 4 00 

White door knobs per doz 100 

HAY. KNIVES 

Net prices. 

LAMP WICKS 

Discount. 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS 

Cold Blast per doz. 7 00 

No. 3, "Wright's" " 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner. ... " 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast " 9 00 

No. " 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per do/., extra. 

LEMON scjI'KEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 1 87 3 85 

King, wood " 2 75 2 90 

King, glass " 4 00 4 50 

All glass " 50 90 

LINES 

Fish per gross 1 05 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LAWN MOWERS. 

Woodyatt, 12-in. wheel 8 50 

Star " 6 25 

Daisy " (net) 2 45 

Philadelphia, 12-in. wheel 7 00 

Ontario. " 14 25 

King Edward, 12 in 9 00 

Discount, 50 per cent., with freight conces 
sions in quantity shipments. 

Maxwelkt Sons: 

lO'/.-in. high wheel 7 50 10 00 

9-in 5 50 6 25 

8-in 49 5 50 

Discount 50 per cent. 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, 40 to 40 and 10 per ceut. 
Russell & Erwin per doz. 3 00 3 25 

60 



Cabinet. 
Eagle, discount 30 per cent. 

Padlocks. 

English and Am per doz. .50 6 00 

Eagle, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 

Iron and Brass. 
Flat head, discount 25 per cent. 
Round head, discount 20 per cent 

MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' per doz. 1 25 1 50 

Carpenters', hickory, " 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae " 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 060 200 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian per doz. 5 50 6 50 

MEAT CUTTERS. 

American, discount 33i per cent 
German, 15 per cent. 

Gem each I 15 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS 
Discount 25 per cent. 

NAILS. Cut. Wire 

2d and 3d 3 45 3 45 

3d 3 10 3 12 

4 and 5d 2 85 2 95 ' 

6 and 7d 2 75 2 80 

8 and 9d 2 60 2 60 

10 and 12d 2 55 2 55 

16and20d 2 50 2 50 

30, 40, 50 aud 60d (base) 2 4.= 5 45 

Cut nails in carlots 5c. less. 

Wire nails in carlots are $2.40. 

Steel cut nails 10c. extra. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, discount lb per >-»nt 

Coopers' nails, discount 30 per cent 

NAIL PULLERS 

German and American 1 75 50 

NAIL SETS, 

Square, round and octagon, 

per gross 3 38 

Diamond 100 2 

POULTRY NETTING. 

2-in. Mesh, 19 w.g., dis. 60 per cent. 
2-in. Mesh, 16 w.g. and heavier, .50 p.c. 

OAKUM. 

U . S Navy per 100 lb 6 75 

Plumbers " 3 00 

OILERS 

Mct'lary s Model galvanized 

oil cau, with Dump, 5 gallon, 

per dozen 10 00 

Zinc and tin, discount 50, 50 and 10 per cent 

Copper per doz. 1 25 3 50 

Brass " 1 50 S 50 

Malleable, discount 25 per cent 

uALVAN'IZED PAILS. 
Dutfelin pattern pails, discount 45 per rf-' 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized wasntubs, discount 45 per cent 

PIECED WARE 

Discount 40 per cent off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sail buckets, discount 40 per cent 
6, 10 and 14-rit Haling pails, dis. 40 per cen' 
Creamer cans, discount 40 per cent. 

PICKS. 

Per dozen 6 no 9 oo 

PICTURE NAILS 

Porcelain head per gross 1 35 1 50 

Brass bead " 40 1 00 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 percent. 
PINE TAR. 

'.pint in tins per gross ... 7 80 

I" " " .... 9 60 

PLANES. 

Wood bench, Canadian discount 40 per cent., 

American discount 50 per cent. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American, 374 to 

40 per cent. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



^P for big game shooting is half sold before it is offered by the retailer. This is due to the long-standing ^P 

^B reputation and the thorough advertising behind it. ^B 

$ U. M. C. IS EASY TO SELL. NEW CATALOGUE. £ 

The Union Metallic Cartridge Co. 



AGENCY, 313 BROADWAY, N.Y. 



FACTORY, BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 



DEPOT, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PLANE IKONS 
English per do/.. 2 00 5 00 

I'LIEltS A-ND NIPPERS. 

Buttons genuine, per doz. pairs, discount 
37i to 40 per cent. 

Button's imitation perdoz. 5 UO MOO 

German " 60 6U 

PRESSED SPIKKS 

Discount 20 per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse perdoz. 55 100 

Axle " 22 33 

Screw " 27 1 0U 

Awning " 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 1 80 ;> 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers perdoz. 1 0U 185 

Conductors " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners', solid per set 72 

hollow per inch — 100 

RAKES. 

Wood per doz. net 1 20 up. 



RAZORS. 



per doz. 

4 00 18 00 



4 00 


18 00 


7 50 


11 00 


12 50 


15 00 


3 60 


10 00 


7 00 


12 00 


6 00 


12 00 


10 00 


11 00 




15 00 




10 75 




13 00 




13 50 




'.3 50 


8 50 


10 50 



Elliot's 

Geo. Butler's & Co. 's 

Boker's 

" King Cutter 

Wade & Butcher's 

Theile& Quack s 

Bailey's 

Bailey's Brantford 

Carbo Magnetic 

Griffon Barber's Favorite 

Griffon No. 65 

Griffon Safety Razors 

Griffon Stropping Machines. . 
Lewis Bros.' " Klean Kutter" 

REGISTERS. 
Discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND RURKs. 

Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 and 

10 per cent, 
iron Burrs, discount 55 per cent. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons, 5c. 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in J-lb cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets, with usual proportion burrs, 45 

per cent, discount. Cartons, lc. per lb. 

extra, net. 
Copper Burrs only, discount 30 and 10 per cent. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets, J-Ib. 

cartons, lc. per lb. 

RIVET SETS. 

Canadian, discount 35 to 374 per cent. 

ROPE, ETC. 

Sisal Hi 

Pure Manilla 144 

"British" Manilla 12 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 00 

" 5-32 inch 00 

J inch 00 

Russia Deep Sea 15 

Jute 08 

Lath Yam, single 11 

double Hi 

Sisal bed cord, 48 feet per doz. 65 

" 60 feet " 80 

•' 72 feet " 95 



Boxwood, discount 55 per cent. 
Ivory, discount 374 to 40 per cent. 

SAD IRONS. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished. ...per set TO 

No. 50, nickle-plated, " 80 

Common, plain 4 50 

plated 5 50 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 

B. & A. aand, discount, 40 and 5 per cent 
Emery, discount 40 per cent. 
Garnet (Rurton's), 5 to 10 per cent, advance 
OB list 



SAP SPOUTS. 

Bronzed iron with hooks . . . .per 1,000 7 50 

SAWS. 

Hand, Disston's, discount 124 per cent. 
S. & LV, discount 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's per foot 35 55 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent, on Nos. 2 and 3 

Hack, complete each 75 2 75 

" frame only 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional per 100 lb 2 25 

Solid " .... 1 75 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 22 25 

SAW sets. per doz. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets, Perfect 4 00 

X -Cut Sets, " 7 50 

SCALES. 

Gurney Standard, 40 per cent. 
Gurney Champion, 50 per cent. 
Burrow, Stewart & Milne — 

Imperial Standard, discount 40 per cent. 

Weigh Beams, discount 35 per cent. 

Champion Scales, discount 50 per cent. 
Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per cent. 

" Dominion, discount 55 per cent 

" Richelieu, discount 55 per cent. 

Warren S new Standard, discount 40 percent. 

" " Champion, discount 50 per cent. 
Weighbeams, discount 35 per cent. 
SCREW DRIVERS. 
Sargent's ...perdoz. 65 100 

SCREEN DOORS. 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 
stained, 4-in. style per doz. 6 80 

Common doors,2 or 3 panel, yellow and 
green stained, 4-in. style — perdoz. 7 00 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, in natural 
colors, oil finish per doz. 8 15 

3-in. style 20c. per dozen less. 

SCREWS. 

Wood, F. H., bright and steel, discount 87i 

per cent. 
Wood, R. H., bright, dis. 824 percent. 
" F. H., brass, dis. 80 per cent. 
R. H., " dis. 75 per cent. 
' F. H., bronze, dis. 75 per cent. 
' R. H., " dis. 70 per cent. 
Drive Screws, dis. 874 per cent. 

Bench, wood perdoz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, case hardened, dis. 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent. 

SCYTHES. 

Perdoz. net 6 00 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 

Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

SHEARS. 

Bailey Cutlery Co., full nickeled, discou 

and 24 per cent. 
Bailey Cutlery, Japan Handles, discount 671 

per cent. 
Seymour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 

Canadian, discount 45 per cent 
KINKS. 

Cast iron, 16x24 85 

18x30 100 

18x36 1 40 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, discount 25 per cent. 
Lock, Andrews' 4 50 11 50 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, 14-lb per lb 37 

2-lb. or over " .... 34 

8QUARES. 

Iron, No. 493 perdoz. 2 40 2 55 

" No. 494 " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, discount 60 to 60 and 5 per cent. 

Try and Bevel, discount 50 to 52J per cent. 
STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, discount 75 and 124 per cent, off re- 
vised list. 

Retinned. discount 75 per cent, off revised list. 

61 



STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 00 

Plain 2 80 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 per cent. 

STOCKS AND DIES. 

American discount 25 per cent. 

STONE. 

Washita per lb. 28 60 

Hindostan " 06 07 

slip " 09 09 

Labrador " 13 

" Axe " ... 15 

Turkey " .... 50 

Arkansas " 150 

Water-of-Ayr " ... 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, 2-in.,40to200 lb. .perton .... 25 00 

" under 40 lb., " .... 28 00 

" under 2 in. thick, " .... 29 00 

STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths .... 7 00 
7 inch " " .... 7 50 

KNAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 

No. 4, 3 doz. in case . . net cash 4 80 

No. 6, 3 doz. in ase.. " 8 40 

TACKS, BRADS. ETC 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 and 15 

tinned 80 and 20 

" (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only 80 

" J weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 and 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk. . . .85, 12J and 12.\ 
" brush, blued and tinned 

bulk 70 

Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 and 121 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacKs 5o 

Copper tacks 30 

Copper nails o2. 2 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and o 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails, in papers 10 

in bidk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in doz- 

ens only ™ 

Zinc gla/.i-'rs points = - 

Double pointed tacks, papers.. 90 and 10 

bulk.... 40 

Clinch and duck rivets 45 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin per doz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 7a 

(hesteruian's each 90 2 8o 

steel each 80 8 00 

tinners' snips. 
Bailey's, discount 25 per cent. 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, discount 75 to 75 and 10 
per cent. 

traps (steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, discount 25 per cent. 
Game, H. & N., P. S. & W„ 65 per cent. 
Game, steel, 724, 75 per cent. 

TROWELS. 

Disston's, discount 10 per cent. 

German perdoz. 4 75 6 00 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 19 

" " 4-ply 23 

Mattress ,....perlb. 33 45 

Staging 27 35 

VISES. 

Wright's 13* 

Brook's 12' 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

™ •• " No. 2 5 50 

Saw Vise 4 50 9 00 

Columbia Hardware Co. 
Blacksmiths' (discount) 60 percent. 

parallel (discount ) 45 per oenl 



ENAMELLED WARE. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White 
discount 50 per cent 

Diamond, Famous, Premier, discount 50 and 
10 per cent 

Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, discount 
50, 10 and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 

Smooth Steel Wire. 

No. 0-9 gauge $2 50 

10 " 6c. extra 

11 " 12c. 

12 " 20c. 

13 " 30c. 

14 " 40c. 

15 " 55c. 

16 " 70c. 

Add 60c. for coppering and $2 for tinning. 
Extra net per 100 lb. —Oiled wire 10c., 

spring wire 81.25, special hay baling wire 30c. 

best steel wire 75c. , bright soft drawn 15c, 

charcoal (extra quality) $1.25, packed in casks 

or cases 15 •., bagging and papering 10c, 50 

and 100-lb. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. bundles 

15c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in 1-lb. 

hanks, 50c, in 4-lb. hanks 75c, in J-lb. 

hanks §1. 

Fine Steel Wire, discount 25 per cent. 
List of extras: In 100-lb. lots: No. 17, 
$5-No. 18, $5.50— No. 19, $6-No. 20, $6.65— 
No. 21, .$7— No. 22, $7.30-No. 23, $7,65— No. 
24, $8-No. 25, $9 No. 26, $9.50-No. 27. 
$10— No. 28, $ll-No. 29, $12-No. 30, $13— 
No.31, $14— No. 32, $15— No. 33, $16— No. 34, 
$17. Extras net — tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, 
$2— Nos. 26-31, $4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 
5c— oiling, 10c — in 25-lb. bundles, 15c— in 5 
and 10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 25c 
—in 4-lb. hanks, 38c — in J-lb- hanks, 50c — 
packed in casks or cases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c 

Brass wire, discount 60 per cent, off the list. 

Copper wire, discount 60 per cent, net cash 
30 days, f.o.b factory. 

Galvanized wire, per 100 lb.— Nos. 4 and 5, 
$3.70 to $3.70-Nos. 6, 7, 8, $3.15 to $3.15 
- No. 9, $2.55 -- No. 10, $3.20 to *3.20 
—No. 11, $3.25 to $3 25 — No. 12, $2.6= 
-No. 13, $2.75-No. 14. $3.75 to$3.75-No 
15, $4.30— No. 16. .$4.30. Base sizes, Nos. 
6 to 9, $2,274 f.o.b. Cleveland. In carlots 
124c less. 

Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand, No. 17, 
.$4.65; No. 18. $2.90; No. 19, $2.60. Hollow 
6 strand, No. 17, $4.30; No. 18, $2.70; No. 
19, $2.35: No. 20, $2.30, f.o.b. Hamilton, 
Toronto, Montreal. 

WIRE FENGING. 

Galvanized barb 2 80 

Galvanized, plain twist 2 90 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2 554 in 
less than carlots, and $2 45 in carlots. 

COILED SPRING WIRE. 

High Oarbpn, No. 9 *2 75 

No. 11 3 40 

No. 12 2 »S 

WIRE CLOTH. 

Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft., net. . 1 50 
Terms, 3 per cent, off 30 days. 
WASHINo MACHINES 
Stephenson Washer, perdoz 45 00 

WRENCHES. 

Acme, discount 35 to 374 per cent. 
Agricultural, discount 00 percent. 

Coe's Genuine, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

Towers' Engineer each 2 00 7 00 

S perdoz. 5 80 6 00 

G.&K.'sPipe " •••• 340 

Burrell's Pipe each .... 3 00 

Pocket per doz. 2o 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader perdoz. 30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian •■■■ J* JJ» 

Royal American M ■ ■ • • « JJ{ 

Sampson ■••■ J*"" 

Lightning „ • • ■■„ . *' w 

Terms, 4 months, or 3 per cent. 30 days 

WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 

Canadian make, diseount40 per cent, 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 



Ailams Co 41 

Alabastiae 45 

American Shearer Mfg. Co 5 

American Sheet Steel Co 5C 

American Steel and Wire Co 8 

Atkins. E. C, k Co 57 

AtlasMfg.Co 57 

Bailey Cutlery Co Inside back cover 

Bank oi Commerce 52 

Bank of Toronto 52 

Barnett. G. & H. Co Outside back cover 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co 41 

Baynes Charles 57 

Bennett Mfg. Co 57 

Berlin Robe & Clothing Co 5 

Birkett, Thos.. & Son Co 2 

Bliss Mfg. Co., R 64 

Boker, H., & Co Outside front cover 58 

Bradst reet's 64 

British American Ass. Co 54 

Burman & Sons 10 

Canada Corundum Co 23 

Canada Foundry Co 21 

Canada lion Furnace Co 33 

Canada Linseed Oil Mills 43 

Canada Metal Co 21 

Canada Paint Co 46 

Canada Paper Co 23 

Canada Permanent Mort. Co 52 

Canada Screw Co 18 

Canadian Cordage and Mfg. Co . . . 11 

Canadian Rubber Co 1 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co 3J 

Cartland, J as., & Son 1 

Clare Bros. & Co 49 

Coltart & Cameron 41 

Confederation Life 52 

Connor, J. H.. & Son 64 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co 45 

Consumers' Cordage Co 4 

Covert Mfg. Co 5 

Crosby, G. A., & Co 9 



Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co 39 

Dennis Wire and Iron Co 9 

Descron'o Iron Co 33 

Dodge Mfg. Co 8 

Dods, P. D, &Co '45 

Dominion Belting Co 23 

Dom. of Can. Guarantee Co 54 

Dominion Wire Mfg. Co 8 

Donaldson, Robt., k Co 9 

Dowswell Mfg. Co 7 

Dunlop Tire Co 5 

Empire Machine & Metal Stamping Co. 21 

Erie Spacialty Co 64 

Fairbanks Co 13 

Fairgrieve Mfg. Co 11 

Gabriel & Schall 42 

Grant Hamilton Oil Co 43 

Grey & Bruce Portland Cement Co 5i 

Gibb, Alexander 33 64 

Globe Paint Co 45 

Greening, B., Wire Co 8 

Grose, Walter 34 

Guelph Waterproof Clothing Co 5 

Gurney Foundry Co , 39 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co 

Outside back cover 

Hamilton Cotton Co 9 

Hamilton Rifle Co 9 

Hamilton Stamp and Stencil Works 21 

Hanover Portland CenuntCo 57 

Harkins & Willis 41 

Harrington & Richardson Arms Co 9 

Henderson & Potts Co 44 

Heinisch, R., Sons Co 62 

Howland, H. S., Sons & Co 17 

Hutton, James, & Co 59 

Hyde, F. & Co 33 

Imperial Tea Strainer Co 41 

Ingersoll, Robt. H., & Bro 7 

Ironside, Son.& Co 9 



Jackson, C. F., & Co 34 

Jamieson, R. C, &Co 43 

Jardine, A. B., & Co 21 

Jenking, A. C 57 

John.*cn, Iver, Arms & Cycle Works . . 16 

Kay Electric Dynamo and Motor Co. . . 18 

Kemp Mfg. Co 12 

Kerr Engine Co 21 

Korn, Geo. W., Razor Mfg. Co 64 

Lamplough, F. W, & Co 23 

Langwell's Bab'ot Outside front cover 

Leslie, A. C, & Co 33 

Lewis Bros. & Co 3 

Lockerby & McComb 51 

London Rolling Mill Co 7 

Luf kin Rule Co Inside back cover 

Lysaght, John Outside front cover 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co 41 

Maxwell, D., & Co 6 

Meadows. Geo. B 9 

Metallic Roofing Co 35 

Metropolitan Bank 52 

Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co 51 

Morrow, John, Machine Screw Co 34 

MacLeanPublishingCo.inside back cover 23 

McCaskill, Dougall & Co 

Outside back cover 

McClary Mfg. Co 26 

McDougall, R.. Co 33 

McDowell, Stanley M 40 

Newman. W., & Sons 57 

Nicklin, John, & Co 49 

North Bros. Mfg. Co 1 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co 33 

Oakey, John, & Sons 23 

Oneida Community 5 

Ontario Silver Co 62 

Ontario Tack Co 14 



Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co. 
Ormsby, A. B., & Co 



62 

57 

Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Co 7 

Page Wire Fence Co 51 

Paterson Mfg. Co 60 

Peck Rolling Mills Co 26 

Phillips, Charles D 57 

Pullman Mnfg. Co 62 

Queen City Oil Co 45 

Ramsay, A.. & Son 49 

Rice Lewis & Son Inside front cover 

Russell & Erwin Mfg. Co 2 

Salyerds, E. B 62 

Samuel, M. & L. , Benjamin, & Co 2 

Sell's Commercial 9 

Sessenwein Bros 34 

Seymour. Henry T., Shear Co 62 

Sherwin-Williams Co 14 

Smith & Hemenway Co 62 

Solarine Metal Polish 5 

Standard Paint and Varnish Works. . .. 45 

Sterne, G. F 41 

Sun Portland Cement Co 57 

Sutherland, D 40 

Syracuse Smelting Works 21 

Taylor-Forbes Co 12 

Toronto General Trusts 52 

Thompson, B. & S. H, Co 

Outside back cover 

Thome. RE 45 

Trees, Samuel. & Co S 

Union Metallic Cartridge Co 61 

Wallace-Barnes Co 57 

Walter, E. F, &Co 6 

Warnock, James, & Co 18 

Western Assurance Co 54 

Western Foundry Co Inside back cover 

Wright, E. T., & Co 40 






ONTARIO SILVER CO., 

Limited, 
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

„ . . , FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 

Manufacturers of ELECTROPLATE. . . . 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 




"Pullman" 
Lawn Sprinkler 

is YOUR 
ORDER IN? 

Send for Folder No. 14. 

PULLMAN MNFG. CO. 

Rochester. N.Y., U.S.A. 



ONTARIO WIND ENGINE 




Have about 100 dozen 

HOCKEY STICKS 

left over from the manufacture of 
this season, which I can offer at 
a reduced rate such as 



Men's X, - 
" Culls, 



$1.50 
$1.10 



You will find some very good lines 
among the Men's Culls, and Men's X are 
clear sticks. 

E. B. SALYERDS, Preston, Ont. 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc 

ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST 

R HEINISCH'S SONS CO. 




NEW YORK OFFICE, I5S Chambers St 
NEWARK. N.J., U.S.A. 




IM 



rturn Screw Driver 



Made of the finest Bo-Ras-Ic steel with steel ferrule and rosewood handle. 

Has a rivet running through the handle, ferrule and blade, making it absolutely secure and impossible to turn in the handle. 

Send for the Green Book of Hardware Specialties for particulars and price. 

The Smith, Hemenway & CO., Utica Drop Forge & Tool Co. 

Mfrs. of Cutlery and Hardware Specialties. Mfrs. of Nippers and Plyers. 

296 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NEW YORK. 

Canadian Sample Room : 215 Coristine Bldg., Montreal, ALLEN C. JENKING, Canadian Manager. 



SEYMOUR 
SHEAR CO. 



TRADE MARK 



SEYMOUR SHEARS 



HAVE BEEN THE 

Standard for over Half a Century. 

"QUALITY UNQUESTIONED." 

Each pair of our shears bears the above trade mark 



SEYMOUR 

SHEAR CO. 



Complete Line TRIMMERS , BANKERS', BARBERS' and TAIL 
ORS' SHEARS, Etc., Etc. 





Henry T. Seymour Shear Company. 

WIEBUSCH & HILGER, Limited, NEW YORK, Sole Agents 



TRADE MARE 



Latest Cata- 
logue will b* 

sent in 

exchange (or 

your busin«M 

card. 



62 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Accountants and Auditors. 

Barber, Henry Jt Co.. Toronto-. 
Fahey, Win., Toronto. 
Hoskius, David, Toronto. 
Jenkins k Hardy, Toronto. 
Kidd, F. H., Toronto. 
Merson, Geo. O., Toronto. 
Williamson. T. G., Toronto 

Anvils 

Boker, Henry, Montreal 

Axes Hatchets, Scythes, etc, 

American Axe and Tool Co., Montreal. 
1 1 las Axe Works. Dundas, Ont. 

Babbitt Metal. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Fairbanks Co.. Montreal and Toronto 
Langwell's, Montreal. 
Syracuse Smelting Works, Montreal. 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

Alwater, Duclos & Chauvin, Montreal. 
Beatty. Blackstock, Fasken k Riddell. 

Toronto. 
Burritt, James H, K.C., Pembroke, Ont. 
Cameron, D. O., Toronto 
Hamilton, J. C, Toronto. 
Topper, Phippen k Tupper, Winnipeg. 
Vidal. I. L. ()., Montmagny and Quebec. 

belting, Hose, etc. 

Canadian Rubber Co., Montreal and 

Toronto. 
Dominion Belting Co.. Hamilton. 
Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg 0o„ 

Toronto. 
Pullman Mfg. Co., Rochester. NY 

box Straps. 

Dartnell, E. F. Montreal. 
Warminton. J. N.. Montreal. Que. 

brass Goods. 

Niiklin, J., k Co., Birmingham, Eng. 

brushes and brooms. 

United Factories, Toronto. 

buffalo Robes. 

Berlin Robe & Clothing Co., Berlin, Onl 

Carpenters' and Builders' Tools 
and Supplies 

Atkins, E. C, k Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Baynes, Chas., Blackburn, Eng. 
Bliss, R.. Mfg. Co., Pawtucket, R.I. 
Cartland, Jas., k Sons, Birmingham, Eng. 
Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 
Howland, H. S. Sons k Co., Toronto. 
Hyde, F., & Co., Montreal. 
Laniplough, F. W. k Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Bros, & Co., Montreal. 
Rice Lewis & Son, Toronto. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 
Metallic Rooting Co., Toronto. 
Newman & Sons, Birmingham. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa, 
Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Ormsby, A. B., & Co., Toronto. 
Phillips, Chas. D., Newport, Eng 
Smith k Hemenway Co., New York. 
Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain. 

Conn. 
Union Mfg. Co.. New Britain. Conn. 

Carpet Stretcher. 

Grand River Metal Works. Gait, Ont 

Carriage and Waggon Ac- 
cessories. 

Duulop Tire Co., Toronto 
Warnock, James, k Co., Gait. Ont 

Cash Registers. 

Hallwood Cash Register Co., Toronto 

Churns. 

Maxwell, David, k Sons, St. Marys. 

Clippers — All Kinds. 

American Shearer Mfg. Co., Nashua, N.H. 
Burman & Sons. Birmingham, Eng. 

Cordage. 

Canadian Cordage and Mfg. Co., Peter- 
borough, Ont. 
Consumers' Cordage Co., Montreal 
Hamilton Cotton Co.. Hamilton 

Corundum. 

Canada Corundum Co., Toronto. 

Cutlery — Razors, Scissors, etc. 

Bailey Cutlery Co., Brantford, Ont. 
Birkett, Tlios , & Son Co., Ottawa. 



Bokei- Henry, Montreal. 
Gem Cutlery Co., New York. 
Heinisch's, R., Sons Co., Newark. N.J. 
Huttou, James, & Co., Montreal. 
Korn, Geo. W., Razor Mfg. Co., Little 

Valley, N.Y. 
Silberstein, A. L., New York. 
Smith k Hemenway Co., New York. 
Wiebusch k Hilger, New York. 

Educational. 

Canadian Corr. College, Toronto. 
St. Margaret's College, Toronto. 
Western Business College, Toronto. 

Electro-Pla ting. 
Sutherland, D., Toronto. 

Engravers. 

Legg Bros., Toronto. 

Files and Rasps. 

Barnett Co., G. & H., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grose, Walter, Montreal. 

Financial Institutions. 

Bank of Toronto, Toronto. 
Bradstreet Co. ■ 

British American Assurance Co., Toronto. 
Canada Permanent Mtg. Co. , Toronto. 
Canadian Bank of Commerce, Toronto 
Confederation Life Ass., Toronto. 
Dom. of Can. Guarantee Co., Toronto. 
Metropolitan Bank, Toronto. 
Toronto General Trusts, Toronto. 
Western Assurance Co., Toronto. 

Firearms and Ammunition. 

Hamilton Rifle Co., Plymouth, Mich. 

Iver Johnson's Arms and Cycle Works, 
Fitchburg, Mass. 

Remington Arms Co., Iliou, N.Y. 

Union Metallic Cartridge Co.. Bridge- 
port, Conn. 



Food Choppers 



Bowman, John, Hardware & Coal Co.. 

Loudon, Ont. 
Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Howland, H. S., Son k Co., Toronto. 
Russell k Erwin Mfg. Co., New Britain, 

Conn. 
Smith k Hemenway Co., New York. 

Gas Lamps and Sundries. 

Auer Light Co.. Montreal. 

Hardware Specialties. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

Hockey Sticks, Pucks, etc. 

Nerlich k Co., Toronto. 
Salyerds, E. B , Preston, Out. 

Horse blankets and Carriage 
Rugs. 

Guelph Waterproof Clothing Co.,Guelph 
Trees, Samuel. fc Co.. Toronto. 

Horseshoe Pads. 

Canadian Rubber Co., Montreal 
Dunlop Tire Co., Toronto. 

Ice Cream Freezeis. 

Dana k Co., Cincinnati. O. 

Ice Cutting Tools. 

D./oaldson, Robt., k Sons, Montreal. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia. Pa 

Iron Pipe. 

Page-Hersey Iron and Tube . o., Guelph 

Iron Pumps. 

McDougall, R., Co., Gait, Out. 

Lanterns. 

Wright, E. T., k Co., Hamilton. 

Lawn Mowers. 

Maxwell, David, k Sons, St. Marys Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Ledgers and Office Stationery . 

Briggs Ledger System Co., Toronto. 
Hart k Riddell, Toronto. 
Weese, G. A. & Son, Toronto. 

Lumbermen' s Supplies. 
Birkett. Tlios., * Son Co., Ottawa 

Machinery. 

Canada Foundry Co. , Toronto. 
Crosby, G. A., & Co., Sarnia, Ont. 
Dodge Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Empire Machine and Metal Stamping 
Co , Toronto. 



Fairbanks Co., Montreal and To La 

Jardine, A. B., & Co., Hespeler, Ont 
Kay Electric Dynamo and Motor Co . 

Toronto. 
Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Morrow MachineScrew Co., Ingersoll.Ont 
Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co., 
Toronto. 

Mantels. 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co., Toronto 

Manufacturers' Agent. 

Gibb, Alexander, Montreal 

Metals. 

American Sheet Steel Co., New York. 
Booth Copper Co., Toronto. 
Canada Iron Furnace Co., Midland, Ont. 
Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Deseronto Iron Co., Deseronto, Ont. 
Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 
Ironside, Son & Co., London, Eng. 
Jackson, C. F., k Co., Vancouver, B.C. 
Leslie, A. C. k Co., Montreal. 
London Rolling Mills Co., London, Ont 
Lysaght, John, Bristol, Eng. 
Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co., New 

Glasgow, N.S. 
Peck Rolling Mills, Montreal. 
Samuel, Benjamin k Co., Toronto. 
Thompson, B. & S. H. & Co., Montreal 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, etc. 

Falkiner, H. F., Toronto, 
Hutton, Jas., k Co., Montreal. 
Oakey, John, k Sons, London, Eng 

Milk Cans and Trimmings. 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Kemp Mfg. Co. , Toronto. 
McClary Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Nickel-Plated Ware. 

Coltart & Cameron. Winnipeg. 

Paints, Oils and Glass. 

Alabastine Co., Paris, Ont. 
Canada Linseed Oil Mills, Montreal. 
Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Toronto 
Dods, P. D., k Co., Montreal. 
Gabriel k Schall, New York. 
Globe Paint Co., Toronto. 
Grant-Hamilton Oil Co., Toronto. 
Henderson k Potts, Montreal and 

Halifax. 
Ho I ibs Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 
Jauiieson, R. C, k Co., Montreal. 
McArthnr, Corneille k Co., Montreal. 
McCaskill, Dougall& Co., Montreal. 
Nobles k Hoare, London, Eng. 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Ramsay k Son, Montreal. 
Ridout, Geo., & Co., Toronto 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 
Standard Paint and Varnish Works, 

Windsor, Out. 
Thorne. R. E., Montreal. 

Perforated Sheet Metals. 

Greening. B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Plumbers' Supplies. 

Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 

Portland Cement. 

Grey and Bruce Portland Cement Co.. 
Owen Sound. 

Hanover Portland Cement Co., Han- 
over, Ont. 

Hyde, F., k Co , Montreal. 

Sun Portland Cement Co., Owen Sound. 

Radiators, Furnaces, Stoves, 
Tinware, etc. 

Adams Co. , Dubuque, Iowa. 
Clare Bros. & Co., Preston, Ont. 
Dominion Radiator Co., Toronto, Onl 
liurney Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Kemp Mnfg. Co., Toronto. 
Sterne, G. F., Brantford, Ont. 
Western Foundry Co., Wingham 
Wright, C. T.,& Co., Hamilton. 

Rooting Supplies. 

.lenking, A. C, Montreal. 
Lockerby & McComb, Montreal- 
Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 
Ormsby, A. B.. k Co., Toronto. 
Paterson Mfg. Co., Toronto & Montreal 

Rubber Stamps. 

Young, C. G., & Co., Toronto. 

Sates. 

Ford k Featherstone, Hamilton 
Taylor, J. k J.. Toronto. 

Scales. 

Fairbanks Co.. Montreal and Toronto. 



Strews, Nuts, bolts. Etc 
Canada Screw Co. Hamilton 
Morrow, John, Machine Screw Co 

Ingcrsol], On! 

Sewer Pipes. 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co., Hamilton 

Hyde, F , & Co . Mom real. 

Shelf Boxes. 

Beimeit Mtg Co., Pickering. Onl 
Shelf Brackets. 

Atlas Mfg. Co., New Haven. Conn 
Grand River Metal Works. Gait. Ont 

Silver-Plated Ware. 

Ontario Silver Co., Niagara Falls 
Toronto Silver Plate Co., Toronto 
Standard Silver Co., Toronto 

Skates. 
Bokcr, Henry, Mom real 

Sporting Goods. 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co., I.itii/, Pa 

Springs. 

Wallace, Barnes Co. , Bristol, Conn 
Steel Castings. 

Montreal Steel Works, Montreal 
Steel Rails. 

Jackson, C. F., & re, Vancouver, B.C 
Sessenwein Bros., Montreal. 

Stencils. Stamps, etc. 

Hamilton Stamp and Stencil Work, 
Hamilton, Ont. 

Tea Strainer. 

Imperial Tea Strainer (',,., Montreal. 

Toasters 

Fairgrieve Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Harkins «: Willis, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Traps. 

Mast. J. M.. Mfg. Co., Litita, Pa 

Tubes. 

Millen. John, .<; Sons. Montreal. 

Wall Paper. 
Staunton's Limited, Toronto. 

Warehousing and Warehouse 

Trucks. 

Coltart ,v. Cameron, Winnipeg. 
Fairbanks Co. Montreal. 
SlingBby, H. C, Montreal. 

Washing Machines, etc. 

Connor, J. H, & Son, Ottawa, Can. 
Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Out 

Watches. 

IngersoU, Robt. H, & Bin., New York. 

Waterproof Covers & Clothing. 

Guelph Waterproof Clothing Co., Guelph 

Wholesale Hardware. 

Birkett, Thos., & Sons Co., Ottawa. 
Bowman, John. Hardware .v Coal Qp., 

London, Ont. 
Canada Hardware Co., Montreal. 
Caverhill, Lear mont k Co., Montreal. 
Howland, H. S , Sons k Co., Toronto 
Kennedy Hardware Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros, k Co., Montreal. 
Rice Lewis & Son, Toronto. 

Woodenware. 
United Factories, Toronto 

Wire, Wire Rope, Cow Tics, 
Fencing Tools, etc. 

American Steel ami Wire Co., New 

York, Montreal, Chicago 
Dennis Wire and Iron Co., London, Onl 
Dominion Wire Mnfg Co., Montreal ami 

Toronto. 
Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton, 
Ironside, Son & Co., London, Eng. 
Meadows, Geo. B., Co., Toronto. 
Oneida Community, Niagara Falls. 
Page Wire Fence Co, Walkerville, Out 
Walter. E. F. k Co., Montreal. 

Wrapping Papers. 

Canada Paper Co., ToronLo. 



63 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishingto be representedin Canada. 




IMPROVED 
WASHING MACHINE. 



The rubbing board in this washer works eccentrically on 

the clothes in such a way that it both rubs and squeezes the 

clothes with every stroke of the rubbing board. 

LARGEST CAPACITY. STRONGLY MADE. 

NEATLY FINISHED. 

THE BEST FOR THE MONEY. 

We have nine other kinds, send for our catalogue. 

J. H. CONNOR & SON, Limited 

Manufacturers 

Washing Machines and Clothes Wringers, 

Pretoria Ave., ■■■■■—.— OTTAWA 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

CHAS. P. CLARK. President. 



JARBD CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 



...ESTABLISHED 1849. 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices: Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New Tors City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers Information tha- reflects the financial condition and the 
controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the merchants. 
by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating informaiiou no effort is spared, and 
no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify us claim as an antbority on all mattert 
affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have been steadily extended, and It 
tar ilshes Information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, Jobbing anc 
manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. Specific 
terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



OFFICES IN CANADA 



HALIFAX, N.8. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPEG. MAJN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C. IRVING- Gen. Man. Western Canada, Toronto. 




Canadian Representative! 
75 YEARS 



ALEXANDER GIBB, 13 St. John St., MONTREAL. 



ESTABLISHED 1825. 



75 YEARS 




"THE REAL" SAFETY RAZOR IS A SELLER 



OUR CONDITIONS ARE : Give to likely customers 
to try and if not absolutely satisfactory return it. 



AGENTS FOR CANADA: 

RICE LEWIS & SON, Limited, Toronto. 
CAVERHILL, LE/\nMONT & CO., Montreal. 



A New Kind of Razor 

You'll be surprised at the way "The Real" Safety Razor shaves- 
different from any other razor. 

It shaves clean and keen — smooth and easy. 

It doesn't pull or break hairs. 

"The Real" is the only perfect razor for self-shaving. 

The rigid handle and the anti-cut guard make it better than the 
ordinary razor — better control of the blade on face, strop or hone — 
quicker work possible — no cutting. 

It's better than other " safety razors " because it's a razor — not a 
hoe. Made of the very finest razor steel— full concave — 2V\ in. blade. 



GEO. W. KORN RAZOR MFG. CO., Little Valley, N.Y., U.S.A 



64 



f 



Want Ads. 



In this paper cost 2 cents per word fiirst 
insertion, 1 cent per word subsequent in- 
sertions. Contractions count as one word, 
but five figures (such as SI. 000) may pass 
as one word. Cash remittance to cover 
cost must In all cases accompany orders, 
otherwise we cannot insert the advertise- 
ment. When replies come in our care 5 
cents additional must be included for for- 
warding same. Many large business deals 
have been brought about through adver- 
tisements of 20 or 30 words. Clerks can be 
secured, articles sold and exchanged, at 
small expenditure. 

MacLBAN PUBLISHING CO., Limited 
Montreal and Toronto 






SOLID STEEL SCISSORS 



Made in Canada and fully warranted 




You will save money and give your customers better 
satisfaction by placing your cutlery orders with 

BAILEY CUTLERY CO., Limited 

■■i nnnriTrnnn, Ontario. 

Razors, Shears, Scissors, Tinners' Snips ani Butcher Knives. 




LUFKIN 



MEASURING TAPES 

peel.f Metallic, Linen, Pocket, Ass Skin, 

2 Pat. Leather, Bend Leather, Etc. 



SSS3 



ARE THE BEST AND MOST POPULAR TAPES IN THE WORLD. 
BS^YOUR STOCK IS NOT COMPLETE WITHOUT THEM. 



LUFKIN RULE CO., Saginaw, Mich, U.S.A. 



New York City Branch— 280 Broadway. 



For sale by ALL PROMINENT CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 



QUALITY FIRST AND ALWAYS." 




"Huron" Stoves 
ssS Ranges 



This letter was written by Geo. K. Potter, 
Berlin : 

" So far the stoves of your manufacture that 
I have sold are giving the very best of satisfaction 
and I think without a doubt you have the winner." 

Is the "HURON " line sold in your town ? 
If not, and you want the best line made in this 
country on your floor, let us hear 
from you. 

Please Note : 
We said the BEST! 




"HURON" STEEL RANGE. 



The Western Foundry Co., Limited, Wingham, Ont. 




{ Black Diamond File Works 

G. & H. Barnett Company 



PHILADELPHIA 

^ Medals 




Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 



*.<*^A^*4 



»'%^^%^/%^%/^%^%-'%^%'%- 




RUBBER HOSE 

FOR 

# 

Water Air Suction 

Steam Acids Fire Protection 

Gas Brewers Pneumatic Tools 



UPERIOR IN QUALITY. 
lATISFACTORY IN SERVICE. 



"Redstone" Sheet Packing 

for High Pressures, 

Does not Burn out or Blow out and requires 
no following up. 



The Gutta Perch a and Rubber Mfg. Go. 



OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms— 
45-47-49 West Front 8t. 



Factories— I IS- 1 66 West Lodge Ave 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



TORONTO. 

CANADA. 



We have in stock the following metals and 
shall be pleased to quote you lowest market prices 
on application, viz. : — 

LEAD 

TIN 

COPPER 

SPELTER 

ANTIMONY 



VARNISHES and JAPANS 

McCASKILL, DOUGALL & CO. 



Manufacturers 



MONTREAL 




B.& S.H.THOMPSON & CO. 



LIMITED 



53 St. Sulpice Street, 
MONTREAL. 

Dominion of Canada Sales Agents for American Sheet Steel 
Company and American Tin Plate Company. 



Standard Railway and Carriage Varnishes 
Standard Boat and Spar Varnishes 

— Won't turn white from the effects of water and sun 

Standard Piano, Furniture and Decorative Varnishes 
Zanzerine Transparent Wood Finishes and Varnishes 
Architectnral Varnishes 



OFFICES 



161 Summer St., 

BOSTON, Mass., U.S.A. 



30 St.! John St., 

MONTREAL 



Classified List of Advertisements on page 63. 



Neither Fictitious nor Exorbitant 

Get LANGWELL'S BABBIT, MONTREAL. 



HARDWARE-METAL 

A. WeeKly Newspaper devoted to tKe Hard-ware, Metal, Machinery, 
Heating and Plumbing Trades in Canada. 



VOL. XVI. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JANUARY 16. 1904. 



NO. 3 




\ CUTLERY 



is- 



FOR SALE BY LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES. 



it 



FLEUR DC LI J" QALYAMZED IRON 

Sold more largely and 
more popular than ever. 



fleurAde u : 




"He 



Every sheet guaranteed. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Maker*, A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTBEAL 
BRISTOL, ENG Managers Canadian Branch. 



A Strong Trade Leader 



For hot water or steam heating the " Safford " Radiator 
is without a parallel. Used in every quarter of the globe. 
We quote a few places : 

His Majesty's Theatre, London. 

His Majesty's Office and Works, Birmingham. 

The Emperor of Germany's Royal Palace. 

Institute of Mechanical Engineers, Westminster. 

Metropolitan Police Headquarters, London. 

Palace Hotel. Cairo, Egypt. 

City Hall, Antwerp, Belguim. 

City Hall, Pietermaritzberg, South Africa. 

Exploration Buildings, Johannesburg, South Africa. 

City Hall, Toronto. 

King Edward Hotel, Toronto. 

If you have not received our Illustrated Catalogue, write 
us. If you wish to see our representative, let us know. 




THE DOMINION RADIATOR CO., Limited 

Head Office : TORONTO, CAN. ■ 

BRANCHES: Montreal, Quebec, St. John, N.B., Winnipeg and Vancouver, B.C. 



Lumbering Tools 



and 



Supplies 






XL 





CHAIN ROUND 
RINGS. 




SCREW CLEVIS 



PIKE POLES, JA **9& 



SWEDES 
IRON 



PILING 
BOOM 
GRAB 
CHAIN 







NO. 36-TIMBER GRIPS. 



NECK YOKES, 
WHIFFLETREES, 
SINGLE TREES, 
BOOT CALKS, 
etc. 



BOOM CHAINS, 
TIMBER DOGS, 
WEDGES, 
SKIDDING TONGS, etc. 




NO. I-ROUND BILL PEAVEYS. 



WRITE FOR TRADE PRICES. 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



COR. KING AND VICTORIA STS., 



TORONTO. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



1 ALWAYS READY FOR USE 

A NO HONING 
\ NO GRINDING 




Retail Price $2.00 



No Hard Blades Raz0r 
No Soft Blades 
No Temper Streaks 
No Returned Blades to the dealer- 
Shave for Years Without Re- 
quiring Honing 

For Sals by all Laading Jobbers 



BOOKLET 
COMING- 

if you'll ask for 
a copy with, 
trade discount. 



or Firm 
of 



Mfrs. of 



A.L.SILBERSTEIN 



453-461 Broadway, New York City 





THE CANADIAN RUBBER CO. 

of Montreal. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



G 



Rubber Belting, 
Hose, Packing, 
Valves, Gaskets, 



ETC, ETC 



We make a specialty of 

HORSE SHOE PADS 

the best in the market, 



Write for Price* and Circular*. 



Head Office : : MONTREAL 

BRANCHES-TORONTO, WINNIPEG and VANCOUVER 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 




YANKEE" 
RATCHET SCREW DRIVER 
N2I5 jj 




Oar "YANKEE" Tool Book 
tells all about them . Mailed 
free on application 



No. 15. "Yankee" Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 




^^f| RtL SP IRAL-RATC HET ORtVEttl] 

' Uj ^)Lf Jiffgjj1JMiJ! ||M 




sa 

No. 30. "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




No. 41. "Yankee" Automatic Drill, Eight Drill Points in Handle. 




Manufacturers also ot 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chipper s. 

Fluting Machines, 

Hand Fluters. 



No. 50. "Yankee" Reciprocating Drill for Iron, Steel, Brass, Wood, etc. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 




No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 

Screw Driver. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



HARDWAM AND MBtAL 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 

LIMITED 

Wholesale Hardware Merchants, 

OTTAWA, OIMT. 



^ 



and 



Builders' 
Lumbermen's 
Contractors' Supplies 



A complete stock always on hand 
for prompt delivery. 

Enquiries solicited. Mail orders filled with 
dispatch. 





s^£2 ;■<■■■ ^ 


^71^ 






The 




jw^fff&y^^ 


Russwin 
Food 


K?^^**Bfc^ 


1 W t^KSvo^^ 


Cutter. 




CLEANLINESS. 



There is no drip from the Russwin to soil clothing and 
floors. The gutter carries all juices to the dish — they are not 
deposited upon the floor. The machine itself is quickly cleaned 
with the least possible effort. Write for Booklets, Posters 
and Electrotypes to assist you. 



Russell & Erwin Mfg. Co. 

New Britain, Conn., U.S.A. 



GALVANIZED 

SHEET5 

From stock or for import 



M.& L SAMUEL, BENJAMIN & CO. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 

27 Wellington St. West, -^TORONTO, ONT. 

EUROPEAN HOUSE 16 PHILPOT LANE, LONDON, ENQ. 



Hardware and metal 



rom Milk Can -to Butter Tub 



YOU'LL KIND A COMPLETE LINE OF DAIRY REQUISITES LISTED IN OUR THOUSAND PAGE CATALOG. 

Pails, 

Brass Strainer 

Cloth, 

Milk Cans 

and Trimmings, 

Funnels, 

Measures, 
Churns, 





Round Batter Moulds, 
seasoned white maple, 
hand carved designs. 



□ 



80! : W 



k: 



Eureka cheese factory milk can. 

n 



Ml 



*m& 



<%*■*. 








No. 4, Flange, nickel- 
Glass plated, 
Floating sliding guard. 



Dairy 

Thermometers 
Butter Bowls 
and Ladles, 
Butter Moulds 
and Prints, 
Scales, 
Butter Spades, 
and Tubs. 



New York Butter Ladle — 
Maple, 9% x 5 inches, paral- 
tine finish. 



\fc 




Style A. 

Leader Churn— Steel frame and 
double reversible steel levers, 
levers adjustable to sitting or 
standing position. 



No. 806/4752. 



No. 08'4 Butter Spade, heavy block tin plated, cocobolo handle. 



Spruce Butter Tub, with cover 



No. 40. 



QUOTE 
LOW 



LEWIS 



TORONTO, OTTAWA, 

87 York 54 Queen 

St. St. 



BROS 

Montreal. 



& CO., 



VANCOUVER, 

141 Water 
St. 



SHIP 
QUICK 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Binder Twine 



BLUE RIBBON, 

RED CAP, 

TIGER, 550 

GOLDEN CROWN, 500 

STANDARD, 500 

SISAL, 500 



650 feet per pound 
600 



X 



Blue Ribbon is no doubt the Queen of Binder 
Twine. It runs six hundred and fifty feet to the pound, 
and is manufactured from most select Manila Fibre. Six 
hundred and fifty foot Twine is the only Twine manu- 
factured entirely from Manila Fibre. Dealers should 
beware of so-called "Manila" Twines which are advertised 
to measure less than 650 feet to the pound. They are 
mixed Twines. 

Write for samples. 



Consumers 

Halifax, N. S. 




Company, Limited 

Montreal, Que. 



CARRIAGE AND SADDLERY HARDWARE 



Hardware »nti 
Metal 



Mam, Morse and Carriage Olo-thing 




Branch Agency : 

W. LOUIS HALDIMAND, Jr., 

36 St. DIzier Street, 
MONTREAL, - QUE., 



Branch Agency : 

CHAS. THOMPSON, 

420 Cordova St. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



Fishermen's Clothing, Horse Covers, Dash Aprons, 

Teamsters' Clothing, Wagon Covers, Knee Rugs 

ASK FOR QUOTATIONS. 

The Guelph Waterproof Clothing Co., Guelph, Ontario. 



THE LION BRAND. 




• COVERT MFG. CO 

West Troy, N.Y 

Auto Screw Jack 



Harness Snaps Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BY JOBBERS AT MFRS. PRICK 



We desire to call your attention to some of our specialties which are handled extensively 

by the general hardware trade. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

' ARE THE BEST. 

highest Quality Grooming and 
Sheep -Shearing Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE TO 
American Shearer Mfg. Co.. Nashua, N.II..CSA 





Oneida Community Goods 

HALTERS, COW TIES, SNAPS, etc., etc., 

in all sizes and styles. May be had of all 
Jobbersthroughout Canada. 

Factory— NIAGARA FALLS, 05T 



For 1904 Buy 

SOLARINE 

£s e t er METAL POLISH 

Order through your Jobber, or write 
SOLARINE DEPOT, 60 George St, TORONTO 



Horse Blankets (all kinds) 
Rubber and Oiled Knee Rugs 



Burlington-Stay -on Blankets 
Plush and Woollen Knee Rugs 



If you handle the above, it will be of interest to you to write us. 
The Trees, Sprfe, Co., Limited, ^ ^ $amue| Jx% ^ % & Cq Toronto 

Importers and Manufacturers of Saddlery Goods. 




^V 



RETURN 

APR 11 

OLMjuruVlT 



That Side Wire 

Tired Feeling. 

All through the trade is getting that feel- 
ing of confidence in the Dunlop Side Wire 
Tire. The points of it are so simple that 
its merits are plain at a glance. The retain- 
ing wires do not pass through the centre of 
the rubber tire, but to either side of it, on 
the outside, close to the rim of the wheel, 
and these retaining wires do not press 
against the rubber, but against across b-irs 
vulcanized into it at regular intervals. The 
wearing, eating-into force of the wire is 
therefore counteracted. The tire may be 
fastened to the wheel with as tight a pres- 
sure as the rim will carry without the wire 
cutting into the rubber, and the grip is so 
tight that sand and gravel cannot work 
between the tire and the rim of the wheel. 



ARE THEnSOLE HANUFACTURERS IN CANADA 



yNLOP TIRE CO., Limited, 
TORONTO, CANADA. 




ncies : Montreal, St. John, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 



RETURNED 
B 11 I90pj 

*3L. 






The Sales You Lose... 

represent just so much money lost. In the matter of robes, for example, you 
c an do a clean cut, profitable business if you sell the right sort of robes. 

"Arctic" Buffalo Robes 

are sensible, durable, attractive, profitable. They are easily sold, for they 
sell themselves, with a ver3' little talk on your part. Order a sample. 

Made of rich, dark brown fur, lined with red or dark green Astrachan cloth, interlined with rubber ; 
nicely trimmed ; rain, wind and moth proof ; 52 x 54 ; 62 x 54 ; 72 x 54. 



rlin Robe & Clothing Co., 

Berlin, Ontario. 



LIMITED 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



WIRE 



| DO YOU 
HANDLE 



R 

E 



WIRE? 



WE MANUFACTURE AND SELL 
ALL KINDS OF WIRE : 

Hay Baling Wire. 
Oiled and Annealed Wire. 
Plain Galvanized Fence Wire. 
Galvanized Hard Coiled 

Spring Wire. 

In carloads, or less than carloads. 
WRITE FOR PRICES. 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO. 

LIMITED 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



FENCING 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. 



LIMITED 



4-barb 6-in. 
4-barb 4-in. 



2-barb 5-in. 
2-barb 24-in. 



Plain Twist 
2 Wires. "" *" 




lbs. per mile 



Coiled SPRING Galvanized Fence. 
BRIGHT and GALVANIZED FENCE STAPLES, 

Mi to 2 INCHES. 

ANNEALED WIRE 

FOR BALING 

HAY — PULP — PAPER RAGS — SHINGLES— ETC. 

BUY ^H»* GOODS 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York 

Empire Building 



Montreal 

N. Y. Life Building 



Chicago 

The Rookery 



BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED PLAIN WIRE 

PLAIN TWIST CABLE FENCING 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire; Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of 
every description; Rail Bonds, Bale Ties, Special Wires for all 
purposes, Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold-drawn Steel 
Sh afting. 

WE STRAP THE WORLD! 




Cary's Universal Box Strap 



A 



MA UK J N FOUR WIDTHS. 
X inch, % inch, % inch and 1 inch. 
PATENTED IN ALL COUNTRIES. 



CONTINUOUS Metal Strap with a series of raised bosses along the edges, to 
strengthen same and protect nail heads. Put up in coils of 300 feet each, and 
packed 20 coils in a case. On each coil we put our patent metal reel frame, making 
it a complete reel. 

Montreal E F DARTNELL, 180 St. James St. 

HEADQUARTERS : 



BELL TELEPHONE MAIN No. 2382. 



ti 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in Hardware and Metal- 



Established 1854 
Phone Main 1700 



the GEO. B. MEADOWS 



Toronto Wire, Iron an Brass Works Company, Limited. 
Manufacturers of Wire Window Guards, Wire Cloth, 
Moulders' Riddles, Children's Cots, Bank and Office 
Railings, Ornamental iron Fencing, Window Fix- 
tures, Wire Work, Architectural Wrought Iron 
Work. 1 x 7 Klng st Wegt TOEONTO, ONT 



TRUCKS 

for Warehouse 
and Factory. 

Save You Money 

Do Men's 




Draw no Salary 



Our Trucks are guaranteed satisfactory. 
Turn in their own length. 

MADE IN CANADA. 

H. C. Slingsby for Canada. 

Factory, 

Ontario Street, 



Temple Building, 

MONTREAL. 



IRONSID 



f-or IRON 



Our Specialties are British and Foreign Iron and Steel, Metals, Bars, Plates, Sheets, Bolts 
and Nuts, Tin Plates, etc. 

We are sole Licencees for Page's Patent Wire Stretcher and also for Ironside's Patent 
Wire Cutters. 

We Publish Monthly a "CANADIAN METAL PRICK LIST," giving quotations InBollars and Cents 
ifJ.I.F,). also "WEEKLY MARKET REPORT." 

Let us have your name and address for 'PRICE LIST" and "MARKET REPORT." 

IRONSIDE, SON & CO., 6 aTe a .r T ^ n e e r St EC 



London, England. 



G. A. Crosby <& Co. of Ontario, 




Manufacturers of" 



SARN1A, ONT. 



LIMITED 



Patent Automatic Can Making Machinery, Presses, 
J^ Dies and Special Machinery for Working Sheet Metal 

H. W. Petrle, 141-145 Front Street West, TORONTO- Selling Agent. 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON -EJECTING 



12, 16 and 20 Guage. 
Steel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
Take Down ' 
Cun Made 




Sausage Staffer, Lard 
and Fruit Press 




8 Sizes and Styles 

Rapid Grinding and 
Pulverizing Mills 

to Sizes and Styles 
for Hand and Power 




No. 3, $5.50. 

Bone, Shell and Corn 
Mill 




No. 750, $850. 



TRADE 



ENTERPRISE 



Meat and Food Choppers 



Meat Juice Extractor 



TINNED 

40 Sizey arid Styles for Hand arid Power 
from 251.00 to $300.00 




No. 12, $2.75. 
Sold by all the leading* Jobbers of the Dominion 

ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE MAILED FREE 



The Enterprise Mfg. Co. of P&>. 



Philadelphia, Pa,., U. S. A. 




j No. 21, 82.50 



Raisin Seeder 




1 No. 36. Si. 00 



; Cold Handle Polishing 
IRON 




No. 82, $7.50 per doz. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Kennedy Hardware Co 



49 Colborne Street, TORONTO. 

Full line Rodger's Pocket ltnives, 
single and double bl/de. 



LIMITED, 



Letter and 'phone orders receive special attention. 



Strictly wholesale. 



DO IT NOW 



Buy 

True 
Brand 




Fencing 
Plyers 



BEST GOODS 



RIGHT PRICES 



E. F. WALTER & CO., "siA. Montreal 

DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 




44 



ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA. 

Maxwell Favorite Churn" Lawn Mowers. 



PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever 
Drive, and Detachable Driving Link. Improved 
for season of 1904. Steel or Wood Frame as 
desired. 

Wheelbarrows. ** F ° ur ^«^ ««.. 



High andLow VVheels.from 
12 in. to 20 in. widths. Cold 
Rolled Steel Shafting, Cru- 
cible Steel Knives and Cutting Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you these 
articles 



Steel Frame Churn 



SEND DIRECT TO US. 

"THE MAXWELL" 

Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches 



MAXWELL MOWER 

8-inch Low Wheel. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



IRON 



Bars in Flats, Rounds, Squares, 
Ovals, Half-Ovals, Half Roundsand 
Bands. Also Wrought Washers. 

QOOD QUALITY. PROflPT SHIPMENT. 



London Rolling Mill Co. 



Limited, 



STEEL 



LONDON, CANADA. 



PAGE-HERSEY IRON & TUBE CO., 

GUELPH, CANADA, Limited 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

BLACK AND GALVANIZED 

WROUGHT MERCHANT PIPE 

OF SUPERIOR QUALITY AND FINISH. 



The New Century Bail-Bearing 
Washing Machine. 




Not the cheapest but decidedly the best Washing 
Machine made. 

Five to seven minutes only required for a tubful. 

The operator need not stand when using it, and there is practically 

no wear on garments. 

Full information given on application. 

THE DOWSWELL MANUFACTURING CO., 



Hamilton, Ont. 

W. L. HALDIMAND * SON, Montreal, 



Limited. 
Eastern Agents. 




<£ Australasian ^ 
Hardware and Machinery. 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
and Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 



Fink's Buildings. 

Post Office Chambers. 



post free to any part of the world 

publishing: offices: 

Melbourne 
Sydney, • • 
BRITISH OFFICES : 

London, - - A3 Cannon St.,E.C. 
CANADIAN AND AMERICAN ENQUIRIES will receive prompt 
attention if addressed to the LONDON OFFICE, 42 CANNON 
STREET, E.C. 

Specimen Copies Free on Application. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




W 



Hold a dime close to your 
eye with your right hand and 
a bright silver dollar a few 
inches away with your left; 
you cannot see the dollar be- 
cause the smaller coin obscures 
your vision. 

So it is with some people; 
in their eagerness to save a 
dollar they often lose sight of 
the fifty within their reach. 

They would rather have a 
penny than a pound — if it 
meant spending the penny to 
get the pound. 

Does the illustration apply ? 

Are you saving (?) money by 
not advertising in HARD- 
WARE AND METAL ? 





FLAT— SPIRAL or VOLUTC 

INTERESTING CATALOG MAILED ON APPLICATION 

THE WALLACE BARNES CO. 

BRISTOL CONN. 



The John Bowman Hardware 
and Coal Co., 



LONDON, 



ONT. 

FOOD 
CUTTERS 



Gem— No. 20. 

" 22. 
" 24 



Enterprise- 




No. 25. 



No. 



10. 
12. 
22. 
32. 
100. 



Alexander 



No. 



10. 
12. 

22. 
32. 



Also Extra Plates 
and Knives. 



SEND US YOUR ORDERS. 



MACLEAN PUBUStllNt CO -DCPT0FAOVEHTI5IN& 5EP.VIC& 



10 



Hardware and metaL 



Canadian Cordage 

& MFG. Co., Limited. 



Manila Rope 

of all kinds, from the largest 
to the smallest. 



Lath Yarn. 




^^ We guarantee our goods 
from all substances calculated 

ers will find on careful test that our 

Binder Twine. 





Sisal Rope 

of all kinds, from -the largest 
to the smallest. 



Shingle Yarn 




to be absolutely Pure and free 
to increase weight. Consum- 
goods are the Most Economical. 



Binder Twine 



Royal Manila, 650ft 
Royal Manila, 600 ft 



to 
the lb. 



to 



the lb. 



to 
the lb. 



Royal Manila, 550 ft 
Royal Manila, 500 fte 1 ?,, 
Standard, - 500 fte 1 ?,, 



Sisal, 



Ron ft to 

<~)\J\J the 1 



the lb. 



* * 



The latest and finest machinery is operated in this 
factory and although not the largest, it is the finest 
mill of its size in the world. 



For LOW PRICES and HIGHEST QUALITY, Wire, Write or 'Phone. 

CANADIAN CORDAGE & flFG. CO., Limited 

Peterborough, Ont. 

ii 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



a 



WOODYATT "- STAR 




WOODYATT MOWER 

Patented throughout the world. 



Lawn Mowers 



These high-grade wheels are known in every 
land, and are constructed of the very best ma- 
|jp^ terial that money can buy, with simple adjust- 

ments, and easy to operate. 



Improved in many parts, and guaranteed. 
Sold only through the Wholesale Trade. 

TAYLOR TORRES COMPANY, 




STAR MOWER 



Branch — 9 De Bresoles Street, 

Montreal, Que. 



LIMITED 



Head Office, 

Gcielph, ©nt. 

THE LARGEST AND BEST EQUIPPED HRADWARE FACTORY IN CANADA. 



THE BEST RESULTS ALWAYS FOLLOW THE SALE AISD USE OF 



KEMP'S 



BROAD HOOP ROLL RIM 
BOTTOM MILK CAN TRIMMINGS 





A criticising public have used them for the past five years and the increasing 
demand is proof of their superiority, also evidence of the satisfaction 
which they give. 

The Roll Rim Bottom having no sharp turns does not break the grain of the 
metal or lessen its wearing qualities. 

Narrow Top Hoops can be supplied in place of Broad Top Hoops if desired. 

For Strength, Durability and Finish our Trimmings are unexcelled. 

They cost no more than inferior qualities. 

We also carry in stock a full line of First Quality Tinned Iron, cut suit- 
able for the different size of Trimmings, which we will supply at the 
lowest current market quotations. 

KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO, CANADA. 

12 




Classified List of Advertisements on Page 63. 



Hardware and 
Metal 



FILLING UP THE GREAT WEST 



By Hon- Clifford Sifton, Minister of Interior, Canada. 



fy«0»/|/W» 



THE question of immigration— in 
other words the acquisition 
for the Dominion of a pro- 
ducing population and its set- 
tlement on the land— is of the 
utmost importance to the Empire. Gen- 
tlemen conversant with the affairs of 
Empire, know that one of the difficul- 
ties which beset us has been the drain 
upon our youne 1 men from south of the 
boundary line. We can only keep them 
by furnishing them with something to 
do, and by building up the country in 
such a way as that they could follow 
their occupations as profitably as in any 
other land. We have been in the posi- 
tion for a long time of possessing an 
equipment Avhich enabled us to do busi- 
ness with a larser market than we had. 



minor places; we had between 200 and 
300 agents paid by commission. There 
were difficulties in the way of our 
agents which you can hardly realize. We 
had one young man who came back and 
told us that he could not make any im- 
pression; that people did not know 
where Canada was ! In the last five 
3'ears that man has sent to Canada 5,000 
of the best people we have in the West. 
He sent us 1,500 German-Americans, the 
very best class of farmers we have. 

" We organized our work in 1897 and 
adopted the method which I shall out- 
line to you. In 1898 we had only 712 
immigrants from the United States. The 
influx continued to be so small that I 
saw something had to be done, and I 
authorized advertisements in American 



Work in Britain. 
" In Great Britain our work 1ms been 
of a very difficult character. For many 
years immigration work there was un- 
der the care of the High Commissionei - , 
and was carried on in a semi-diplomatic 
manner, and not in a business way. 
(Laughter.) It was not the fault of the 
High Commissioner or his officials, who 
had to work under the conditions under 
which they were placed. I sent Mr. 
Smart over there, and had the work re- 
organized on a purely business basis and 
placed it under an official who had no- 
thing else to do. He got the names of 
all the agriculaural laborers he could 
and mailed 1,200,000 copies of a paper 
on the resources of Canada. You would 
have thought people would have known 




an 2a 

/~\ /1 Jy"LMi s i Canadian Northern Railway 

Our main resource has been agriculture, 
but comparatively only a few can fol- 
low it, and, unless they find profitable 
employment in it, they will leave Can- 
ada. We have tried to enable this coun- 
try to do business on a larger scale, but 
development is slow under all Govern- 
ments. I have been unceasing during 
the last seven years in trying to grapple 
with this problem. 

Work in Western States. 

When I took office I looked over the 
ground to see where this work could be 
prosecuted best, and found it was in the 
Western States. In 1897 we establish- 
ed agencies in Chicago, Omaha, Kansas 
Citv and St. Paul, and in a number of 



The Pioneer Age of the Red River Cart. 

papers, which reached 5,700,000 families. 
We found that the Western States Edi- 
torial Associations were in the habit of 
taking yearly excursions. We arranged 
one for them, which" took them from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific, and when they 
got home they could not do less than 
publish appreciative descriptions of 
Canada, which we promptly collected in 
the shape of a book. We sent 100,000 
of these to our agents in Wisconsin, 
Iowa and Michigan, so that when a man 
found any fault with Canada we could 
point him out the answer from his own 
people. For another thing the editors 
of these papers all refused to publish 
anything derogatory to Canada after 
that. 



all about Canada, but the issue was 
hardly out before thousands of people 
wrote for particulars. By advertise- 
ments we reached some ten million peo- 
ple, and we placed atlases and maps 
in the schools of the United Kingdom, 
reaching the people through the children 
which I found the best way of getting 
at the middle classes. In the coronation 
arch we had a splendid advertisement, 
and I am told it was the only picture 
of the coronation hundreds took away 
with them. There has been a marked 
improvement in our immigration be- 
cause of that. We have a handsome 
office now in Charing Cross, where the 
clerks begin at 9 and leave off at 6, and 
Avliere business is done as promptly as 



13 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



in any office in Toronto. The fittings 
are Canadian, set up by Canadian work- 
men, and the office is a standing ad- 
vertisement to this country, and the way 
we do business. 

Work on the Continent. 

On the Continent we found our 
work in an unsatisfactory condition, and 
1 decided to place it in the hands of the 
North Atlantic Trading Association. 
Tiic class of people which is being sent 
but is almost entirely agriculaural. 

Results. 

In 1900 we got from all countries 42,- 
500, and in the fiscal year of 1903 we 
got 128,900. Of these 49,488 were from 
the United States, 41,792 from the 
United Kingdom, and 37,000 from the 
Continent. For the calendar year of 
1903 we got 135,000 people, 30,000 more 
than the year before. Practically all 
these go on the land. The total cost of 



has the most important task of the Gov- 
ernment of Canada at present. If the 
Government of which I am a member, or 
any succeeding it, is able to fairly fill 
the West with a hardy and stable class 
of people they will be doing the West 
a most important service and all the 
other provinces will profit likewise." 



OPEN AN OFFICE IN WINNIPEG. 

The Maclean Publishing Co., Montreal, 
Toronto and Winnipeg, have secured the 
services of Mr. L. P. Luxton as their 
western Canadian representative. Mr. 

Luxton has secured an office in the Me- 
Intyre block, and is now busily engaged 
in looking after the interests of the 
Maclean trade papers, which are the best 
of their kind in Canada, and the equal of 
most trade papers published the world 
over. Col. J. B. Maclean, the pivot upon 
which these publications revolve, believes 
in giving Canadian readers the best, and 















- 




t ' 




vil 


j 




i^^M^t 


aBt - 









Lit 

*J.l\ $18,747,000 worth of settlers' effects, and 
er $25,000,000 in cash. The people 



VThe Modern Age of 
Canadian. Northern Railway. 

immigration, not including the taking 
cars- of them, is $5.67 per head on the 
average. These people have brought in 

o\ 

from the United States settle on land 
and produce, on a moderate estimate, 
$2,(100 worth per annum •each. It is a 
mistaken idea that all the available 
lands in the States are taken up, so it 
shows how the people realize the ad- 
vantage of our lands. Last year there 
were 31,000 homesteads taken up in the 
West. The class we want is the farm- 
ing class, men from the United States, 
from the Old Land and from Europe, 
with a knowledge of agriculture. 

" My own view of the work which my 
department has to perform is that it 



the Passenger Coach. 

to say that he has succeeded admirably 
in this respect would be putting it mild- 
ly. The Dry Goods Review, The Canadian 
Grocer, "Hardware and Metal," Book- 
seller and Stationer, and Military Gazette 
are among the Maclean newspapers.— The 
Winnipeg Tribune. 



CANADIAN PREFERENTIAL 
TARIFF. 

A MOST practical example of the 
good effects upon British exports 
which have been brought about 
by the rebate in duty on goods of " Brit- 
ish origin " imported into Canada has 
recently come to our notice, says Com- 
mercial Bristol. 

A well-known firm of manufacturers 
in our city had been doing a small in- 



termittent trade in Canada, and in 1896 
one of the partners went to the Domin- 
ion with a view to see on the spot whe- 
ther this trade was worth following up. 

He was only in Canada for a week, but 
placed some good agents, advised his 
firm to advertise in the best journal of 
their trade, and came home satisfied 
that some increase in orders would fol- 
low in course of time. 

That year the firm's Canadian trade 
was ten times greater in volume than in 
1895, and a year or so after^ when the 
preferential tariff came into operation, 
it again increased considerably. 

The further rebate from 25 per cent, 
to 33 1-3 per cent, again helped this 
firm's Canadian trade, and this present 
year is their best record, and quite six 
times as much as it was in 1896, just be- 
fore the new tariff came into force. 

In one week at the end of October the 
firm under notice booked Canadian or- 
ders equal to the total value of some 
whole year's trade, and they now con- 
fidentlv expect a further large exten- 
sion of trade next year. 



A KINDLY REMEMBRANCE. 

At the commencement of the new busi- 
nes syear, the general manager of E. W. 
Gillett Co., Limited. Mr. Win. Dobie, 
was waited upon by the 16 travelling re- 
presentatives and members of the office 
staff and presented with a beautiful 
French gilt ornamental ink stand and 
also a thermometer and desk calendar 
combined. At the same time the boys 
did not forget Mrs. Dobie, audi she also 
received a fine ink stand of the same 
material. 

Mr. Dobie in acknowledging these 
beautiful gifts, thanked the doners not 
only for them but for the excellent ser- 
vices rendered to the company during 
the year just ended, and concluded by 
wishing all a prosperous and happy new 
year. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shtpmeati 



The ONTARIO TACK CO 

Limited 

HAMILTON QW\ 



14 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

Hardwakk and Metal would be pleased to review 
catalogues, booklets or other such publications issued 
by manufcturers or wholesale dealers selling to the 
hardware, plumbing, machinery or metal trades. Re- 
tailers desiring such publications may also have inserted 
a note to that effect. No charge will be made for these 
services. 

DOOR AND WINDOW FURNITURE. 

E. Keeling, Teale & Co., Limited 
Raven'scourt square, London, Eng., are 
issuing n comprehensive catalogue and 
price list nf the door furniture, case- 
ment fasteners and stays, wrought iron 
uates and Failings, lift enclosures and 
staircase balusters, portico shelters and 
covered ways, hank and door grilles, 
simp and street lamps, electric, oil and 
gas fittings, church fittings, etc. Any 
readers of " Hardware and Metal " who 
are interested in these lines would he 
w;.- •■ to secure this catalogue as Keeling, 
Teale & Co. are recognized as up-to- 
date manufacturers id' artistic and orig- 
inal designs in their line. 

INTERNATIONAL STOCK BOOK. 

The International Stock Food Co., 
Minneapolis and Toronto, have issued one 
of the most useful stock hooks which 
any owner of animals could desire. It 
is an 160-page publication, illustrated 
with photogravures of some of the most 
famous horses, cattle and other stock 
of the present day, the first illustration 
being a cut of " Dan Patch," 1.5(51-4, 
the champion harness horse of the world. 
Of the book over 40 pages are devoted 
to horses, 25 to cattle, 50 to sheep and 
hogs, over 20 to veterinary information 
ami suggestions and 20 to poultry. The 
engravings in the book cost over $3,000 
and the printing, etc., has all been of 
high-grade. Consequently the hook is 
likely to he kept on file by stock owners 
generally. It will be sent free to any 
hardware dealer mentioning this paper. 
If further copies were desired for dis- 
tribution to large customers this would 
also be arranged by coresponding with 
the Toronto office of the company. 

GREETINGS FROM THE EAST. 

'Hardware and Metal" desires to 
acknowledge the receipt of one of the 
daintiest New Year's cards of the sea- 
son from Frank Powers, the Lunenburg 
plumber and stove man, and would re- 
ciprocate in the expression of good 
wishes for a prosperous 1904. 

FIRE HOSE AND SUPPLIES. 
The (iutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. 
Co.. of Toronto, have ready for the use 
of the trade a useful booklet descriptive 
of their fire hose and supplies. The 
prominence of this firm and the reputa- 
tion of the products are so generally 




:rger 



The. Paris Green that is strictly pure, made and kept at 
government standard. — That's Berger's. 

The Paris Green that is sure death to bugs, that kills every 
time. — That's Berger's. 

The Paris Green that is the most widely sold and generally 
used in Canada. — That's Berger's. 

The Paris Green that profits the dealer most and protects the 
farmer's crop always. —That's Berger's. 

Write us to-day and we'll tell you all about Berger's. 

id 

WThe Sherwin-Williams Co., paint and varnish makers. 



CANADIAN HEADQUARTERS AND FACTORIES 




recognized that this catalogue should be 
on the shelves of every hardware deal- 
er. It can be had on application. 

DOMINION BELTING CALENDAR. 

The calendar issued by the Dominion 
Belting Co., Hamilton, is entirely orig- 
inal. The background of the calendar 
is an accurate representation of belting 
with as a central figure a fine maple leaf, 
the national emblem. The calendar 
would be a neat one for office use and 
will be sent on request to readers of 
" Hardware and Metal." 

LOCKERBY it M'COMB. 

The year 1004 is already remarkable 
for the great number of handsome calen- 
dars prepared in its honor. Each cal- 
endar that comes to hand seems hand- 
somer than the last. Lockerby $ Mc- 
Coiub. 65 Shannon street, Montreal, have 
every reason It) be proud of their 1904 
calendar, which is bound to be popular. 
15 



It would he an ornament to any office 
or shop on account of its artistic quali- 
ties. No matter how many calendars 
you have already received write for this 
one. — — 

OFFICE FIXTURES. 

The George B. Meadows Wire, 
Iron and Brass Company, Toronto, 
are sending out seasonable greet- 
ings, the feature of which is an in- 
teresting view of bank fixtures "made 
in Canada ' ' by that company. The fix- 
tures are both artistic and practical and 
are a credit to their makers. 

SPORTING CALENDAR. 

The Dominion Canister Co., of Dundas, 
are sending to the trade an exceedingly 
attractive calendar — one that those with 
a love of gunning will feel like preserving 
framed. A brace of ducks, suspended 
from a nail, reproduced in colors, consti- 
tutes the design. "Hardware" acknow- 
ledges receipt with thanks. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




ONTARIO. 

J. Reid & Co., general merchants. 
Thorton, have assigned. 

I. Doane, wagon maker, Stratford, has 
assigned to R. Burritt. 

J. W. Anderson, carriage maker, Lu- 
can, has sold out to R. Simpson. 

Davis & Eizerman, Mitchell, have sold 
their planing mill to W. Eizerman. 

R. W. Gray, harness maker, Fort Wil- 
liam, has assigned to A. W. Thompson. 

W. J. Moore, grain dealer, Chatham. 
has admitted W. H. Benson to partner- 
ship. 

B. D. Steacy, hardware merchant, 
Brockville, has advertised his business 
for sale. 

Park & Hodgins, general merchants, 
Sutton West, have sold their stock to G. 
H. Johnston. 

The assets of J. Lanthier, general mer- 
chant, Wendover, were advertised to be 
sold 12th hist. 

The premises of J. E. Diamond, har- 
ness maker, Campbellford, have been 
damaged by fire. 

Charlebois Bros., general merchants, 
Penetanguishene, are ' advertising their 
business for sale. 

W. B. McLean & Co., proprietors of 
saw and planing mills, North Bay, have 
dissolved partnership. 

A meeting of the creditors of G. T. 
Browning, builder, Aurora, was announc- 
ed for January 15. 

The Mount Forest Mfg. Co., manufac- 
turers of mouldings, etc., Mount Forest, 
are asking for an extension. 

W. J. Brooke, general merchant and 
proprietor of a shingle mill, Providence 
Bay, has assigned to D. A. Beckell. 

B. Hunter, general merchant, Dacre, 
has assigned to W. A. Cole. Meeting of 
creditors advertised for 14th inst. 

Conn & Taylor, hardware merchants, 
Aylmer, have dissolved partnership. 
Mr. Conn continues in business. 

Hall & Glavin, general merchants, 
Mount Carmel, have dissolved partner- 
ship. . Mr. Hall continues in business. 

The Hamilton Motor Works, Hamil- 
ton, have assigned to W. G. E. Boyd. 
Meeting of creditors announced for 15th 
inst. 

A meeting of the creditors of F. A. 
Carpenter & Co., wholesale dealers in 
steamfitters' supplies, Hamilton, was 
called for January 15. 




AUTOMATIC 




The Revolver 

that made the 
name of Iver 
Johnston 

famous. 



Absolutely Safe. Accidental Discharge Impossible 




Safe because Iver Johnston genius 
devised a mechanism that is unfail- 
ing and perfect— a feature not pos- 
sessed by any other revolver made. 

OTHERS OlAIM, BUT WE SHOW TH*! GOODS 



Automatic 
Hammer. 



Send for both firearms and cycle 
catalogues. 

IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 

New York Office, 99 Chambers Street. FITCHBUR9, MASS. 



' BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

H. Brackman, of the Brackman-Kera 
Milling Co., Victoria, is dead. 

MANITOBA AND N.W.T. 

J. Stinson, hardware merchant, Aus- 
tin, has sold out to W. T. Speed. 

The premises of Code & Crozier, general 
merchants, Olds, have been damaged by 
fire. 

The premises of F. Brinkworth, general 
merchant, Belmont, have been destroyed 
by fire. 

S. L. Patmore, hardware merchant, 
Minitonas, is advertising his business 
for sale. 

Cooper, Lamb & Co., hardware mer- 
chants, Raymond, have dissolved part- 
nership. 

The stock belonging to the estate of 
N. D. McDonald, Rosthern is advertised 
for sale by tender. 

J. B. Cain, hardware merchant, Vir- 
den, has sold out to the Manitoba Hard- 
ware and Lumber Co. 

Card & Fenwick, hardware merchants, 
Westwood, have sold out. Possession 
to be given in the' Spring. 

G. H. Brown, general merchant, and 
FTogoie & Pegg, general merchants, both 
16 



J. J. Story, general merchant, Wawa- 
nesa, has sold out to R. Weir, 
of Condie, have been succeeded by The 
Condie Supply Co. 

QUEBEC. 

Swan, Church & Co., contractors, 
Montreal, have registered. 

The Canada Tag and Label Printing 
Co., Montreal, have registered. 

P. Leroux & Cie., manufacturers of shoe 
polish, etc., Montreal, have registered. 

Rabinovitez Bros., general merchants. 
St. Guillaume d' Upton, have assigned. 

F. F. Powell & Co., roofers and con- 
tractors, Montreal, have dissolved part- 
nership. 

A meeting of the creditors of Knott 
& Gardner, plasterers, Montreal, has 
been called. 

The premises of the Dominion Cart- 
ridge Co., Brownsburch, have been dam- 
aged by explosion. 

Demand of the assignment of Wm. 
Clendenning & Son, foundry and stove 
manufacturers, Montreal, has been made. 

The premises of Harrison Bros., 
blacksmiths and wheelwrights, Lennox- 
ville, have been damaged by fire. Loss 
partially covered by insurance. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



37-39 West Front Street, Toronto. 

THE CHICAGO CLIPPING MACHINE, &C 



LIMITED 

ONLY 
WHOLESALE 





Knife suitable for "1902" and "20th CENTURY 
Clippers. 



THE " ?Oth CENTURY CLIPPER." 

Is it any wonder that the demand for 
the new "20th Century" clipper is enor- 
mous? Why, it gives a customer a machine 
for a little more than the cost of a hand 
clipper. 

A time and money saver that does a hun- 
dred times the work and does it much 
better. 

It hangs up, giving the operator elbow 
room and facility. 

Runs easy, cuts fast, requires no experi- 
ence to operate. 

It only weighs 15 pounds, and when 
Boxed is small enough for shelf goods 
(3x 12 x 14 in.) *4 



Iff-* IPv6 Mf •? A J WM 




•Wrr'-.Y:.. . 






" 1902." 

When it comes to quality, no other 
hand-power Horse-clipping Machine that is 
made anywhere by anybody, at any price, 
compares with the "Chicago 1902." 

Its construction is so simple, strong and 
fine : the only machine made that can be 
turned with the right or '.eft hand. 

All the gearing is cut from solid metal. 
It stands on a firm'rigid base. No belt to 
slip, positive power. 



l clipped horse dries out from sweating in 20 minutes and 
can sleep without risk of getting cold. 




Horse Clippers 



FOR FULLER LINES SEE OUR HARDWARE CATALOGUE. 



H. S- HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



LIMITED, 



Toronto. 



WE ship promptly 



CUUL 



GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST. 

Factory: DufTarin Street, Toronto 



OUR prices are right 



Hardware and 
Metal 



MACHINERY 



MADE IN CANADA 




Stitched Cotton 
Duck Belting 

Superior to all others. 

FOR 

Agricultural Machines, Elevators, 
Pulp and Paper Mills, Cotton, Woollen, 
Cement and Saw Mills, Machine Shops 
and Electric Powers. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Dominion Belting Company 



Limited 



HAHILTON, CANADA. 
USE OUR 

"MAPLE LEAF BELT DRESSING" 



(tTU JC DtTITDI F^^" jS (he best Bolster Spring ever produced. A fine 
■ ■■ LLULL %# W line for the hardware trade. Write Ui for Prices 



JAMES WARNOCK & CO., 



GALT, ONT. 



It's handy to use our brown and 
manilla 

Wrapping Papers 

because they have strength and 
durability essential to satisfac- 
tory wrapping papers. Full 
weight and full count in every 
order. 

CANADA PAPER CO. 

Limited 
Toronto, Montreal and Windsor Mills, Que. 




Kay Electric Dynamo and Motor Co., Limited 

Manufacturers of Dynamos and Motors for all pur- 
poses, both direct and alternating currents. Special 
attention given to repairs. 

Office and Works, 219-221 Queen St. East, Toronto. 

'Phone Main 1251. Estimates cheerfully given. 




RETURNED 
AUG -4 190 ^ 



Do You 



>a 



Want the Best? 



if so, get The FAIRBANKS Standard Scale. Their 

reputation is World-Wide. We build the BEST, the most reliable, accurate 
and long-wearing — the Scale it pays to ^"^IyurnED 

SEND FOR OUR CATALOGUE. AU G 4< 

The name "FAIRBANKS" speaks for itself. 




HE FAIRBANKS COMPANY 

MONTREAL. TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 



Hardware and 

Metal 




The Machinery Markets. 

TORONTO. 

THE quiet feeling which gener- 
ally predominated the machin- 
ery market last week, con- 
tinued on into the present 
week, but during the last few 
days things have been picking up to some 
extent in most lines, and in some this 
increase has been very marked indeed. 
During the latter part of the week the 
demand for boilers and engines has been 
very good indeed. The feature of the 
market this week, however, is the re- 
markable run on saw-mill outfits. The 
machinery men are almost unanimous 
in saying that the number of orders and 
enquiries for saw-mill machinery, and 
indeed wood-working machinery of all 
kinds, including planing mill and shingle 
mill machinery, have been very marked. 
The demand for machine tools and ma- 
chinery of a like nature remains steady. 
In the electrical machinery line, however, 
things are still very quiet, that is in 
actual business transacted. The num- 
ber of enquiries have been large, as was 
the case last week, but so far this year 
the number of orders placed has been 
small. Of course this position of af- 
fairs is not at all unusual at this time 
of the year; indeed it is quite general, 
but considering that in other lines of 
machinery a departure has been made 
from the precedents of former years in 
that when things have been generally 
quiet, a good demand has been main- 
tained, it is rather to be wondered at 
that the demand for electrical machin- 
ery has not been good in sympathy with 
the rest of the market. There have been 
numerous enquiries for gas and gaso- 
line engines during the latter 
part of this week, and manufacturers 
and dealers say that there is a bright 
outlook for 1 tli is class of engines during 
the coming year. The larger number of 
enquiries have been in regard to engines 
of from 1 1-2 to 4 horse-power, as a 
motive power on farms and for work of 
a similar nature. A general round-up 
of the market shows that things are 
much as was expected. Enquiries have 
been quite numerous, they being in some 
lines more numerous than last week, and 



orders are beginning to be placed. IF 
business turns out as is generally pre- 
dicted we may expect a busy Winter in 
the machinery line. 

The A. R. Williams Machinery Co. 
report that the market is much the same 
as last week in that enquiries have been 
very numerous and not very many or- 
ders booked. This has reference to the 
market in general, and not to boilers 
and engines nor to wood-working ma- 
chinery. They say that the demand for 
engines and boilers, especially boilers, 
has been very good, they having made 
several installations during the week. 
Among these were several American 
boilers, but the majority were Canadian. 
They report that the feature of the week 
is the good demand for saw-mill outfits, 
the greater number of enquiries and or- 
ders- coming from New Ontario and 
Manitoba. For machine tools nothing 
very much can be said except that there 
have been a number of enquiries. 

The Levy, Weston & McLean Machin- 
ery, Co. report' that the demand for saw- 
mill and shingle mill outfits has been 
active this week, indeed they think it 
is somewhat surprising. Also wood- 
working machinery of nearly all kinds 
is finding a good sale. Boilers and en- 
gines also hold a prominent position on 
the market this week. There is not 
much doing in the other lines, although 
there have been not a few enquiries. 

The H. W. Petrie Machinery Co. say 
the market is much the same as last 
week, in that business consists chiefly 
of enquiries of which there have been 
even more than last week. However, 
during the last two or three days orders 
have begun to come in, and they expect 
that the business of the year has com- 
menced. After this week business will 
assume the proportions that have been 
predicted. The demand for boilers and 
engines has been good this week, but it 
has not been at all remarkable. 

Mr. Bertram, of the Bertram Engine 
Works, says that the demand for engines 
and boilers at the present time is very 
good. They have contracts on hand 
that will keep their plant in full opera- 
tion for some months. He says that 
everything' promises a continuance of 
19 



the good market for engines and boilers 
throughout the year. This is special I v 
true with respect to boilers. 

Mr. Jeffery, of the Poison Iron 
Works, says that they are quite busy at 
the present time, all departments having 
as much to do as can be conveniently 
handled. 

The Jones & Moore Electric Co. say 
that the market for dynamos and motors 
still remains quiet, and its features are 
similar to those of last week. They have 
been receiving numerous enquiries, but 
have not succeeded in booking many 
orders of importance. They are now 
working on orders placed during Decem- 
ber and the non-arrival of new orders 
is not affecting the factory to any great 
extent. 

The Dominion Motor Machine Co. 
have had numerous enquiries for their 
new gasoline engines, which they are 
putting on the market at the present 
time for use on farms, during the week, 
and they expect that there will be a good 
demand for them during the year. They 
have considerable automobile repair 
work on hand, the repair of several hav- 
ing been completed. 

The Consolidated Electric Co. say that 
orders and enquiries have been coming 
in very well indeed during the week, 
which is exceptional to the general mar- 
ket for electrical machinery. They sav 
tha< during the past two weeks they 
have installed a large number of dyna- 
mos for small lighting plants. The de- 
mand for mi tors has also been very 
good. They say they have not felt the 
general depression in the market in the 
least. As a result of their increasing 
business the Consolidated Company are 
looking for a larger plant than their 
present cue on Court street. 

MONTREAL. 

The turn of the year has not as yei 
had vevy much effect on the volume of 
actual business. It was not expected. 
however, that buyers would rush into 
the market immediately after changing 
calendars and most machinery men seem 
fairly well satisfied with the prospects 
for .1904. Actual business this week 
seems to have been confined almost en- 
tirelv to word-working machinery and 



Hard-ware arid 
Metal 



MACHINERY 



ma chine tools of various kinds. Some 
good business (for this season of the 
year) is reported by several Montreal 
houses. One or two small sales of boil- 
ers and engines have also been made 
early in the week. .Most of the saw- 
mills on the Ottawa are said to be still 
closed, the men not having recovered 
from the festivities of the holiday sea- 
son For this reason business which 
ordinarily is good at this time of the 
year with all these buyers is dead at 
present. 

A large number of enquiries are re- 
m ported this week and a number of sales 
seem likely to be made before long. 
There is, however, a disposition on the 
part of buyers to delay their purchases 
in the expectation of a drop in values. 
There is nothing in the Canadian situ- 
ation to justify any such expectations, 
but reports of a dull machinery market 
in the United States have created, a feel- 
ing of uncertainty in this country. There 
is, however, a growing feeling that the 
set-back to business in the United States 
can be regarded only as temporary' as 
> at bottom the condition of the country 
has remained sound. It is argued that 
the temporary set-back has really been 
beneficial as it resulted in a cheek to the 
unwise aggressiveness of labor which 
had become a menace to sound indus- 
trial conditions. The year 1903 has left 
to 1904 a vast amount of projected and 
unfinished work, and, unless the unex- 
pected happens, the United States should 
have a prosperous year. Eliminate the 
danger of a slump in values in the 
United States, and conditions in Canada 
can not fail to be satisfactory. 

At the same time, it is quite true that 
American machinery houses are pay- 
ing particular attention to the Canadian 
market just at present and there are 
this week in Montreal and vicinity an 
unusual number of American machinery 
men. Their presence here is having an 
unsettling effect on business for although 
it does not appear that they are offer- 
ing any startling price concessions they 
are at least preventing buyers from plac- 
ing their orders. A number of large 
orders for machine tools will be given 
very soon and unless concessions are of- 
fered by American travellers they are 
likely to go to Canadian houses. The 
failure of the James Cooper Mfg. Co. 
and the embarrassments of the Locomo- 
tive and Machine Company do not seem 
to have had any appreciable effect in 
keeping out United States competition. 
A number of English houses have also 
sen! their representatives to Canada to 



work this market and they have suc- 
ceeded in doing some business. A promin- 
ent machinery agents said to "Hardware 
and Metal " that he was considering the 
advisability of taking some new Eng- 
lish agencies. The only obstacle was the 
constitutional unwillingness of the Eng- 
lish manufacturer to change the patterns 
of his goods to suit the requirements of, 
new markets. 

The Fairbanks Company report actual 
business this week as not particularly 
active but from the number of enquir- 
ies received they believe that prospects 
for the new year are bright. A great 
many buyers are busy stock taking and 
are not anxious to place any orders for 
a few weeks yet, but they will be on the 
market before very long and are now 
making enquiries as to price. Actual 
business this week has been, for the 
must part, in machine tools. 

The Laurie Engine Company report 
business in engines of large and small 
horse-power quite up to the usual stand- 
ard. Trade in engines and boilers does 
not depend very much upon the season 
of the year and this year it was almost 
impossible to close down for legal holi- 



NEW VOKK. 

The Iron Age says of the New York 
market: Scarcely enough time has elaps- 
ed since the first, of the new year to fur- 
nish any indications as to the disposi- 
tion of prospective purchasers to throw- 
off the hesitancv which has character- 
ized their attitude* toward the market of 
late. It was not expected that thev 
would rush into the market immediately 
after changing calendars, and hence the 
trade does not attach especial signifi- 
cance to the quiet conditions which ex- 
isted throughout the week under review. 
Even though the greatly anticipated 
appropriations were made at the annual 
meetings, some time will be required 
before any appreciable effect can be felt 
in the trade. 

Large Bridge Span. 

THE accompanying cut is that of a 
large bridge span recently ship- 
ped from the bridge shops of the 
Canada Foundry, Toronto, to the New- 
port division of the C.P.R. What makes 
this of interest is the fact that it is the 
largest bridge span ever constructed in 
Toronto. The length over all is 85 feet 
4 inches; the depth, S feet 4 inches: and 
the total weight is S4.240 pounds, that 
is 240 pounds over 42 tons. This is the 




A 42- Ton Bridge Span, made by The Canada Foundry Company, Toronto. 



days. Prospects for engines and boil- 
ers are regarded as very good. In ma- 
chine tools and wood-working machin- 
ery business is quiet at pi-esent. 

Mr. W. H Nolan, of the Canadian Ma- 
chinery Agency, finds actual business 
this week fairly satisfactory and judg- 
ing from enquiries received he believes 
that 1904 will be a prosperous year in 
the machinery business. 

Mr. Alfred Rubra, of the Machinery 
Exchange, reports some improvement in 
this week's business. For the season of 
the year, he considers business this week 
very satisfactory and enquiries received 
point to g 1 trade later on. 

"Williams and Wilson report a quiet 
but satisfactory trade this week. Busi- 
ness this week shows some improvement 
over last and enquiries coming in point 
to a satisfactory trade later in the sea- 
son. 

2<i 



second large bridge span turned out by 

the Canada Foundry for the C.l'.R. with- 
in tln> last three months, the other one 
being not very much behind the one 
here illustrated. 



Bought a Planing Mill Plant. 

RE. MICKLESBOROUGH, imple- 
ment dealer, and Mi'. Mickle- 
h&rough, general merchant. Re- 
giua, N.W.T., were in Toronto this week. 
Miekleborough Bros, are starting a plan- 
ing mill at Kegina and have been plac- 
ing orders for machinery, equipment, 
etc. Their principal order, for machin- 
ery, etc.. to the value of over $4,000 was 
placed with the Levy. Weston & Mc- 
kean Machinery Co. The order includes 
a Wheelock engine and boiler, a planer 
and matcher as well as other wood- 
working machinery. 



MACHINERY 



Hardware and 
Metal 



Bread, Milk and Trade Checks 

Made of BRASS or ALUMINUM. 

SEND FOR PRICES 

STENCILS, STEEL STAMPS, 
RUBBER STAMPS, Etc.. 



Hamilton Stamp & Stencil Worts, 

HAMILTON, ONT. 

BUY 

KERR 

VALVES. 




They give 
satisfaction 
every time, 

Catalogue 
on application. 



TheKerr Engine Go. 



Walkerville, Ont. 



Blacksmiths' 

Hand 

Drills. 

The very 
best. 

A. B. JAROINE & CO. 
HESPELER, ONT. 




"Say, Friend," 

your aim should be to start up for yourself. 

Why Work 

from morn till night for somebody else instead of 
pushing a business for yourself and thus reap the full 
profit of your labor ? 

Wc Will 

start men of ability and good character in every 
County in the Dominion. 

WRITE FOR PARTICULARS TO 

The Empire Machine and Metal Stamping Co. 

1012 Yonge St. - TORONTO, 



BABBIT 



lotmuTY & price fa, mm 



N9o 

N9 I 

STAR 

SPECIAL "■ 

HERCULES 

METALLIC 

IMPERIAL 




a> 



(anada Metal (a 



William St. .TORONTO. telephone main 1729. 



LJV DIRECT AND SAVI 



IVIOIM 




We are the only Canadian Manufacturers of 

COLD PRESSED NUTS 

Square and Hexagon Finished, Semi-Finished, Case 

Hardened, Polished and Plated, Set Screws, 

Cap Screws, Thumb Screws. 




CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY, 



LIMITED, 



Head Office, 



TORONTO, ONT. 



District Offices — Montreal, Halifax, Ottawa, Winnipeg, Vancouver, Victoria, Rossland. 



-XV 



BRONZE / 

Al TVDr" f 



MANUFACTURERS 
PHOSPHOR TIN.PHOSPHOR 
I BRASS INGOTS NEEDLE METAL. TYPE 
I MElAiS ITC .BAR WlOE PLUMBERS 
I *« 8 TiNNEas SOLDERS. **o all 
WMITE METAL MIXTURES 




IMPORTERS Aftfj DEALERS IN 
I CIO TIN. PfG LEAD, INGOT COPPtR, 
! SPELTSR. ALUMINUM ANTIMONY, 

NiCMFL .bismuth 



*$& 



MANGANESE 



ANTI FRICTION METAL 

The Babbitt Metal that is based on scientific principles. 
IT'S DURABLE. IT'S RELIABLE. 

NONE GENUINE WITHOUT OUR SHIELD. 



Canadian Works, Montreal, P.Q. 
American Works, Syracuse, N.V. 
Head Office American Works, 94 Gold St.. New Vork. 



SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS 



Hardware and 
Metal. 



MACHINERY 



MODERN PRACTICE OF PATTERN MAKING. 



MORE and more attention is being 
given to the practice of pattern 
making. The following extracts 
from papers on the subject, ready by J. 
('. Warne and E. C. Fitzgerald, before 
the Pittsburg Foundrymen's Associa- 
tion, cover the essentials of the practice 
as it is now carried on. 

KINDS OF WOOD USED. 

White pine is almost universally used 
in the making of wood patterns, it being 
well adapted in its nature for such ser- 
vice. It is light, easy to cut, permits of 
a nice finish, retains its shape, does not 
warp oi- twist, like other varieties of fir 
woods and, if properly taken care of, 
will stand a good deal of wear, especi- 
ally if wrapping plates are provided. 
Yet while on account of its comparative- 
ly low cost, white pine is used almost 
universally for making wood patterns, 
as was before stated, it is not the most 
suitable for such purposes. Of all woods 
mahogany is the best, partaking of the 
nature of both hard and soft woods. It 
is practically impervious to daiup and, 
therefore, is certain to retain its origin- 
al shape. Its high cost, however, restrict 
its use to very special patterns. 

Among the hard woods cherry is most 
suitable for pattern making. It retains 
its shape fairly well, is not so hard to 
cut as the other hard \v^)ods, makes an 
excellent finish and stands ordinary wear 
and tear admirably. Patterns of white 
, pine faced up with cherry in the wear- 
ing parts will last for years under the 
hardest kind of service if kept well varn- 
ished. 

All lumber used in pattern work should 
be well seasoned, the naturally seasoned 
being much better than kiln dried. For 
standard patterns it will be found econ- 
omical to use the best lumber. It is no 
economy for the pattern maker to use 
in his work lumber from which the water 
oozes out in front of the chisel or flies 
about when turned in the lathe. 

The best finish on wood patterns is 
obtained by the use of the best gum 
shellac and grain alcohol, but the stand- 
ard article used for finishing is gum 
shellac varnish. 

Leather fillets are now used very 
hugely, and are very suitable for a quick 
job. However, for the best permanent 
pattern work there is nothing to surpass 
the wood fillet. Fillets of putty are also 
frequently used. They are easily put 
in and are inexpensive I but time must be 
given for the putty to harden; when 



varnished oxer putty forms a perm- 
anent, bard fillet. 

MACHINERY EMPLOYED. 

At the present time machinery plays 
a most, important part in the pattern 
shop, although that was not the case 30 
years ago. Then a circular rip saw, a 
hand saw and a lathe were about all ma- 
chine shop tools to be found in the or- 
dinary pattern shop, hand work was 
then a very large factor in the produc- 
tion of patterns. Now most pattern 
shops are, and all should be, equipped 
with the best machinery obtainable for 
the class of work required. 

The jointer is a most useful machine 
and a great labor saver. This machine 
should plane absolutely true, so that 
work can be glued up straight from the 
machine. It should take the place of 
the hand jointer plane from which it 
derives its name. A good band saw with 
wheels not less than 36 inches in diame- 
ter, provided with a -tilting table is also 
a very desirable machine. A small and 
large wood turning lathe should be pro- 
vided, also wood trimmers, a universal 
circular saw table and for large shops 
a swing cut off circular saw. The pony 
planer and surfacer are valuable ma- 
chines for dressing the lumber to the 
required thickness and shape. 

The band saw, with its tilting table, 
can be so adjusted that irregular shapes 
may be sawn to the line, thus dispens- 
ing with much hand labor as would be 
necessary without such a tool. The 
modern universal saw, with its many 
adjustments, saves time and material. 
For instance staves for barrel shaped 
patterns can be sawed just to the angle 
without any waste. This saw can also 
be used for making butt joints in sedge- 
ment work by fastening a form to the 
sliding table and using the cross-cut 
saw. It is also a great help in roughing 
out round core boxes. 

ASSEMBLING. 

After the material has been cut and 
shaped to convenient size for assembling 
the pattern it should be put together in 
a manner to offer the least resistance to 
the extraction from the mold. Where 
there is great depth and comparatively 
little draft it would be the best arrange- 
ment to have the grain of the wood 
run at right angles with the line of 
parting or on a line with the left. In 
extra heavy work, such as plates and 
bases for blowing engines, the most 
feasible form is to have the patterns 
made in sections, with guide strips so 
arranged that when assembled in the 
))it. all parts adjust themselves to their 



proper position. This relieves the strain 
on the pattern in drawing from the sand 
since each piece can be drawn out sep- 
arately. Patterns for pipe fittings are 
now made with flanges, branches and 
coie prints interchangable. This is an 
excellent plan, as it makes a compara- 
tively few patterns cover a wide range 
of sizes and shapes and overcomes to a 
certain degree, the old method of patch- 
ing, here and there, with pieces to get 
the size of casting wanted. 

Work should be screwed rather than 
nailed together where it is convenient to 
do so. Where glued joints are required 
hot glue is the best to use except in the 
case of thin wood where the cold pre- 
pared glues are probably the best, since 
the hot glue would tend to swell the 
wood which, upon drying, would change 
its shape. 

There are a class of metal dowel pins 
i n the market now which are a very 
great improvement over the old wood 
pins for parted patterns. 

FINISHING. 

The amount of time and labor to put 
upon the finishing of the patterns should 
be governed by the number of castings 
to be made from them. All patterns 
should be coated with shellac, varnish 
or some such preparation to protect 
them from the moisture and to give them 
a hard, smooth surface ; and those in 
use regularly _ should be revarnished 
from time to time. 

REQUIREMENTS OF A PATTERN MAKER. 

Accuracy should be the first law of 
every pattern maker. Speed is also a 
very important factor, but it should al- 
ways be kept subordinate to accuracy. 
In pattern making there must be ability 
of high order shown. The maker should 
have a knowledge of drawings; he 
should be able to read them truly and 
quickly; he should be no mean drafts- 
man, and the more his mathematics and 
knowledge of mechanics are developed 
the more fitting person will he be for 
his position. 

Transmission of Electricity. 

THE rapid approaching completion 
of the power houses in course of 
construction at Niagare Falls, is 
drawing much attention to the problem 
of long distance transmission of power, 
which problem must he mastered before 
the electricity generated from the Nia- 
gara will be of practical utility in On- 
tario municipalities. 

For this reason an article by Hamilton 
"Wright on "Power," referring to the 
Ray Counties Power Co.. Stockton. Cal., 
as the longest system of electric trans- 
mission in the world, is both instructive 
and readable. This transmission is 21!) 
miles in length being from Stockton to 
Oakland and San Francisco. This com- 
pany also have their lines extended up 
the coast to Burlingame, a distance of 
211 miles from Colgate, where the 
energy for that line is generated. The 
second longest system is that of the 
Standard Electric Company, also in 
California, the transmission being 200 



22 



MACHINERY 



Hard-ware and 
Metal 



miles in length. The power is generat- 
ed by water power obtained from the 
Mokelumne River, 40 miles below the 
Bine Lakes. Only within the last few 
months this company have established 
lines to Oakland, a distance of 122 miles, 
and to Sam Francisco, a distance of 146 
miles, and are transmitting 15,000 horse- 
power, at 60,000 volts. 

Electricity in mining' is proving of im- 
mense value, especially for gold and 
silver mines in the desert regions, where 
water is precious and fuel is costly. 

In Canada there are wide possibili- 
ties for the utilization of the power in 
our streams and rivers for industrial 
purposes. From all indications at the 
present time the energy . of the electric 
current is going to play no mean part 
in keeping up and increasing the rapid 
development of Canada's industries. Of 
course this electrical energy will be 
generated in the least expensive way, 
and with that end in view the energv 
gained by running or falling water will 
be utilized wherever possible. As an 
instance of this only some weeks ago 
the Dominion Government decided to 
send expert electricians to Europe to 
investigate the process of smelting ore 
in the electric furnace, so that, if the 
process prove commercially feasible, the 
iron ore deposits in certain parts of the 
province of Quebec, where there is no 
coal, but where there are numerous 
streams and rivers, may be developed 
by means of electrical energy generated 
by the water-power of these streams. 



^5 



$0 



^Orjsta/Q. 



RCGI 




\ 



1SOT ADULTERATED WITH EMERY. 

Polishing is fine grinding. Craig Mine Crystal Corundum 
grains will do from two to five times the amount of grinding 
or polishing that grains of emery will do, because it all 
grinds. Emery contains only 30 to 40 per cent, of grinding 
value, the remaining 60 to 70 per cent, is composed of iron 
and silica — waste material. 

WRITE FOR BOOKLET. 



The Canada Corundum Company, \m 



TORONTO, CANADA. 



We receive many orders 
each month from your ter- 
ritory for shafting. 

You might handle this busi- 
as well as not, and build up a 
substantial money-making trade 
if you wish. 

Write for details of our pro- 
position. 



;.Co. 

ITO, ONT. 



of Toronto, 
> Limited, 




INTERNATIONAL 
STOCK FOOD. 



INTERNATIONAL STOCK FOOD is being handled more and more 
every year by the hardwareman because he can sell it to an advantage, being 
constantly thrown in touch with the farmer. It will pay YOU to sell INTER- 
NATIONAL STOCK FOOD for there is no other line you can carry that 
will prove such a rapid seller and at the same time net you such a large per- 
centage of profit, and it is more extensively adve tised than any other Stock 

Food on the market. Write at once to the Canadian Factory, No. 4 
Bay Street, for special offer and catalogue. 

INTERNATIONAL STOCK FOOD CO., 



Largest Stock Food 
Factories in the world. 



INNEAPOLIS 

and 
TORONTO. 



Capital paid in 
$2,000,000.00 



•23 



i~l»rd-w« re and 
Metal 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



STOVES AND TINWARE. 



Get After Stove Trade. 

NOW when business is slack is the 
time to get out and hustle There 
are many lines which offer good 
returns for such enterprise. \im»n>; these 
stoves are worthy of considerable atten- 
tion. Many householders need to be con- 
vinced that they should get a dew stove ; 
that an old, out-of-date one is a cause 
of loss, using much more fuel to do the 
same work than does a new stove of 
good pattern. 

Hd« can these people be reached ? 
Many bardwaremen content themselves 
with drawing the attention of buyers by 
advertising. Some try window display 
to interest the public. Others, again, 
issue circulars for distribution to their 
customers. An increasing number of 
stove dealers are. however, more insis- 
tent. They make a point of personally 
interviewing everyone whom the> feel 

might possibly be persuaded to get a 
new stove. All the plans, and particu- 
larly the latter, are well worth trying. 

Soldering Flux. 

T^IJUlVI a series of articles bj John 
M Foggie, F.C.S., on "Experimental 
-■- Science for Plumbing Students," 
appearing in The Plumber and Decorator 
of. London, the following is taken: Sal 
ammoniac is a substance frequently used 
as a Mux in soldering copper, brass, etc. 
It is a chemical compound, built up of 
the two gaseous substances, ammonia 
and hydrochloric- acid. If a glass rod be 
moistened with spirit of salt and 
held over a vessel containing am- 
monia solution or gas. dense white fumes 
of ammonium chloride will be produced. 
It is a substance which, under ordinary 
circumstances, docs not liquify on heat- 
ing, but undergoes what the chemist 
calls ••dissociation'" — that is. it splits up 
into the two gases above mentioned, and 
when these reach a colder part of the" 
\essel, or escape into the air. they re 
combine to produce sal ammoniac. 

Its action ma.\ be shown by the follow 
ing experiments: Ileal a strip of clean 
sheet copper or brass over a Buiiseu 

burner. If the beating be done slowly 

and carefully it will be observed that a 
red color is at first produced. This is in 

all probability the lower oxide of copper 

CU20. If the beating be continued, a 

black coating, as we have already seen, 
of (he higher oxide (CuO) is finally pro- 
duced. This may readilj be separated 
from the copper by squirting a tine 
stream of water on it while hot. catch 
bur it in a saucer. Pour off the water 
and add a few drops of strong hydro 
chloric acid. The oxide will disolve, 
readily forming a \ cllow solution of 
cupric chloride Cu C12. H water be add 
ed it will become colorless, or. if the 
solution is a strong one. perhaps faintly 
green. To this add a few drops of am 
monia solution, when a blue color will 



be produced, indicating that the black 
substance dissolved was really a com- 
pound containing copper, as the ordinary 
salts of copper always give this color 
reaction with ammonia. 

Now, on a clean piece of copper pro- 
duce again this black oxide. While hot, 
sprinkle on a few grains of sal ammoniac 
and note what occurs. Wherever a tiny 
crystal touches the hot oxide it disperses 
it immediately, and the clean surface of 
the copper at once appears. The action 
then may be briefly indicated as follows : 
When the temperature is sufficiently ele- 
vated for the splitting up of the sal am- 
moniac already rcfered to (being about 
120 degrees C). the hydrochloric acid, 
being liberated ''on the spot," so to 
speak, at once attacks the oxide, with 
formation probably of both the chlorides 
of copper. This is at once attacked by 
the free ammonia and excess of ammon- 
ium chloride, and converted into what 
are called "double chlorides of ammonia 
and copper," which substances are vola- 
tile and go off in the escaping vapor. 
This may be proved by holding a Bunsen 
in the fumes an inch or two above the 
metal, when the flame will at once be 
turned a bluish green, indicating that 
volatile copper compounds are present. 

It is a very difficult matter, however, 
to follow actions such as this at high 
temperatures, but the above may be 
taken as pretty near the truth. The 
main fact to be borne in mind here also 
is that the oxide is removed by chemical 
means, and a perfectly clean surface pre- 
sented to the solder. The sal ammoniac 
possessing this high temperature of dis- 
sociation also ensures that the metal is 
effectively protected from the oxygen of 
the air during the soldering operation. 
Zinc chloride. Zn 012, is one of the most 
val liable of fluxes, and is used for cop- 
per, brass and iron. It is sometimes 
mixed with sal ammoniac for use in 
soldering, but it acts well of itself. The 
solid melts about 2fi0 degrees C. and, 
unlike sal ammoniac, is not volatile un- 
til a low red heat is reached. This prop- 
erty enables it to coat the surface to 
which it is applied as a fused mass, and 
thus prevent access of air at the temper- 
ature of the molten solder. Tt is a sub 
stance which takes up water and ab- 
sorbs oxygen readily, which latter prop- 
erty renders it valuable in this connec- 
tion. To illustrate its cleansing proper - 
tv. coat a strip of copper with oxide as 
before. While hot. rub over it a piece 
of solid zinc chloride, when it will be 
found that the oxide will be completely 
removed and the bright metallic- surface 
exposed 

\ similar experiment may be performed, 
using iron instead of copper. Take a 
piece of I in. hoop iron : file about 1 inch 
clean, and hold in the Bunsen flame till 
covered with a film of black oxide. Bub 
on as before a piece of the solid llux. 
keeping the iron still hot. After a min 
ute. plunge into cole] water, when a per 

fectly clean unoxidized metallic surface 

will In- the result. 

It has been stated (hat iron thus 

treated is coated with a thin film of 

/inc. which easily alloys with the solder. 

24 



Have you 
tried it ? 

Tried what ? 

SELLING 




This is in your line of business, and it will 
pay you. 

The Batty Stove ft Hardware Co 

76 YORK ST., TORONTO. 



MTaWoWS 




J. M. MAST MFG. CO.'S 

RAT and MOUSE TRAPS 

Strongest Traps Made. 

Prices Exactly Right. 

CANADIAN AGENTS 

Edwin H. Grenfell & Co., London, Ont. 




Wife-Cone 



Incan- 
descent 



Toaster 



Only perfect Bread Toaster for Gas 
or Gasoline Stoves. No smoky taste 
f to bread toasted on this toaster: 
Write for prices. 

H.O.Edy, Montreal. E.T.Wright ft Co., Hamilton. 

HARKINS & WILLIS, 

Manufacturers and Inventors, - Ann Harbor, Mich. 

Apply all the tests to 

STERNE'S ASBESTOS CEMENT 

and It will fill the bill every time 
Whether for durabiliiy or economy, satisfaction to 
the user, or saleability, it never fails to meet every re- 
quirement. Wiite for samples aid prices. 

Manufactured by G. F. STERNE, Brantford. 
For Sale by : J.H. Hanson, Mont real 

Batty Stove & Hardware Co., Torouto 



PAT. I88» 




The FAIRGRIEVE GAS TOASTER 

Retails at 25c. The only Toaster guaranteed to toast on 
gas, gasoline or blue flame oil stoves without taste or smell. 
Write for prices. 

THE FAIRGRIEVE MANTG. CO.. 

295 COLLEGE ST., TORONTO. 
U. S. Branch: 289 Jefferson Ave.. DETROIT. 

Never Drip a Drop 

-THE NEW TEA STRAINER 

Meets a popular need, A aide line you 
raimot affdtd to be wtthout. Retails at 
u> cents, 

£■'!« ™ Y Imperial Tea Strainer Co., 

TEA POT MONTREAL. 




Hardware tint. 



Ice 
Tools 



of all sorts. A 
good line for the 
hardware dealer. 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICE LIST 

ROBT. DONALDSON & SONS. 

30 You vtlle Square, - . MONTREAL. 





Victor' Flour Sifter 

WHEN BUYING SIFTERS 

BUY THE "VICTOR" AND YOU WILL 

HAVE THE BEST. 

E. T. WRIGHT & CO., 

HAMILTON and MONTREAL. 



STOVES AND TINWARE 

I'^^ ^LW J % El means perfection in 
m%0 ^^W I Li tne manufacture of 

Nickled-Plated Copperware 

A FULL LINE ALWAYS CARRIED IN STOCK IN WINNIPEG 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE, OR BETTER STILL, SEND US A SAMPLE ORDER 

Coltart & Cameron 



Special attention given to 
warehousing and distributing 
cars. 



Manufacturers' Agents and Warehousemen, 

141-143 Bannatyne Avenue, WINNIPEG. 



DIAMOND EXTENSION FRONT GRATE. 

Ends Slide in Dovetails similar to 
Diamond Stove Back. 

Diamond 

Adjustable Cook 

Stove Damper 




For Sale by Jobbers of Hardware. 



Manufactured by THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A 
" TAYLOR-FORBES CO., Limited. Guelpb, Ontario. 



ESTABLISHED I860. 



INCORPORATED 1895. 



DAVIDSON'S 



MILK CAN TRIMMINGS 
FOR 1904. 



(See how the Outer Rim and Inner are rolled in.) 




SECTION OF BOTTOM. 



This demonstrates the popularity of 

Davidson's 
Patent Milk Can Bottoms 

You should buy our Milk Cans and Trimmings, 
because : our Broad Hoop Bottom has all the advantages 
of a seamless bottom without the strain that spinning 
entails. The rim is turned in with edge of bottom, 
giving double durability and heavy rolled edges that will not tear factory floors nor waggons. 

They have no air spaces (which make soldering difficult) but sufficient space is left between bottom 
proper and rim to allow body of can to be inserted %. of an inch, making permanent joint. 

Bottoms are thus sweated in with half the solder." 

Bottoms are concave, draining to the centre, therefore are easier to wash out. 

They will not corrode like those which drain to the side. They have flush side handles. 

Top bands are " Shouldered " and have cut out at joint, making neater and cleaner job in half 
time than with old style hoop. 

Bottoms are rivetted to bottom hoop, as well as being rolled together. 

All bands have retinned edges. 

For durability, finish and economy in making up, our Trimmings are unequalled. 

The THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL 

25 




BROAD HOOP PATTERN. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BAR IRON 



and 



Rounds, Squares, Flats, Ovals, 
Y A Ovals, % Rounds, Nut Iron, Horse Shoe Iron, 
Tire Steel, Sleigh Shoe Steel, Toe Calk Steel, 
Soft Machinery Steel, etc., etc. 



THE PECK ROLLING MILLS Limited 



Cut Nails 
Wire Nails 
Horse Nails 




Horse Shoes 

Spikes 

Tacks 



BRANDS 



riEADomcE: 210 Coristine Building, MONTREAL 



works LACHINE CANAL. 



"Samson" Milk Can Trimmings. 



Strongest, neatest, most sanitary 
and only one-piece bottom made. 

Has no seams or rivets to cor- 
rode and collect dirt. 



Every bottom in each size is of an 
exact diameter. Being stamped out with 
a die — not spun — there can be no variation as in 
a bottom made in several pieces. 

Requires less solder and work in putting 
together than pieced bottoms — also wears longer. 




BODY 



Section of "Samson" Milk Can Bottom. 



The McClary Manufacturing Co. 

London, Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver, St. John, N.B. 



EVERYTHING FOR THE TINSHOP." 




PATENTEDJULY, 23, 1900 



26 



EDITORIAL 



H»rdw6rc and 
Metal 



HARDWARE UNO METAL 

President : 

JOHN BAYNB MACLEAN, 

Montreal. 

,h€ MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

OFFICES, 

Montreal - - - -232 McGill Street. 

Telephone Main 1255. 

TORONTO - - - 10 Front Street East. 

Telephone Main 2701. 

Winnipeg, Man. - Room 308, Mclntyre Block. 

Telephone 1846. 

E. C. Hind. 

L. P. Luxton. 

London, Eng. 100 Fleet Street, E.C. 

J. Meredith McKim. 

Manchester, Eng. - 92 Market Street. 

H. S. Ashburner. 

St. John, N.B. - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 

New York - Room 1241 New York Life Bldg. 

W. T. Robson. 
Vancouver, B.C. - Geo. S. B. Perry. 

Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere- - - 12s 

Published every Saturday. 
Cable Address l^P^ondon. 



PROSPEROUS CANADA. 

REMARKABLE evidence of the pros- 
perity now prevailing throughout 
C&nada is evidenced in Rradstreets of 
January 9th. A summary of the failures 
which have been recorded each year in 
Canada since 1880 shows that in 1903 
lint 956 Canadian firms suffered failure, 
liabilities aggregating $8,328,362 and 
assets $3,852,197. This is a decrease in 
number of 12 per cent, from 1902 and is 
the leasl number since 1882. 

A further evidence of prosperity is 
noted iii our bank clearings which for 
ten cities aggregated $2,646,974,767, a 
yain of 5.2 per cent, over 1902, and to 
this extent the best ever recorded. In 
connection with this it must he remem- 
bered that the demoralized condition of 
tin slock market must have seriously 
affected the hank clearings, so that our 
industrial prosperity is by 110 means 
adequately represented even by the bank 
clearings. 

To emphasise this it should be noted 
that the total hank clearings in 92 United 
States cities aggregated $103,691,335,283, 
a decrease of 7.4 per cent, on 1902 and 



7.7 per cent, on 1901. This decrease is 
found to originate in New York the centre 

ol the stuck operations, the outside cities 

marking an increase. 

It is most gratifying indeed in find 
t! at despite the hard knocks Canadian 
securities have received during the past 
year at the hands of American hears we 
are still in a position to make so favor 
able a showing. 

The inference is flattering to our in- 
dustrial and commercial stability. 



TO FIGHT TRADING STAMPS. 

r I > HE Merchants' Association of New 
A York are issuing a circular ap- 
pealing to the trade to co-operate in a 
determined attempt to secure the pass- 
; y by the New York Legislature of a 
. iii to regulate trading stamps in such 
manner as to abolish ther present harm- 
IV,' effects. 

Canadan merchants will sympathize 
with the trade in this attempt. The 
trading stamp evil was hut a few years 
ago such a pernicious influence in busi- 
ness conditions that it was found an easy 
lr after to secure practical unanimity in 
t!,e movement to have them abolished, 
in Ontario particularly. The agitation 
against the stamps was started by the 
MacLean Trade Newspapers and the 
movement to secure legislation against 
them originated in Brockville. Delega- 
tions from all parts of Ontario met in 
Toronto and interviewed the Government 
ia a body. This, together with a short 
but powerful lobby, was sufficient to win 
the almost unanimous support of mem- 
bers of the Legislature, which resulted 
in the passage of an act which has been 
so effective that trading stamps are a 
' ■ thing of the . past ' ' in the province. 
May similar success attend the efforts 
of the New York Merchants' Associa- 
tion. 

STOCK FOODS FOR HARDWARE 
STORE. 

HARDWARE & METAL has been a 
consistent believer in and advocate 
of the principle that hardware merchants 
should make it their practice to carry as 
many lines of specialties as can be carried 
to advantage, 

27 



At this season of the year, when regula 
business is less active than usual, the 
retailer has more time to plan business- 
increasing campaigns for the year and to 
find out what lines not being carried 
could be advantageously added to his 
stock-in-trade. 

Recent years have demonstrated the 
suitability of many lines of specialties for 
the hardware trade. One of these lines 
is stock foods. There is a large and in- 
creasing demand for these foods in all 
parts of the Dominion where stock-raising 
has become one of the chief interests of 
the farming community. 

Inasmuch as the real success of stock 
raising is dependent on the attention 
devoted to it, stock foods can be depended 
on to interest the average farmer ; and, 
moreover, can be depended on to yield a 
good profit to the hardwareman as the 
margin of profit is considerably larger 
than that of regular hardware lines. 



PRICE CHANGES OF THE WEEK. 

THE advances this week" are both due 
to rising prices in the country of 
production, the United States. The in- 
crease of cotton quotations has lead to 
another rise of 2c. in sashcord prices. 
Turpentine has been marked up He. per 
gal. as a result of manipulative advances 
in the Savannah market. This change 
puts prices of turpentine on the Canadian 
market fully 10c. above the quotations 
ruling this week last year. 



THE LATE W. H. LINDSAY. 

IT is with feelings of the deepest sorrow 
that we have this week to record the 
death of Mr. W. H. Lindsay who was 
taken off with such terrible suddenness 
while removing snow from in front of his 
residence at London on Friday last. Mr. 
Lindsay bad been for some time connected 
with the staff of the MacLean Trade 
Newspapers and was held in the highest 
esteem by all those connected therewith as 
he was, indeed, by all who knew him. 

Mr. Lindsay had a long business career 
in Milton and his loss will be widely felt. 
He was a fine example of the gentlemanly 
type of a business man, a type of man 
whose loss we feel keenly. A widow and 
several sons and daughters survive, to 
whom we extend our heartfelt sympathy 
in their bereavement. 



Hardwftt-fe ano 



EDITORIAL 



A TRADE UNION ABSURDITY. 



Fh'OM St. Louis came, some little 
time ago, a story which surely 
illustrates the climax of trade union ab- 
surdity. As is well known, the manage- 
ment of the Exposition are paying par- 
ticular attention to the art features of 
the Fair. For example, the sum of 
$500,000 has been appropriated for the 
display of the work of American sculp- 
tors, and a great number of artists have 
contributed under the direction of Mr. 
Kail Bitter, the chief ol the sculpture 
department. As many of these nieces 
•>f statuary are of colossal proportions, 
they are transported to St. Louis in sec- 
tions and the work of setting up neces- 
sarily requires some considerable skill. 
It often happens that the pieces are 
damaged en route and need remodelling, 
as do the joints where the sections meet. 
Surely it is evident that to place this 
work in the hands of unskilled persons 
is to run the risk of spoiling the sculp- 
tors' work. Enthusiastic young artists 
have worked in poverty inspired" by the 
hope of achieving fame and distinction 
by their work and upon the verdict of 
critics and public depends their imme- 
diate future. To spoil their work in set- 
ting it up would be an injustice to them, 
and render useless the vast expenditure 
of money by the management on these 
artistic features of the Exhibition. 

Now the management of the Exhibi- 
tion were careful not to wound the feel- 
ings of organized labor. The work of 
setting up this statuary was assigned to 
the best sculptors of the St. Louis Mod- 
ellers' and Sculptors' Union No. 245, 
thereby recognizing the claims of organ- 
ized labor and at the same time seeking 
efficiency. 

But this action was not in harmony 
with the principles of organized labor 
as understood in St. Louis. A union 
had been recognized, but it was not the 
right union. The statues are modelled in 
plaster and forsooth the proper men to 
set them up are the plain plasterers of 
St. Louis. The Plasterers' Union noti- 
fed the Exhibition authorities that this 



work must be turned over to them, at 
the same time threatening a general 
strike of the Exposition workmen unless 
the demand were complied with. Mean- 
while the plain plasterers ceased their 
work on the buildings. 

The dispute was referred to the Di- 
rector of Public Works and his common 
sense decision was in favor of the claims 
of the Sculptors' Union. This finding 
not being satisfactory to the plasterers 
was ignored as completely as the similar 
\erdict of the Missouri State Board of 
Arbitration to which the dispute was 
then referred. This body went into the 
whole question carefully, listening to the 
representations of the Plasterers' Union 
and to the case of the Sculptors' Union 
as presented by the Exposition authori- 
ties. The finding being adverse to the 
Plasterers' Union they refused to be 
bound by it. 

In despair Mr. Bitter, the superinten- 
dent of sculpture, at last addressed an 



If you would do what you could 

—in advertising, 
You could do what you would 

—in business. 



appeal to the general president of the 
Operative Plasterers' International As- 
sociation of the United States and Can- 
ada, Mr. J. B. Cavanaugh, of Colorado 
Springs, Colorado, in which he set forth 
the case plainly and fairly and appeal- 
ed to the common sense of this august 
personage to interfere in his behalf. He 
waited more than a month for a reply 
and when received it was a curt notifica- 
tion to the following effect: 

Dear Sir. —The following decission was sent 
to this office by the General President of the OP. 
I. A. That plasterers shall do all pointing, and to 
notify locals. Locals referred to are No. 245, 
which is composed of modellers, No. 242 composed 
of shop hands, and No. 3 which is composed of 
plasterers. Said notice has been sent. Trusting 
that the above decission will end controversy, I- 
remain, W. A. O'Keefe, Sec'y-Treas. 

This is perhaps a fair sample of the 
curtesy for which employers may look 
at the hands of some labor leaders. 



What has not the union done for the 
laboring man? Long ago it was claimed 
that it would give him shorter hours, in- 
creased wages, and greater considera- 
tion in the eyes of the world. Skilled 
labor, we were told, would rise in the 
social scale under the protecting aegis of 
trade unionism. But not its most ard- 
ent and enthusiastic advocates a half 
century ago would have ventured to 
prophesy that so soon would unionism 
have accomplished the hitherto impos- 
sible task of democratizing art. Let the 
"ame of J. B. Cavanaugh of Colorado 
Springs be held in all esteem. By one 
stroke of his pen, this mighty potentate 
of unionism has placed the members of 
that union of plain plasterers on the 
same plane as the most noted artists of 
the New World. Adams, Ruckstuhl, Bit- 
ter and MacMinnies are now brothers 
to the distinguished aidsts of the Plas- 
ters' Union No. 3. Many are the tri- 
umphs of science and of art which the 
wondering visitor at St- Louis next Sum- 
mer will stop to admire. But surely no- 
thing is more worthy of his admiration 
than the latest triumph of the plain 
plasterers in plastic art. 



HONORED BY THEIR TOWNSMEN. 



MANY business men we 
the Ontario munici 



cere honored at 
jnicipal elections 
with the selection as Chief Magistrate in 
their town or city. Among those in which 
Hardware and Metal readers are in- 
terested are : 

Adam Beck, lumber merchant, Mayor of Lon- 
don. 

W. W. Chown, hardware merchant, Mayor of 
Belleville. 

F. M. Devine, hardware merchant, Mayor of 
Renfrew. 

A. W. Humphries, hardware merchant, Mayor 
of Parkhill. 

W. Lawson, carriage manufacturer, Mayor of 
undas. 

M. S. Madol, saw miller, Mayor of Napanee. 

S. L. McKay, hardware merchant, Mayor of 
Kingsville. 

W. E. McKeough, foundryman. Mayor of 
Chatham. 

W. H. Plummer, general and hardware mer- 
chant, Mayor of Sault Ste. Marie. 

D. Wilson, planing miller, Mayor of Colling- 
wood. 

C. W. Winslow, builder, Mayor of Dunnville. 



28 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



A RETAIL HARDWARE DEALER'S 
CIRCULAR. 

DECISION of character is one of the 
best assets that could be possessed 
by a business man. The larger the busi- 
ness interests, the more valuable this asset, 
but its value is obvious whether the in- 
terests be great or small. 

Hardware and Metal has frequently 
suggested that the retail trade insist on 
prompt payment. It seems clear that the 
era of short credits has dawned, that re- 
tailers have learned the wisdom of insist- 
ing on prompt payments, as well as of 
making prompt payments themselves. 

From D. Brocklebank, retail hardware 
dealer, Arthur, Ont., comes to hand a 
circular, such as might be issued by every 
retail hardware dealer in the country. Oi\ 
the first page of the circular were greet- 
ings for 1904 ; on the fourth page an 
interesting list of the lines carried. The 
inner pages, the second and third, are the 
ones, however, which are worthy of atten- 
tion. 

Dear Friend, — At the closing of the old year 
we wish to thank you for favors and patronage, 
and as the new year opens to solicit your continued 
favors for 1904. 

We trust that the old year has crowned you 
with success, that you have something substantial 
to show for your labors and that you have plenty 
of health and energy to enter upon the work of 1904. 

We are pleased to announce that 1903 has been 
a banner year in our business. It is, indeed, great 
satisfaction to see each year better than the one 
before, and we naturally look for the reasons. We 
believe there are several. Years ago we framed a 
motto : " Not how cheap, but how good." Cus- 
tomers have appreciated our efforts to sell only 
reliable goods at right prices. Then the bringing 
of so many lines of merchandise under our roof 
has reduced the cost of selling and has enabled us 
to always meet and usually undersell our com- 
petitors. Our long experience enables us to find 
the best place to buy and we buy in large quanti- 
ties for cash. These reasons, coupled with a reso- 
lution to deal fairly with all men, has, we beiieve, 
been responsible for our growing business. 

During the past year manufacturers and whole- 
sale hardware people have shortened the terms of 
credit, shortened them so that by the time we get 
goods unpacked and marked the bill is due. Our 
business has become so large that we can no longer 
pay cash for goods and carry our customers' 
accounts to the end of the year. Our capital will 
not permit it and we are forced to adopt the cash 
system, that is cash or note. In special cases 
such as a person building, we will allow short 
credit, but in all cases accounts must be settled by 
cash or note every three months, viz., on the first 
days of April, July, October and January. Under 
no circumstances will this rule be violated. 

When you have carefully considered this mat- 
ter, do you think it is reasonable to expect a mer- 
chant to loan you goods for a year (which is the 
same as money) and receive no consideration for 
the same ? 

Possibly you have never asked credit at our 
store ; in that case our terms will not interest you. 
It will interest you, however, to know that for 1904 
we are planning for bigger business, better service, 
and, where possible, lower prices. 

On January 1st we opened a new ledger. We 
want to close every account by the 15th. Enclosed 
find note at three months for the amount of your 

account, $ bearing interest at 8 per cent. 

per annum. Kindly give this your prompt atten- 
tion. 

Again thanking you for past favors, and wishing 
you 366 days of good luck for 1904, I remain, 
Respectfully yours, 

D. BROCKLEBANK. 

The argument that the shortening of 
credits by wholesalers and manufacturers 



necessitate quick collection of accounts by 
retailers than formerly is one that can and 
should be made by hardwaremen in every 
section of the country. 



M 



WAYLAND WILLIAMS. 

R. WAYLAND WILLIAMS, whose 
portrait we reproduce below, is 
is one of the latest additions 
to the ranks of the Montreal manufac- 
turers' agents, but he is a man who 
scarcely needs any introduction to Mont- 
real business circles, as for 12 years or 
more he has been favorably known 
throughout the city. Mr. Williams is 
now making- an independent , business 
venture after a record in postions of 
trust under large firms of which any 
man might be proud. 

An Englishman by birth, Mr. Wil- 
liams had five years' experience before 
coming to Canada with the Patent Nut 
and Bolt Company of Birmingham, now 




Mr. Wayland Williams. 

Guest, Keen & Nettlefolds. On coming 
to Canada, he was for some time in the 
service of the Grand Trunk Railway, 
with which he severed his connection to 
take the responsible position of secre- 
tary of. the Laurie Engine Company, of 
Montreal. Mr. Williams has the good 
wishes of his former- employers in his 
independent venture, and from them he 
holds letters of recommendation show- 
ing- in what high esteem he is held by 
tli cm. 

Mr. Williams has been very fortunate 
in securing an agency from John Birch 
& Co., of London, England, one of the 
largest and enterprising' firms for which 
London is noted. Our readers may re- 
member a review in these columns last 
September of the magnificently illus- 
tinted catalogue issued by this firm, one 
oJ the finest ever published. 'John Birch 
& Co. have been in business for more 
29 



than 25 years as buyers on commission 
and merchants selling on firm otter, en- 
gineering materials, supplies and stores, 
machinery, tinplates, Canada plates, pig 
iron, steel, wire etc. They export large- 
ly to India, China, Japan, Australia, 
South Africa, and have also a well es- 
tablished connection in Canada, buying 
l.i many Canadian firms. 

Mr. Williams has secured offices at 2(j 
Si. Sacrament street, Montreal, and is 
now open for business. He would he 
pleased to secure agencies for Canadian 
;.nd American manufacturers as well as 
English. In addition to the firm of John 
Birch & Co., Mr. Williams also repre- 
sents the following firms: 

Morrison & Ingram, Manchester Eng- 
land, sanitary engineers. 

Roberts Patent Filling- Machine Com- 
pany, Bolton, England, filling machines. 

Omega Odourless Gas Stove Co., Bris- 
tol, England, Omega Odourless Stoves. 

A. Savy Jean — Jean & Co., Paris 
France, soap making and pharmaceu- 
tical machines. 

Geo. Campbell, London, England, gen- 
eral merchant. 

Allen" & Son, Sheffield, England, cut- 
lery and electroplates. 

Mosely's cutlery, Sheffield, England. 

A. C." Wells &'Co., London, England, 
unbreakable industrial lamps, oil niters, 
painting machines, lime and color wash- 
ing machines. 

Imperial Tea Strainer Company, 
Montreal, " Never Drip a Drop " tea 
stiainer. And some others. 

Mr. Williams is also concluding- ar- 
rangements to take an agency for Ad. 
Arbenz, of Lousanne, Switzerland, 
" Mandarin " razors. 



INQUIRIES FOR CANADIAN TRADE 

THE following were among the recent 
inquiries relating to Canadian trade 
received at the Canadian Government 
office in London : 

1. A London contractor and importer is looking 
out for Canadian supplies of hemlock or pine rail- 
way ties and maple and hickory skewers. 

2. A resident of Belfast claiming to have a good 
connection with the wholesale and retail trades in 
the North of Ireland, has requested to be furnished 
with names of Canadian exporters of bacon, cheese 
and butter. 

3. A firm of manufacturers and publishers of 
chromo almanacs, show cards, etc., desires to hear 
from wholesale printers and stationers in Canada 
likely to take up their goods. 

4. Inquiry is made respecting the possibility of 
opening up a trade with Canada in writing inks 
and a pure rice starch. 

5. A West of England firm of brush manufac- 
turers and dealers in woodenwa- e are seeking sup- 
plies of broom and fork handles in basswood. 
They also import washing boards, clothes pegs and 
other similar woodenware. 

6. A Belfast firm would like to correspond with 
Canadian exporters of produce, fruit, cheese, 
hams, canned goods, etc., with a view to selling 
these goods on commission among buyers in Ire- 
land where a large and safe trade is to be done. 

7. A well-known firm of glue manufacturers 
wish to get into touch with Canadian buyers of 
this article. 

[The names of those making inquiries 
may be obtained from the Editor of The 
Canadian Grocer. I 



Hardware and 

Metal 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 
Montreal, January 15, 1904. 
Hardware. 

THE weekly round of the whole- 
sale establishments of Mont- 
real shows that trade has not 
vet emerged from the stagna- 
tion of the holiday season. 
The travellers are all on the road again 
but as yet they have not succeeded in 
sending in many new orders. This is 
ascribed to the fact that numbers of re- 
tailers—perhaps the majority— are still 
slock taking and until this operation is 
concluded not much business can be ex- 
pected. The most important price change 
since last issue is a drop of 15 cents per 
keg on cut nails, which are now quoted 
at $2.30 per keg, f.o.b. Montreal. Wire 
nails remain unchanged. There has 
been an increased business in barb and 
galvanized wire since the price changes 
recorded in our last issue were an- 
nounced. Numerous orders for forward 
delivery have been booked during the 
last 10 days. It is stated on what seems 
to be good authority that there are now 
On- American bolts and nuts being offer- 
ed on this market. The better feeling 
across the line coupled with the higher 
discounts on Canadian made bolts has 
shut out American competition. In cord- 
age, the chief interest seems to centre 
around all cotton goods. No further 
changes arc reported this week, but 
prices as quoted are very firm. It is 
stated that Canadian manufacturers will 
uof make this year any cheap two-ply 
hall-inch and three-quarter-inch rubber 
hose. Supplies of this grade in the 
hands of the jobbers are not very large 
and it will be difficult to obtain this sea- 
son. The cheapest will be the 3-ply in 
half-inch and three-quarter-inch hose. 
A special brand of this is being put on 
the market at 75 and 10 per cent, off 
list. Other grades will be firm, 10 to 
!"> per cent, higher than last year. 

Spring Hinges — Trade is now opening 
up nicely, good orders being booked for 
forward delivery. Prices for this sea- 
son are as follows: No. 5. $17.25 per 
gross; No. 10, $18 per gross; No. 20, 
$10.50; Xo. 120, $20; No. 51, $9.25; No. 
50, $27.50. 

Wire Nails— No change was made last 
week in the price of wire nails. Trade 
is now very quiet, there being nothing 
doing except an occasional sorting or- 
,lei which is tilled out of slock. The 
local mills are all closed down for stock 
taking and repairs to machinery. We 
again quote as follows: $2.40 per 
keg in carlots, and $2.45 per 
keg in small lots f.o.b. Gananoque, 
Montreal, London, Hamilton, Toronto, 
Brantford, Windsor, Ont.. and St. John. 



Cut Nails — A reduction of 15 cents 
1 er keg- has been made since our last 
issue. It has been felt that in compari- 
son with wire nails prices for cut nails 
were high. Trade is at present very 
quiet. The price is now $2. HO per keg 
_ f.o.b. Montreal. 

Fence Staples — A few orders are be- 
ing hooked for forward delivery, hut 
trade has not yet opened out to any great 
extent. The outlook for 1904 business 
is considered very satisfactory, particu- 
larly in Manitoba and the Northwest 
where more attention is now being paid 
to fencing and where it is expected that 
large sales will he made during 1904. 
We quote the following prices: $3 per 
100-lb. keg for galvanized, and 
$2.80 for bright; 25 to 50-lb. packages, 
25c extra. 

Pressed Spikes— The discount is 25 
per cent. 

Horsenails— There is very little activ- 
ity at present. Prices are unchanged and 
v e again quote the following discounts : 
"M" brand, "Oval" and "New City" 
heads, 55 per cent.; "Countersunk" 
heads, 55 per cent.; "C" brand, 40, 10 
and 71-2 per cent, off; "Monarch," 50 
and 71-2 per cent, and "Peerless," 50 
per cent. 

Horseshoes — There is nothing of in- 
terest to note this week. Trade is quiet. 
We again quote as follows: Iron shoes, 
light and medium pattern, No. 2 and 
larger, $3.65; No. 1 and smaller, $3.90; 
snow pattern, No. 2 and larger, $3.90; 
No. 1 and smaller, $4.15; light 
steel shoes, No. 2 and larger, 
$3.80; No. 1 and smaller, $4.05; 
featherweight, all sizes, to 4, $5.35; 
toe weight, all sizes, 1 to 4, $6.60. Shoes 
more than one size in a keg, 10c. per keg 
extra f.ob. Montreal onlv. 

Sleighbells — A few sorting orders are 
still being received, but trade is quiet 
after the rush which preceded the holi- 
days. We quote as follows: Back straps, 
30c. to $2 each ; bodv straps, 70c. to 
$2.50 each ; shaft gongs, 2 bells, 20c. ; 3 
bells, 35 to 60c. ; 4 bells, 55c. to $3 each ; 
brass team bells. No. 1, $1.90 per dozen; 
No. 2, $2.40 per dozen ; No. 3, $2.70 per 
dozen ; No. 4, $3.70 per dozen ; No. 5, 
$4.65 per dozen; York eye bells, No. 10, 
$1.35 per dozen; No. 12. $1.65; No. 14, 
$1.90; saddle gongs, $1.10 to $3 each. 
' Skates — There is now little activity 
in the wholesale trade. Except for a 
lew sorting orders there is nothing do- 
ing in skates at present. A number of 
sizes have been almost entirely sold out 
and are difficult to obtain. Our quo- 
tations are as follows: Halifax 
pattern, 37c. per pair,; nickel-plated, 
65c: ladies' nickel-plated, 55c. to $1.25; 
ladies' concave nickel-plated, $1.45; 
plain hockey, 27c to $1.35; nickel-plated 
hockey, 60c. to $2.50; double end hock- 

30 



ev, $1.65 to $3. Skate straps, 70c to 
$1.35. 

Hockey Sticks— As in skates, whole- 
sale business for the season of 1903-04 
•is now practically over. Although prices 
or all wooden goods are advancing, one 
or two houses have been offering spe- 
cial price concessions on their stock of 
hockey sticks in order to clear. Nom- 
inally prices are unchanged and we 
again quote the following prices: 
Best second-growth goalkeeper's, $3.80 
oer dozen; ash, $2.70; elm, $2.18; boys' 
elm, $1.10. Regulation pucks, $1.50 per 
dozen; boys', $1.15 per dozen. 

Fire Shovels— Still in seasonable de- 
mand. We quote: No. 70, 39c per 
dozen ; No. 55, 55 to 82c per dozen ; No. 
57. 82c to $1.10 per dozen; No. 60, 70 
to 88c per dozen; No. 65, $1.10 to $1.23 
per dozen; Duplex, No. 7, 96c per doz. ; 
No. 9, $1.20 per dozen; No. 11, $1.54 per 
dozen. 

Snow Shovels— In seasonable request 
at unchanged prices. We quote the fol- 
lowing prices: " Habitan V $2.50 
to $2.75 oer dozen; "Victor," 30 per 
cent, off: steel railroad shovels, 45 per 
cent. off. 

Screen Wire Cloth — Orders are now 
being booked freely for forward deliv- 
ery at the advance noted in our last 
issue. The price is $1.50 per 100 square 
feet, an advance of 71-2 cents on the 
price first announced. 

Rubber Hose— A few inquiries are re- 
ported this week. It is stated that the 
general range of prices for 1904 will he 
from 10 to 15 per cent, in advance of the 
prices which obtained last year. Cheap 
rubber hose (2-ply) 1-2-inch and 3-4- 
inch will not be made this season by the 
Canadian manufacturers. The cheap- 
est kind made this year will be the 3- 
ply in 1-2-inch and 3-4-inch sizes. A 
special brand of this quality is being 
offered at 75 and 10 per cent, off list. 

Galvanized Coil Spring Wire— A fair 
business is reported this week at the 
following prices: Nos. (i. 7 and 8, $3.20; 
No. 9. $2.70; No. 10. $3.30; No. 11. 
$3.35: No. 12. $2.95 : No. 13. $3.10. Car 
lots 5 cents less. Freight prepaid in less 
than car lots to extent of 25 cents and 
in car lots to extent of 20 cents. For 
following factory points t'i eight is equal- 
ized: Montreal. Hamilton. London, Wel- 
land, Windsor, Stratford. 

Galvanized Wire— The reduction of 5 
cents noted in our last issue has made 
conditions more settled and has been fol- 
lowed by the booking of a few orders 
during this week. ft is expected thai 
from now on trade will be brisker. 
We quote: No. 5, $3.65; Nos. 6, 7 
and 8, $3.10; No. 9, $2.45; No. 10. $3.15: 
No. 11. $3.20; No. 12. $2.60: No. 13. 
$2.70: No. 14. $3.70. In carlots f.o.b, 
Cleveland. No. 5, $2.15; Nos. li. 7. 8 and 



THE MARKETS 



M. 



e and 

Moi.l 



0, $2.10; No. 10, $2.15; No. 11. $2.20; 
No. 12. $2.25; No. 13. $2.35; No. 14. 
$2.45. Ju less than earlots, 12.1-2'c. 
extra per 100« lbs. will be eharged. 

Barb Wire— The above remarks apply 
aiso to barb wire, a few good orders for 
which have been booked for forward de- 
livery since I lie announcement of new 
prices. Prospects are blight for a brisk- 
trade during 1904 in Manitoba and the 
Northwest. We quote as follows: $2.75 
per 100 lbs. f.ob. Montreal and $2.50 
f.o.b. Cleveland. Carlots of 15 tons. 
$2.40 f.o.b. Cleveland. 

Smooth Steel Wire — There is nothing 
i:ew to report this week. Prices are un- 
changed and we again quote as follows: 
Bright and annealed, $2.50 per 100 lb. 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Halifax, Lon- 
don. Hamilton and St. John. Net ex- 
tras per 100 lb. are now as follows: 
Coppered wire, 60c. ; tinned wh - e, $2 ; 
oiling, 10c: spring wire, $1.25; best 
steel wire, 75c. ; bright soft-drawn, 15c. ; 
hay-baling' wire, 20 to 25c. 

Fine Steel Wire— Trade is quiet at 
nresent. The discount continues 25 ner 
cent, with net extras as follows : 1 and 
2-lb. hanks, 25c. per 100 lb.; 1-2-lb. 
hanks, 371-2c, and 1-4-lb. hanks, 50c. 

Brass Wire— Business is fair at un- 
changed discount, viz., 60 per cent. 

Copper Wire— Business fair: discount 
60 per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs — Jn rivets and buns 
there is now little or no activity and the 
market is without any features of spe- 
cial interest. We again quote the fol- 
lowing discounts: Best iron rivets, 
section carriage and wagon box, 
black rivets, tinned do., cqopei's' rivets 
and tinned swede rivets, 60 and 10 per 
cent.: swedes iron burrs are quoted at 
55 per cent, off; copper rivets with the 
usual proportion of burrs, 45 per cent, 
off and coppered iron rivets and burr*, 
in 5-lb. carton boxes are quoted at 60 
and 10 per cent, off list. 

Bolts and Nuts— It is stated on good 
authority that there are now no Ameri- 
can bolts and nuts offering on this mar- 
ket. Prices were not interfered with at 
'lie meeting of the bolt manufacturers 
held in Toronto last week and we 
again quote the following discounts: Car- 
riage bolts, common ($1.00) list, 3-16 
and 1- ! diameter, 60 per cent. : carriage 
bolts, common ($1.00') list. 5-16 and 
3=6 diameter, 55 and 5 per cent.; car- 
riage bolts, common ($1.00) list, 7-16 
diameter and up, 55 per cent.; carriage 
bolts, full square ($2.40) list, 60 pei 
cent.: carriage bolts. Norway iron 
($3.00) list, 60 per cent.; machine bolts. 
3t8 diameter and under. 60 per cent.: 
leachine bolts. 7-16 diameter and larger. 
55 and 5 per cent.: plow bjdts, 55 and 
5 per cent.; blank bolts, 55 and 5 per 
cent.: bolt ends. 55 and 5 per cent.: 
sleigh shoe bolts, 70 per cent.: coach 
screws, cone point, 70 per cent.: nuts, 
souare. all sizes. 4c. per lb. off: nuts. 
hexagon, all sizes. 4 1-4c per lb. off. 

Wpsjiprs. 4.-, ,, ei . cei) t fp 

Cutlerv — Trade is confined almost en- 
tirely this week to sorting orders. 



Screws— We quote the following dis- 
counts: Round head bright, $82 1 -'- 
per cent.; flat' head bright, 871-2 
per cent. ; brass, round head, 75 per 
cent.; brass, flat head, 80 per cent. 

Shot — Trade is dull and there is no- 
thing to note. We again quote: Ordin- 
ary drop shot, A. A. A. to dust, $6.50 per 
100 lb.; chilled, Nos. 1 to 10, $7 per 100 
lb.; buck and Seal, $7.50 per 100 lb.; 
ball, $8 per 100 lb. Trade discount 
17 1-2 per cent, f.o.b Montreal, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London, St. John, N.B., and 
Halifax. 

Lanterns We quote as follows; 
Lift, hinged or tilt, $4 to $4.25 per doz. ; 
cold blast No. 2, $7 to $7.50; painted 
dashboard, $6.50 to $6.75: plain dash- 
board, $6 to $6.25; searchlight, $20 to 
$24 doz.; brass cold blast, small, $9.75 
to $10. 

Cordage— In cordage the feature pf 
interest is the continued strength of all 
cotton goods. There has been no actual 
advance since our last issue, but prices 
are very firmly maintained at the liie.li 
figures quoted below. Manila hemp is 
being firmly held and prices of rope are 
vvej] maintained. We quote: Pure man- 
ila, 141-2c; British pure manila, 12c; 
sisal, lll-2c. ; double lathyarn, lie; 
single lathyarn, 10 l-2c. ; Russian tarred 
sonny arn 13 l-2c. ; jute rope, 3-8-in. in 
diam. and upwards, 9c; cotton rope, 
21c; cotton twine, 20 and 23c. for 
3 and 4 "lv. Cotton bedcord, 90c to 
$1.70, according to length. Sash cord 
29c 

Building Paper— Trade is very quiet 
at present. We again quote: Tarred 
felt. $1.85 per' 100 lb.: 2-ply 
ready roofing, 90c per roll; 3-ply, 
$1.15 per roll': carpet felt. $2.25 per 100 
ib. : dry sheathing, 40c per roll; tar 
sheathing, 50c ner roll: dry fibre, 55c 
per roll: tarred fibre, 65c per roll: O.K. 
and I.X.L.. 70c per roll; heavy straw 
and sheathing, $35 per ton: slaters' felt. 
65c. ner roll. 

Cement— Trade is absolutely dead 
this week and no immediate improve- 
ment is expected. We quote the 
following prices: Canadian cement. 
$1.90 to $2.25: German, $2.25 to $2.40: 
English, $2.15 to $2.25; Belgian. $1.70 to 
$1.95 per bbl.. ex store, and American. 
$2.20 to $2.40 ex-cars. 

Firebricks — Trade continues very dis- 
appointing. Prices are unchanged, Eng- 
lish being nuoted at $16 to $22 per 
1.000. and Scotch at $17 to $22. 

Plumbing Goods. 

The feature of the supply trade dur- 
ing the last three weeks has been the 
brisk demand for iron pipe. Unless 
another cold snap develops trade is like- 
ly to be quiet for a \\'\v weeks. 

Lead Pipe— A good average trade is 
reported this week at firm and unchang- 
ed prices. Composition and waste are 
selling at 8c, and ordinary at 7c The 
discount is 35 per cent- 
Iron Pipe — As noted above, iron pipe 
has been in particularly good demand 
(luring the last three weeks. Prices are 
unchanged and we again quote as fol- 

31 



lows subject to discounts of as much as 
10 pel- cent, ill some instances for good 
business: Standard pipe, per 100 
feet, in lengths under L9 feet — black, 
1-8-in., $2.30; 1-4-in., $2.30; 3-8-in., 
$2.55; 1-2-in., $2.85; 3-4-in., $3.65; 1-in., 
$5.20; 1 1-4-in., $7.35; 1 1-2-in., $8.95; 
2-in., $12.55. Galvanized-l-4-in., $3.20; 
3-8-in., $3.45; 1-2-in., $3.90; 3-4-in., $5; 
1-in., $7.20; 11-4-in., $10.05; 1 1-2-in., 
$12.20; .2-in., $16.85. Extra heavy pipe, 
plain ends, are quoted per 100 feet as 
follows: Black, 1-2-in., $4.20: 3-4-in., 
$5.25; 1-in., $7.55; 11-4-in., $10.55; 

1 1-2-in.. $12.75; 2-in., $17.60. Galvan- 
ized -1-2 in., $5.20; 3-4-in., $6.65; 1-in., ' 
$9.55; 11-4-in.. $13.25; 1 1-2-in., $16; 
2-in.. $21. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— In steadj 
request at the following unchanged dis- 
counts . from the list prices: Light 
soil pipe, ."> to 6-in., 50 and 10 
per cent.; medium and extra heavy 
soil pipe. 2 and 6-in., 60 per cent.; ex- 
tra heavy soil pipe, 8-in.. 45 per cent. 
Light fittings, 2 to 6-in., 50 and 10 per 
cent.; medium and extra heavy fittings, 

2 to 6-in., 60 and 5 per cent.; extra 
heavy fittings 8-in., 45 per cent. 

Solder— In sympathy with the strong 
tin market solder is very firmly held at 
prices noted in last issue. We quote: 
Wire solder, 18c; bar. 17 l-2c. 

METALS. 

Apart from some special sales of 
Canada Plates, business this week has 
continued on the quiet side. Buyers 
have not become anxious to load up with 
new stock with the change of calendars. 
There are a number of inquiries for gal- 
vanized iron and some large sales are 
expected soon. Buyers are continuing 
to make offers which are not agreeable 
to sellers. Tin is still very firmly held, 
but no advance has been made over last 
week's quotations. 

Pig Iron — The market continues very 
quiet and in the absence of much actu- 
al business it is hard to quote with ex- 
actitude. We quote as follows: Suni- 
merlee, $19.25 to $19.75; Can-on. No. 1. 
$21; do.. No. 3. $18.50 to $19; Middles- 
boro', No. 3, $17 to $17.50; Aversome. 
No. 1. $20: do.. No. 3. $19.40. 

Bar Iron — Merchants' bar is selling 

a. $1.S5; horseshoe iron $2.10; forged 
iron $2.05. 

Black Sheets— Actual business this 
week has been very light, but prospects 
seem good for an active trade later on. 
We again quote as follows: 28 gauge, 
$4.25; 26 gauge, $2.40; 22 to 24 gauge, 
$2.35; 18 fo 20 gauge, $2.30, and 8 to 
10 gauge, $2.40. 

Galvanized Iron — Numerous inquiries 
sire reported this week and although ac- 
tual business is slack at present good 
sales are expected to be made very soon. 
"v\ e again quote as follows: Gtorbal's 
"Best Best," $4.30; 28 Queen's 
Head, $4.30; Apollo, 10 3-4 oz', 
$4.30; Fleur-de-Lis, $4; Comet. $4; Bell 
brand. $4. Tn less than case lots 25c. 
extra. 

Tinplates In sympathy with the in- 
creasing strength of tin, tinplates are 



Hard-ware and 
Metal 



THE MARKETS 



very firmly held. A few small sales were 
made this week. We quote generally: 
Cokes, $3.75; and charcoals, $4. 

Ingot Tin— The market continues very 
firm, but no advance has been made on 
last week's quotations. We quote 32 to 
33c. 

Terne Plates— Terne plates are a 
1 rifle cheaper for import, but no change 
lias been made on quotations from stock. 
Prices range from $6.75 to $7. 

Coil Chains— We again quote No. 6, 
lOe.; No. 5, 9c; No. 4, 81-2c; No. 
3, 7c; 1-4-in., $6.10; 5-16-inch, $4.70; 
3-8-in., $4; 7-16-in., $3.80; 1-2-in., $3.70; 
9-16-in., $3.55; 5-8-in., $3.35; 3-4-in., 
$3.30; 7-8-in., $3.25; and 1-in., $3.20, 
with 10c allowance on carlots. 

Canada Plates— A number of large 
sales have been made during the week. 
We quote: 52s., $2.30; 60s., $2.40; 75s., 
$2.55; full polished, $3.60, and galvan- 
ized, $4 to $4.10; galvanized 60s., $4.25 
to $4.35. 

Steel— Business is only fair. We quote : 
Sleighshoe, $1.95 to $2; tire, $2 to $2.10; 
spring, $2.75 to $3; reeled machinery, 
$2.75 to $3: toe calk, $2.60; machinery 
(iron finish) $2.50; square harrow, 
$2.50. 

Tool Steel— A satisfactory volume of 
business is passing at the following un- 
changed prices: Black Diamond, 8 to 
9c; Sanderson's, 8 to 9c, according 
to the grade; Jessop's, 13c; Jonas & 
Colver's, 10 to 20c; " Air Hardening," 
50 to 65c per lb.; Conqueror, 7 l-4c 

Ingot Copper— The market continues 
very firm, but last week's quotations 
still obtain. We quote: $13.50 to $13.75 
per 100 lbs. 

Pig Lead- Quoted at $3.20 to $3.30. 

Sheet Zinc— Business is fairly active at 
steady prices. We quote $6.15 to $6.25 
for cask lots; smaller quantities, $6.50. 

Zinc Spelter— The price is 6c 

Scrap Metals— Business 'is still in a 
state of stagnation. There are no 
changes and we again quote as fol- 
lows : Heavy copper and wire, 9 1-2 
to 10c per lb.; light copper 10c; heavy 
red brass, 10c ; heavv yellow, 8 l-2c : 
light brass,-51-2c; lead, 21-4 to 21-2c; 
zinc, 2 3-4 to 3c ; iron, No. 1 wrought, 
$11 to $12; machinery scrap, $13 to $15; 
stove plate, $12; mailable and steel, $6; 
mixed countrv rags, 60 to 70c per 100 
lb.; old rubbers 6 to 6 l-2c per lb. 

Ashes. 

The demand is good and prices have 
been slightly advanced. Supplies are 
light. There are no pearls on the mar- 
ket and prices for same are purely 
nominal. The export demand is said 
to be good. We quote: 

First pots, per owt 8 00 b 10 

Seconds '■> '" % '<> 

Pearls, per 1001b 7 00 7 25 

Hides. 

There is no change in the situation 
since our last report. Receipts from the 
countrj are lighter than before the 
holiday season and the market is gener- 
ally reported quiet, We quote; 



"B li 



No. 1 beef hides 08 08J 

No. 2 " 07 07i 

No. 3 " 06 06i 

Lambskins 75 

No. 1 calfskins 10 

No. 2 " 08 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, January 16, 1904. 

Hardware. 

I'SINESS is particularly good," 
stated a leading wholesale dealer 
this week. " The chief feature 
of this situation is the fact that indica- 
ti( ns point toward stift'er prices. This 
talk of the competition of American 
goods is hard to understand as there is 
really not more of this competition than 
has been the case for some time." Gen- 
eially speaking the above represents the 
opinion of the trade. In some lines 
competition has been especially keen but 
<m the whole the prospects are favorable. 
Orders for future delivery are coming in 
nicely, those from the West being of 
large volume. The skate trade is prac- 
tically done, but there is still an excel- 
lent movement of snow shovels, occa- 
si( ned to a large degree by the heavy 
snow fall. Cordage prices seem to have 
gone crazy, another advance of 2c. in 
sash cord being noted this week. Prices 
on axes are now " open " and lower 
prices are predicted. The only change 
other than this is in Scotch firebricks, 
which have been reduced 2c, making the 
price the same as English. 

Screen Wire Cloth— Orders are com- 
ing in fairly well at the new prices, $1.50 
per 100 square feet. 

Spring Hinges— A fair business is do- 
ing at the new prices, which are steady 
as follows: No. 5, $17.25 per gross; No. 
10, $18 per gross; No. 20, $10.50; No. 
120, $20; No. 51, $9.25; No. 50, $27.50. 

Galvanized Wire— Orders are coming in 
as well as usual for delivery up to May 
1 Practically nothing is doing for 
immediate requirements. Prices are 
now steady as follows: No. 5, 
$3.65; Nos. 6, 7 and 8, $3.10; No. 

9, $2.45; No. 10, $3.15; No. 11. $3.20; 
No. 12, $2.60; No. 13, $2.70; No. 14, 
$3.70. In carlots f.o.b. Cleveland, No. 
5, $2.15; Nos. 6, 7, 8, and 9, $2.10; No. 

10. $2.15; No. 11, $2.20; No. 12, $2.25: 
No. 13, $2.35; No. 14, $2.45. In less 
than carlots, 121-2c per 100 lbs. extra 
charged. 

Barb Wire— A fair business for later 
shipments is reported with prices steady 
since last week's decline of 5c We. 
now quote as follows : $2.75 per 100 
lbs. f.o.b. Toronto, and $2.50 f.o.b. Cleve- 
land. Carlots of 15 tons, $2.40 f.o.b. 
Cleveland. 

Coiled Spring Wire— The proportion of 
this wire selling is large again this year. 
Prices are now as follows: No. 9, $2.7(1 
per 100 lbs. f.o.b. Cleveland, freights 
equalized with factory points at Hamil- 
ton, London, Welland or Windsor and 
allowance to other points up to 25c; 
carlots, $2.65, freight allowance to 20c 

Wire and Cut Nails— There is a small 
movement from stock. Orders for Later 

delivery are large. Quotations being 
38 



made for delivery up to May 1, but not 
for delivery later than that date. The 
base prices for ordinary lots are $2.45 
ptv keg f.o.b. Toronto. " 

Screws— No change is reported in this 
line. A fair business has been done. We 
quote: Flat head bright, 871-2 per cent, 
discount; round head bright 821-2 per 
cent.; flat head brass, 80 per cent.; round 
head brass, 75 per cent.; round head 
bronze, 70 per cent.: flat head bronze, 
75 per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs— Business is improv- 
ing- at steady prices. Our quota- 
tions ai'e : Iron rivets, 60 and 10 
per cent, discount; iron burrs, 55 per 
cent.; copper rivets, with usual propor- 
tion of burrs, 45 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts— The Canadian manu- 
facturers seem to have a clear field, as 
United States competition is now prac- 
tically nil. We quote as follows: Car- 
riage bolts, common ($1 list), 3-16 and 
1-4-in., 60 per cent.; 5-16 and 3-8-in.. 
55 and 5 per cent. ; 7-16 and up, 55 per 
cent. : carriage bolts, full square ($2.40 
list), 60 per cent.; carriage bolts, Nor- 
way iron ($3 list), 60 per cent.; ma- 
chine bolts, 3-8 and less, 60 per cent.: 
7-16 and up, 55 and 5 per cent.; coach 
screws, cone points, 66 2-3 and 10 per 
cent. 

Cordage — Cotton prices continue to 
boom upwards and Canadian manufac- 
turers of cotton cordage are keeping 
prices away up. Sash cord is 2c higher 
this week. We quote as follows: Pure 
m anil a", 141-2c : British pure manila. 
12c: sisal, lll-2c: double lathyarn. 
11 l-2c: single lathyarn, lie; double 
shingleyarn, lll-?c; single shinslevarn. 
11c; sashcord "Hercules," 30 to 32c: 
"Star." 38 to 40c; cotton rope. 3-16- 
in. and un, 20 1-2 to 22c : 5-32-in., 25 to 
27c: 1-8-in.. 25 to 28c: cotton twine. 
3-ply, 22 to 24c: 4-ply. 26 to 28c 

Skates — The season is about over and 
stocks are pretty well cleared out. 

Harness — A particulai'ly sood demand 
for sleighbells and horse robes is report- 
ed, at steady prices. 

Snow Shovels— An excellent demand 
has been caused by the heavy snowfall, 
particularly in the stronger, heavier 
shovels. 

Woodenware— But a slight demand. 
Prices are unchanged as follows: 
We quote per dozen : Washboards, Victor 
$1.35: Crown, $1.45; Improved Globe. 
$1.60: Standard Globe, $1.70; Original 
solid Globe, $2; Superior Solid Back 
Globe, $2.15 ; Jubilee, $2.10 ; Pony, 95c. ; 
Dominion King (qflass), $3.10. Tubs, 
No. 0. $10.50; No. 1, $8.50; No. 2. $7.50; 
No.' 3, $6.50. Pails, No. 1, 2 hoops, 
$1.75 and $1.90. 

Building Paper— The market in build- 
ing paper continues quiet this week. Our 
quotations are: Tarred felt. $1.85 
per 100 lb.: 2-ply ready roofing, 
90c per roll; 3-plv, $1.15 per roll; car- 
pet felt, $2.25 per 100 lb.; dry sheath- 
ing, 40c per roll ; tar sheathing, 50c. per 
roll; dry fibre, 55c per roll; tarred fibre, 
65c. per roll; O.K. and I.X.L.. 70c. por 



PORTLAND CEMENT 

CANADIAN, ENGLISH, 

GERMAN and BELGIAN. 

FIRE BRICKS, FIRE CLAY, 

ENAMELLED BRICKS, all colors. 
BUILDING BRICKS. 

SEWER PIPES, CULVERT PIPES, 
WHEELBARROWS, 

FOUNDERS' and CON- 
TRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 
. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWEfOTE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a SpeciaPy. 

fHE CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO 

HAMILTON. ONT. TORONTO. ONT. 

ST. JOHNS. QUC 



Deseronto Iron Co 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers ot 



Charcoal Pig Iroe 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleab i 
Castings, Boiler lubes, Engine Cylinders, II > 
draulic and other Machinery wh--re gnat sirerge 
is r quired : Strong, High Silicon Iron, f _,r Fouudr. 
Purposes. 



ii 



55 



MIDLAND 

BRAND 

Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Pries to Sales Agents 

Drummond McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE. 
or to 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT, Llmltod 



THE MARKETS 



roll; heavy straw and sheathing, $35 per 
ton; slaters' felt, GOc. per roll. 

Cement — Cement is quiet with last 
week's prices unchanged. We quote: 
Canadian Portland at $2.05 to $2.65 To- 
ronto, and $1.05 to $1.90 at the works; 
American Portland, $2 Toronto. 

Firebricks— There is an active trade. 
Prices of Scotch are 2c. lower than a 
week ago. This brings the Quotations 
on both English and Scotch to 28 to 33c. 

PLUMBING GOODS. 

e 

Business is quiet as usual at this sea- 
son. Last week's prices continue un- 
changed. Our quotations are: 

Lead Pipe — The market in lead pipe 
is dull. We quote the following prices : 
Lead, 7c; lead waste pipe, 8c; discount 
35 per cent. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— Trade is 
steady but quiet. Our quotations are as 
fellows: Light soil pipe, 45 and 5 per 
cent.; light soil pipe fittings, 50 and 
5 per cent; medium and__extra heavy 
pipe and fittings, 55 and 5 per cent. ; 7 
and 8-in. pipe, 40 and 5 per cent. 

Iron Pipe Fittings— Business is fair 
We quote the following discounts: Mal- 
leable fittings, 15 per cent.; cast iron 
(not standard), 571-2 per cent.; head- 
ers, 52 1-2 per eent. ; flanged unions, 
521-2 per cent.; bushings and plugs, 
57 1-2 per cent. ; unions 55 per eent. ; 
nipples, 2-in., 65 per cent.; nipples 21-2 
to 6-in., inclusive, 60 per cent. 

Copper Range Boilers— Trade is fair. 
Lost week's discounts at 15 per cent, 
continue. 

Brass Goods — Business in steamfitters' 
brass goods is fair with prices steady. 

Iron Pipe— There is not much doing 
in iron pipe this wee- We quote f.o.b. 
Toronto as follows: 1-8-in., $3.25; 1-4- 
in., $2.30; 3-8-in., $2.55; 1-2-in., $2.85; 
3-4-in., $3.65; 1-in., $5.20; 1 1-4-in., 
$7.35; 1 1-2-in., $8.95; 2-in., $12.55; 
2 1-2-in., $19.25; 3-in., $22.75; 3 1-2-in., 
$28.75; 4-in., $35.25. 

METALS. 

The completion of stock taking by 
many manufacturers throughout the 
country has proved to be one of the most 
pc tent factors in creating a stronger 
tone in the Ontario metal market. A 
good year's profits have been disclosed 
by practically every balancing-up. So, 
as the indications warrant the belief that 
the volume of business in Canada will 
this year be fully up to the large volume 
of last year a more hopeful view of 
tilings is taken than was the case last 
year. Prices show no appreciable 
change but there is manifestly a stronger 
tone regarding most metals and parti- 
cularly iron and steel, than has been the 
case for some time. The curtailment of 
production of pig iron in the United 
States has undoubtedly helped towards 
a stronger position in iron and iron pro- 
ducts and the fact that many furnaces 
mo again being started is an indication 
ot' the trend of opinion "as to the future 
of the market. 

Pig Iron— The Canadian market is 
steadier tha'n it has been for some time 

33 



Hardware and 
Metal 



"DOMINION CROWN" 

A guarantee of quality on 

Bar and Hoop Iron, 

Best Horseshoe Iron, 

B.B. Charcoal Tinplates, 

Polished Steel Sheets, 

Polished Canadas, etc. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

509-512 Merchants Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 



Many a Dollar 

can be brought into your 
Cash Box if you handle 

McDougall Pumps 

They are strong and 
will stand good hard 
service. 

The sale of a McDoug- 
all Pump will lead to a 
lot more business. 
SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 




McDougall Pumps 
— Made iu Canada 



The R. McDougall Co., Limited Gait, Ont. 



(\ 1 l/Pl/JO The original and only Genuine 

I U K r I X Preparation for Cleaning Cutlery 

UalXLi U 6d. and is Canisters. 

' WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE P OLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England 

Agent: 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 



Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., united 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers of » ■ 

Ferrona Pig lion 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



Hardware and 

Metul 



ami while quotations show uo change 

Htiv is a better feeling owing to the 
Stronger tune on outside markets. Prices 
aie nominally $18.50 tor No. 1 and $18 
for No. 2. 

Bar Iron— Competition is still keen. 
Our quotations are unchanged, but are 
nominal. Some dealers quoted higher 
f.-j-i ordinary business. We quote: $1.80 
f.o.b. Toronto for extras cut to length 
while rolling; 2 ft. and over, 10c. per 
100 lb. ; 1 ft. and under 2 ft., 15c. ; under 
1 ft. 20c, over 20 ft. by special agree- 
ment according to length and size. 

Black Sheets— Prices are unchanged, 
a fair business doing. We quote: 10 to 
16 gauge, $2.50; 18 to 20 gauge, $2.70; 
22 to 24 gauge, $2.90; 30 gauge, $3. 

Canada Plates— There is rather better 
movement, with prices steady. We quote: 
All dull, $2.50: half-polished, $2.00: and 
all-bright, $3.50. 

Tin— A fairly good business has been 
prompted by the stiff market, An ad- 
vance of $1 l«'r 100 lbs. is noted on the 
local market, which change is a result 
nf higher values on the larger markets. 
We now quote prices at $30. oil to $31.50. 
Galvanized Sheets— A fair trade is 
doing at steady prices. We quote: 
'Queen's Head, $4.25 to $4.50 for 28 
gauge; American, $4.40 for 24 gauge; 
Bell brand, $4.25 for 28 gauge ; Gordon 
Grown, $4.25 for 28 gauge. 

Tinplates— A better feeling prevails, 
despite American competition. We 
quote as follows: Coke plates, bright, 
14x20. $3.75; charcoal plates, $4.25. 

Copper— There is a fair movement. 
Prices steady as follows: Ingot copper, 
$14, and sheet copper, $20 per 100 lbs. 

Brass— There is a fair trade, with the 
discount steady at 15 per cent. 

Lead— A considerable advance is re- 
ported at outside market, but local quo- 
tations are steady. We quote : $3.30 per 
100 lb. for pig lead and $3.65 for bar 
lead. 

Zinc Spelter— -Prices show an upward 
tendency at primary market, but the 
local situation is unchanged at 6 to 
61 -2c. per lb. 

Zinc Sheets— The market is firm and 
a fair business doing. We quote: Cask 
lots, $6.75 to $7, and part casks, $7 to 
$7.25. 

Solder— Cood trade doing. Prices 
are still stiffening. We quote: Guaran- 
teed half-and-half at 18c, and wiping. 

17c 

Old Material— Trade is opening up 
fairly well and prices are firm. We 
quote: Heavy copper and wire, 10c. per 
lb.: li"ht copper. He. per lb.: heavy red 
brass, 9 3-4c. per lb.; heavy yellow brass, 
Rc per lb.: lighl brass, 5c per lb.; lead. 
•2 1-4c per lb.: scrap zinc. 3c. per lb.: 
j nn , No. 1 wrouebt, $10.50; No. 2 
wrought, $4: machinery cast crap, $13 
to $14: stoveplate, $10: malleable and 
sieel, $4: -old rubbers. 6 l-8e. per lb.: 
pountry mixed rags, 50c. per 100 lb. 
Hides, Skins and Wool. 

The market con! inu.-s quiet this Week, 
with last, week's priors unchanged. Our 



THE MARKETS 



RETURNED 



e^jt &**>fcr| 




GREAT-WESTERN" 
BRAND 



FILES 



Warranted. 



and 



These goods are used in the largest Saw Mills, Machine Shops and Foundries throughout the V.i 
Canada on account of their SUPERIOR QUALITY. 

For sale in Canada by the following prominent Hardware Merchants 



J. H. Ashdown Hardware Co., Limited, Winnipeg 
Hickman, Ty.- Hardware Co., Limited. Victoria. 
( !hinic Hardware Co., Quebec 



McLennan, McFeely & Co., Limited, Vancouver. 
L. H. Hebert, Montreal. 
Black Bros. & Co.. Halifax. 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers oi 
Set and Cap Screws, Speoial Milled Work, Engine Studs 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 
INGERSOLL, ONT. 



NEW 

Rails 



12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 24, 30, 35 and 56 lbs, to 
the Yard- carried in STOCK for prompt ship- 
ment. TRACK REQUISITES. 



Sesscnwein Bros., 



103 Shannon St. 

. . MONTREAL. 



"We invito 

inquiries 

for 



STEEL RAILS, 



BAR IRON, PIG IRON GALVAN- 
IZED IRON, CANADA PLATES, 
TINPLATES, WIRE ROPE (W. B. 
BROWN & CO,), CEMENT, FIREBRICKS, ORE BAGS, GRAIN BAGS, ETC. 



C. F. JACKSON & CO., Limited, IMPORTERS and COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

151 Hastings St. W., VANCOUVER, B.C , and LIVERPOOL. ENGLAND. 



HIDES. 

No. 1 green, per lb 071 

" 2 " " 06i 

" 1 " steers, per lb 08 

" 2 07 

Cured, per lb 08} 

CALFSKINS. . 

Veal skins, No. 1, 6 to « 10. inclusive 09 

" " i 07 

1 15 to 20 lb " 08 

' 3 " " 0G 

Deacons (dairies), each 60 70 

Lamb and sheep skins 90 

WOOL. 

Unwashed wool, per lb 09 10 

Fleece wool, " 16 17-i 

Pulled wools, super, per lb 17 19 

" extra " 20 21 

TaUow, per lb 045 04J 



quotations arc 



PITTSBURG METAL MARKET. 

From the lion Trade Review, Pittsburg, Jan. 14, 1904. 

IN finished lines the iron and steel 
trade has improved decidedly in the 
past ten days, and the genera] situa- 
tion is more encouraging' than at any 
time in months. Specifications on old 

i tracts, and new orders placed last 

week with the largest steel producers 
v. ere heavier than during any similar 
period since last July, and this week thus 
lar is showing a decided. improvement 
34 



over last. The largest tonnages hooked 
are in iron and steel bars, while plates 
and structural material are not far be- 
hind. Wire nails and wire products are 
also in excellent demand, and an im- 
provement in heavier lines is expected 
to follow the better condition in the 
lighter classes of material. 

Manufacturers of steel bars are es- 
pecially well pleased over the present 
situation. At a meeting of the associa- 
tion held at the Union Club in this city 
yesterday a number of manufacturers 
were in favor of making an advance of 
ifi per ton. but this was overruled by a 
slight majority. The bar iron situation 
has also stiffened up considerably. The 
largest producers will only quote 1.30c. 
Voungstown, on business for early de- 
livery, and are not anxious to close for 
im y extended delivery at this price, (in 
Monday the American Steel and Wire 
Co., tire Pittsburg Steel Co.; and the wire 
imd wire nail interests of [ronton, ().. 
and Ashland. Ky., issued a new uniform 
piice list, which carries an advance of 



THE MARKETS 



Hardtraro and 
Metal 



if'J a ton on wire nails and all wire pro- 
ducts. Per the past three or four months 
this market lias been demoralized with 
the result that quotations dropped from 
$1 to $5 a ton Prom the last official prices 
announced by the American Steel and 
AN ire Co. The new list bases all quota- 
tions f.o.b. Pittsburg. This is the first 
agreement on wire nails and wire pro- 
ducts that has been entered into for 
some time, and while numerous small 
concerns are not included in the agree- 
ment, all of the large factors in the trade 
in competition with the American Steel 
and Wire Co. have agreed to maintain 
prices. On the other hand the cut nail 
manufacturers at a meeting held here 
last Thursday reduced both iron and 
steel cut nails 10 cents a keg. Foundry 
coke, strictly Connellsville, is quoted at 
$1.90 to $'2, although producers of grades 
very low in sulphur are receiving as high 
as $2.15 and $2.25. 



NATURE AND THE AMERICAN 
IRONMONGER. 
~\ ~\ J E must recognize the lavish hand 
VV with which Nature • prepared 
the way for our industrial tri- 
umphs, by accumulating along the south- 
ern and western shores of Lake Superior 
those vast beds of iron ore, which are 
no' only the most extensive in the world, 
bill are so placed that the labor of ex- 
cavating and loading for shipment is 
practically nothing, says Scientific Am- 
erican. The ore. which is extremely rich, 
60 per cent, of it being iron, lies prac- 
tically at the surface of the ground; 
and it is so loose and friable that all 
that is necessary for its recovery is to 
run in a train of cars, set a steam shovel 
at work, and load the material directly 
onto the cars. This work has actually 
been done at the rate of 5,800 tons in 
ten hours, and this with the labor of 
but eight men at a cost of five cents only 
pej ton for labor. The supply is enorm- 
ous, a single corporation having recent- 
ly estimated its holdings at 500,000,000 
tons, valued at as many million dollars. 
These vast and easily-recovered sup] dies. 
however, would have a limited value, 
were there not available a proportion- 
al, supply of coking coal: and this has 
been provided with an equally lavish 
hand in the famous Connellsville dis- 
trict, where a single coke company on 
entering into one of the great Lndus- 
ttial combinations of the past tew years, 
stated that it owned 40,000 acres of coal 
lands in this region, and 11,000 coke 
c-Tens. Within easy reach of the coal 
district there are also large quarries of 
limestone, the third of the three consti- 
tuents in the charge of a blast furnace. 



For Yourself 



You choose reliability and endurance when it comes to building — 






i 



CKoose the Same for 
Your Customers 

Then you are certain of harmonious conditions and 

ever-increasing sales and prestige. 
We make every conceivable need in 

SKeet Metal Building Materials 

Honest, capable goods that give the acme of artistic 
effect, as well as enduring reliability. With our 
lines in stock, you'll never have an apology to 
make to your customers. 

Consider — these things "count for much. 

The Metallic Roofing Co., Limited 

TORONTO , MONTREAL WINNIPEG 



BUSINESS CONDITIONS IN MANITOBA. 

By Regular Correspondent, of " Hardware and Metal.'* 

Office of ''Hardware and Metal.' lists prevailing to the jobbing trade. 

Room 308 Bfclntyre Block, Paid precisely the same freight as from 

Winnipeg, Jan. 11. 1904. Vancouver, paid si per M duty, and yet 

" been able to lay the lumber down in 

BUSINESS is quiet in all lines of hard Winnipeg for $3 less than the same class 

ware, and wholesale houses are busv of lumber from British Columbia. The 

taking stock and getting matters in controversy is ping merrily on and the 

f . people of the West are watching the out 

trim for the Spring rush. Until stock- eome with murll mterestj as tM0 ,. ost of 

taking is completed there will be very few lumber and the possibility of getting a 

changes in the price lists for staple lines sufficient supply is a matter of the most 

.. \ , vital importance to the incoming' settlers, 

ot hardware. , .,/ , , , . , . f. 

. ana wilt help or hinder immigration more 

So far as Spring requirements can be than any ()tl)f>1 . ()ne factor 

forecast at the present time the outlook * * * 

is for a very heavy trade in all classes The Union Bank. Winnipeg's first sky 

Of building hardware, structural iron and scraper, now in course of erection here. 

, .. , ,• „ ...ii,. is to be of brick from Lac du Ronnel 

builders supplies generally. T , • . ,, , , .... , 

11 , I his is the second large building to be 

(neat interest, has been excited through ,. lvf . t( . fl o{ this p arti( . n f ar na tive pressed 

out the province by the publication in brick, which is very handsome in appear 

The Free Tress on Thursday, January 7. ance. and of a peculiar tone of pinky 

of a lengthy interview with Mr. Wm. buff. 

Whvte, '2nd vice-president and general John MeKechnie, head <>f The Vulcan 

western manager of the C.P.R., to the I ron Works Co.. was the recipient of a 

effect that if the combine, which is now solid silver fruit service and smoker's 

known to exist between the manufactu- companion during the Holiday season 

rers of lumber and the retail dealers' from the men of the works. Mr. E. K. 

association, did not amend their ways Barrett, of the same company, was also 

and charge lower prices for this prime presented with a solid silver writing and 

requisite of the new settler, the C.P.R. cigar set. 

would open large mills in British Colum • . • 

bia and would sell lumber at lower Prices are fairlv steady, except in bolts 

figures through their various agencies. atu ] m it s in which some changes in di^ 

This statement raised a storm among the counts are noted. The list is now as 

various dealers in the retail association. follows : 

and there have been strong statements on ^^ ^ ^ ]fa 

both sides of the case, the retail dealers p ]ain ga , vanize d 6 to 8 339 

laving the whole blame of high prices .. q 2 so 

and insufficient stocks on lack of trans- Plain galvanized 10 350 

portation on the C.P.R. There have 12 3 10 

been transportation difficulties without u j3 

doubt, but dealers outside the combine „ '.'.'.'.'.'. ".".'.'.".'.'.*.'.. ....15 4 45 

give some rather startling figures. For .. '.".'.'.'.'..'.'.'.'!."..".'.".'". 16 460 

example, they state that during the past Barbed wire, 100 lb 3 25 

Summer they have gone into Washington Plain twist 3 2 S 

territory. hougVri lumber at the ordinary Staples 365 

35 



H«rdw»r» and 
Metal 



THE MARKETS 



Oiled annealed wire 10 



3 42 



« 3 48 

" 12 3 56 

" 13 3 66 

14 3 76 

IS 3 91 

Annealed wires (unoiled) 10c. less. 
Horsenails, 40 per cent. discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 $4 75 

No. 2 and larger 4 45 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 60 

No. 2 and larger 445 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 4 45 

No. 2 and larger 4 20 



Cut Nails- 
ad 1 in $\ 10 

3d Fin. 154 in. . \ 10 

3d 1 K in 3 75 

4d i54 in 3 50 

5d iK in 3 50 

6d 2 in 3 40 

8d 254 in 3 25 

iod 3 in 3 20 

2od 4 in.. 3 15 

30d 454 in 3 10 

4°d 5 in 3 10 

5od $% in 3 10 

6od 6 in 3 10 



Wire Nails — 
1 in 4 25 

1 V% in 4 20 

iH " ••• 
iK " ... 

iV* " ... 

2 " ... 
254 " ... 

3 ' ••• 
354 " ... 

4 ' ... 
454 " ... 

5 ' ••• 
S'A " ... 

6 " ... 



a 


80 


a 


60 


3 


60 


3 5° 


3 35 


3 


30 


3 


25 


3 


20 


3 


20 


3 


20 


3 


20 


3 


20 


2 


60 


4 


75 


2 


85 


3 


25 


3 


50 


8 


5° 


'3 


00 


3 5° 


3 75 


3 


90 


4 


00 


4 


10 


4 


00 


4 


00 


4 25 


4 


25 


4 5° 


4 


TS 



Bar iron (basis) 

Swedish iron (basis) 

Sleigh shoe steel . 

Spring steel 

Machinery steel 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 

Jessop 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 16 gauge, 100 lb. 

18 to 22 gauge 

24 gauge 

26 gauge 

28 gauge 

Galvanized Iron, Apollo, 16 gauge 

18 and 20 gauge 

22 and 24 gauge 

26 gauge 

28 gauge 

30 gauge or 10K oz 

Extra sheets, 36 in. wide an advance 
of 2s p.c. per 100 lb. 

Queen's Head, 24 gauge 4 25 

26 gauge 4 50 

28 " 4 75 

Extra sheets, 36-in. wide, an advance 
of 25 p.c. per 100 lb. 

Genuine Russian, per lb 11 

Imitation " " 07 to 08 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 8 00 

26gauge 8 S° 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20x28, box .... 10 00 

" IX 12 00 

IXX 1400 

Ingot tin 35' 

Canadaplate, 18 x 21, i8x 24 and 20 x 28. 3 25 

Canada plate, full polished 4 00 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 50 

Broken lots 8 00 



Pig lead, 100 lb 

Black iron pipe, 54 inch 
Vi. " 
X " 
54 " 

Black iron pipe, M inch . 

i'A " 
1 54 " 



S50 

3 3° 

3 3° 

3 40 

3 70 

4 35 

6 25 

8 70 

. . . •■ 10 50 

14 5° 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger, basis 11 75 

Manila, 7-16 and larger, basis 15 25 

Lath yarn 11 25 

Solde- 20 

Axes, chopping $ 6 75 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Bluestone 5 70 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 85 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 80 p.c. 

Flat " brass 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 70 and iop.c. 

Coach 70 p.c. 

Bolts, carriage, 3-16 and M 60 p.c. 

5-i6 to X ....55 and 5 p.c. 

7-16 and larger 55 p.c. 

Machine bolts, y» and smaller 60 p.c. 

1/1 and larger 55 and 5 p.c. 

Tire bolts , 60 and 5 p.c. 



Bolts, Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 50 p.c. 

Flat head stove 60 and 5 p.c. 

Round head 60 and 5 p.c. 

Elevator 60 p.c. 

Square nuts 254c. off list. 

Rivets, iron 50 and 10 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 

" No. 12 

Coil chain, 3-16 inch 

yi inch 

5-16 inch 

J4 inch 

7-16 inch 

54 to % inch 



32 

36 

io54 

8* 

5* 

53* 

5 

AX 

Spades and shovels ... .40 and 5 p.c. 

Harvest tools 60 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz. . $3 15 

No. 1 1 90 

No. 2 1 60 

Octagon extra 2 30 

No. 1 1 60 

Files common 70 and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 p.c. ' 

Building paper : 

Anchor, plain 65c. 

tarred 70c. 

Pure fibre, plain 65c. 

taned 80c. 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

" . military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5 p.c 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge black 15 00 

chilled, 12 gauge 1650 

soft, 10 gauge 19 50 

chilled, 10 gauge 21 50 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 20 

Chilled : 6 60 

Powder, F.F., keg 475 

F.F.G 5 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 70 and 10 p.c. 

" " plain 75 and 254 p.c. 

' ' pieced 

Japanned ware 3754 p.c. 

Enamelled ware, white 45 p.c. 

Famous 50 and 10 p.c. 

Imperial 50 and 10 p.c. 

Green Wire Cloth ..150 

PETROLEUM. 

Water white American 2754c. 

Prime white American 2554c. 

Water white Canadian 2554c. 

Prime white Canadian 2454c. 

SCRAP. 

No. 1 cast iron $14 to 15 

No. 2 " 7 

Wrought iron scrap 5 

Copper (heavy) 854c. per lb. 

Yellow brass (heavy) 754c. " 

Light brass 5c. to 6c. " 

Lead pipe, or tea lead 2c. to 254 c " 

Zinc scrap ic. " 

PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 

Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ o 90 

Less than barrel lots o 95 

Linseed oil, raw o 57 

Boiled 060 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor o 2854 

Eldorado engine o 2754 

Atlantic red o 3354 

Renown engine o 42 

Black oil 1954 to 21 54 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 to 74 

Harness oil o 56 

Neatsfoot oil 1 00 

Steam refined oil o 85 

Sperm oil 2 00 

Pure castor oil, first pressure o 10 

Lubricating oil 010 

WINDOW GLASS. 
Single break, up to 25 inches, $3.75 ; 26 to 40, 

$4; 41 to 50, $4.50; 51 to 60, $5; 61 to 70, fc.50, in 

100-ft. boxes. 



SUCCESSOR TO MR. KORB. 

Mr. J. N. Hunter assumes eharge this 
week of the advertising department of 
Lewis Bros. & Co., Montreal, following 
Mi. Theodore Korb, whose departure 
for Louisville was noted in our last issue. 
Mr Korb is a bard man to follow, but 
Mr. Hunter is young, energetic and en- 
thusiastic, and his friends have no doubt 
that he will achieve success in his new 
position. 



B. Beaulieu, general merchant, Ste. 
Selene, has made an assignment. V. E. 
i'aradis, provisional guardian. 

36 



INTERNATIONAL STOCK FOOD CO. 

THE International Stock Food Co. 
who started in operation their 
Canadian manufacturing plant at 
Toronto a few months ago, have already 
won a wide connection throughout the 
Dominion. This firm are manufacturers 
of stock foods which are widely recog- 
nized for their practical value throughout 
Canada as well as the United States. In 
the Minneapolis headquarters of the con- 
cern is a model farm, one of the most 
famous in the world. In it several re- 
markable horses are kept, including Dan 
Patch, l.o6X> champion harness horse of 
the world. These animals are all fed on 
the company's stock food. The Interna- 
tional Stock Food Co. are large, shrewd 
advertisers, and use the farming' journals, 
etc., to assist their agents in making their 
lines popular. A good feature of their 
advertising is the gratuitous distribution 
of literature to customers of any of their 
agents. Hardware dealers who are not 
in touch with this company should write 
at once to secure the agency for that 
town. 

DUNDAS AXE WORKS. 

THE Dundas Axe Works are known 
to practically all Canadian hard- 
ware merchants. In their cata- 
logue this year they say : " The steel we 
now use enables us to make an axe that 
is hard without losing its toughness. A 
customer living in a region where hem- 
lock is plentiful got a shantyman to try 
our axe on a hemlock knot, and reported 
that ' he could not mark the axe.' The 
shape of our axes for 1904 has been fur- 
ther improved and is now so perfect and 
so uniform that it is only necessary to get 
the weight the customer wants. It is not 
necessary to show a dozen or more to sell 
one. Our axes are known to lumbermen 
to be thoroughly reliable, each box con- 
taining \i good axes. These axes are 
advertised in papers that reach the buyers 
of axes, the men you want to sell to, and 
they are going to ask you for them." It 
would be worth while writing for a copy 
of this catalogue, which contains cuts of 
their various brands. 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and 
Metal 



BUSINESS CONDITIONS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



By Regular Correspondent of " Hardware and Metal." 



IT has been, something of a shock, to 
say the least of it, to learn from 
special despatches received from Win- 
nipeg to-day, that the Canadian Pacific 
are seriously contemplating entering into 
competition in the lumber business with 
the mills now in existence. The authori- 
ty of Vice-President W. Whyte, of the 
C.P.R., is quoted for the assertion, 
which is that the company will erect 
large and up-to-date sawmills and sell 
direct to the settlers through their 
agents unless the lumber "combine" and 
the retail dealers will reduce their prices 
and sell at a reasonable profit. 

This statement, made in Winnipeg, is, 
of course, of vital importance here on the 
coast and in the interior of the province, 
where large mills are now numerous, and, 
many of them, like the coast mills, de- 
pend largely on the trade of Manitoba 
and the Northwest. The claim has been 
made right along by the lumbermen, that 
owing to increased cost of production and 
high freigiit rates the price of lumber 
cannot be lowered. An additional factor 
in the cost has been found in the some- 
what increased timber dues and license 
fees fixed by the new land act af the 
British Columbia Government, passed at 
the session still in progress. 

Prices of all grades of lumber have in- 
creased steadily for the past three years, 
so that even here on the coast, at the 
point of production, there has been at 
least 30 per cent, increase all round. The 
cost of building has almost become pro- 
hibitive in Vancouver, what with high 
price of lumber and very high scale of 
wages in all building trades. 

A grievance the lumbermen have been 
claiming is that the free admission of 
lumber from the United States has mili- 
tated against the trade. They have been 
working hard by every means to make 
such representations to the Dominion 
Government that a duty shall be levied 
on lumber from the United States at 
least equal to that which Canadian lum- 
ber has to pay entering the republic. 
They assert that hundreds of cars of 
lumber sold below cost have been dumped 
on the market of Manitoba and the 
Northwest during the last three months 
of the past year, with the effect that the 
market there was demoralized. They 
claim the United States lumbermen have 
followed this course rather than allow 
their overproduction to demoralize their 
own home market. 

There is no question that the pro- 
nouncement of such a high official as Mr. 
Whyte will cause a sensation in the him 
ber trade, being so irreconcilably at 
variance from the emphatically expressed 
views held by the leading men in the 
trade. It will have a very serious effect 
on the general business interests of the 
coast in particular if any crisis is 
brought on by the stated intention of 
the C.P.K. There is not the least doubt 
that the mills would not hesitate a 
moment to close clown to prove the jus- 
tice of their claims. One leading mill 
manager said not long SEfO that ho was 
very willing at -any moment to permit 
any interested party to send in a force 
of expert accountants to make an exami- 
nation of his books and report as to the 
profits in operation for the past year. 
The business had boon good, and there 



was a large turnover, but (lie margin of 
profit had been small, lie was ready, lie 
said, to make this offer at any time. 

At the time the statement was made, 
which was shortly before Christmas, the 
gentlemen in question was discussing the 
inequiatble conditions under the tariff on 
lumber, which the millmen here suffered 
from, being practically handicapped by a 
duty of ?2 per thousand. Then there was 
no such move on the part of any person 
suggested. It will be interesting now to 
note if the millmen would be ready to 
allow Mr. Whyte to send in experts to go 
over their books and ascertain the 
amount of profit, if any, from operating 
the mills in 1903, which was a very 
favorable season, taken all round. The 
demand for lumber and shingles was 
fairly good, and the supply of cars by 
the C.P.R., especially in the latter part 
of the Summer, was better than former- 

ly- 

• » • 

In connection with the lumber question, 
it is notable that at the present moment 
every mill in Vancouver has a very 
heavy stock of lumber on hand. It has 
been noted adversely during the past few 
weeks that it does not look well to see 
the lumber being piled up at such a rate. 
It is an indication that the demand is 
not so good as it was. Of course there 
is less being shipped to the Northwest in 
Winter than in the open season, and 
building falls off even here, where the 
season is open all the time, because there 
is too much rain to permit of steady 
work. There is a remarkable amount of 
building, even of new houses starting, 
still in hand for the season of the year, 
and there is every indication of greater 

activity than last season before long. 

# * * 

Two freight steamers, one last week, 
the Oanfa, of the China Mutual Line, 
and another this week, the Peleus, 
of The Ocean Steamship Co.. have 
been discharging cargoes at British 
Columbia ports. The quantity of freight 
brought by each succeeding steamer of 
these lines is constantly increasing, and 
indications are that the business of sail- 
ing ships will be largely cut off, for gen- 
eral merchandise cargo at least. The 
whole of the trade in metals, iron, steel, 
both bar and sheet ; and galvanized 
sheets, steel rope, fire bricks, glass, and 
many other lines of staples, has practi- 
cally gone to the steamers, which have 
now been running regularly for the past 
year. 

Both these lines, the China Mutual and 
The Ocean Steamship Co., are owned by 
Alfred Holt, of London, Eng.. and his 
associates. The vessels are all of enor- 
jnous carrying capacity, averaging some- 
thing like 10,000 tons. The number of 
these steamers owned by the Holt syndi- 
cates is nearly 100, so that the connec- 
tion is worldwide, the steamers covering- 
every freight route on all the oceans of 
the globe. This past season the vessels 
have been able to get sonic return busi- 
ness from British Columbia ports by 
carrying out salmon for England, taking 
a large percentage of the 1903 pack. The 
carrying of special orders of lumber has 
also been undertaken, and in other ways 
there is promise of remunerative return 
traffic. Nearby every steamer has 
brought several hundred tons of cargo 

37 



for the merchants of Victoria and Van- 
couver from the marts of England. A 
large quantity of materials for improve 
ments at the Esquimalt navy yards, has 

I n shipped (lining the past year by the 

British Admiralty on these steamers. 

• • • 

VV'hether it foreshadows an intention on 
the part of the C.P.li. to begin manufac 

luri' of coaches here or not, the state- 
ment is made that the company intends 
to make a test of tin- various valuable 
hardwoods from' Australia for purposes 
of interior decoration. They are arrang- 
ing for trial importations and will erect 
a storage warehouse near their shops on 
False Creek in this city for the purpose 
of receiving the timber. Already there 
has been considerable use made locally 
of the Australian woods for cabinet work 
and shop and office fittings. One variety 
in particular, the Australian red bean 
wood, is a very great favorite here. It 
takes a splendid polish on its natural 
color, which is a deep rich red. Other 
varieties have also been tried. The im- 
portation of Australian hard woods has 
been carried on here for a number of 
years, the direct steamship service be- 
tween British Columbia and the Coin 

monwealth making it very convenient. 

• « * ' 

Another C.P.K. announcement of inter- 
est this week, is the intention to begin 
the lighting of their passenger coaches 
with acetylene. The gas will be stored 
under pressure in tanks situated in the 
cars. To produce the gas a plant will 
be erected at the shops and carbide of 
calcium imported from the east. 

• • • 

The customs returns for Vancouver and 
Victoria manifest substantia] progress 
during the past year. Vancouver's total 
imports increased from ?o,615,01 I to 
§6,071,064, and the revenue from all 
sources advanced from £1,264.416 to 
SI ,552,287. The revenue at Victoria 
(from imports only) increased from 
s-719,977 to £767,799. 6The total revenue 
at Victoria this year was Sl.354,772. 

Vancouver, B.C., Jan. 9. 1901. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. J. Ernest Milieu, of John Millen & 
Sons, Montreal, was in Toronto this 
week on business. 

W. C. Webster & Son, Coaticook, Que., 
write : "We consider our money has been 
well invested in subscribing to "Hard- 
ware and Metal." 

Mr. Henry J. Fuller, manager of The 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal, returned to 
that city on Wednesday from a short 
business trip to New York. 

Mr. das. R. Kinghorn. general sales 
agent for The Montreal Rolling Mills 
Co.. is seriously ill with typhoid fever at 
his home in Westmount. Much sympa- 
thy for him is expressed in Montreal 
business circles, as he had only recently 
returned to his desk after a long illness. 
"Hardware and Metal" wishes him a 
speedy recovery. 



BROKER AND MANUFACTURERS* 
AGENT. 

Geo. W. Weeks, formerly Weeks & 
Kobson, has recently opened up for him- 
self in Vancouver as a broker and manu- 
facturers' agent, and is open to receive 
a few good agencies. Mr. Weeks has 
lived in Vancouver for about 15 vears. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE METROPOLITAN BANK 



CAPITAL PAID UP 
RESERVE FUND 



$1,000,00000 
$1,000,000.00 



DIRECTORS : 



REV. R. H. WARDEN, D.D., 
S. J. MOORE, ESQ., 
Chester D. Massey, Esq., 
D. E. Thomson, Esq., K.C., 



President. 

Vice=President. 

of Massey- Harris Co. 

of Thomson, Lilley & Johnston. 



His Honor W. Mortimer Clark, K.C., Lt.=Gov. Province of Ontario. 



HEAD OFFICE, 



TORONTO, ONT. 



W. D. ROSS, General Manager. 



X 



SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT open at all Branches, and interest allowed at best 
current rates on deposits and added twice a year. 

Statement of the Affairs of the Bank as at December 31st, 1903. 



LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock paid up $1,000,000.00 

Reserve Fund $1,000,000.00 

Rebate on Bills Discounted 6,861.62 

Balance of Profit and Loss 

account carried forward 18,232.31 

1,025,083.93 

Notes of the Bank in circula- 
tion $526,687.50 

Deposits not bearing interest 205,103.31 

Deposits bearing interest (in- 
cluding interest accrued 
to date) 735,031.84 

Deposits by other Banks in 

Canada..'. 5,016.67 

1,471,829.32 



$3,496,913.25 



ASSETS 

Specie and Dominion notes.. $171,341.36 

Deposit with Dominion Gov- 
ernment for security of 
note circulation . .■ 6,036.66 

Notes and cheques of other 

banks 100,517.38 

Balances due from other banks 

in Canada 297,610.20 

Balances due from agents in 

United" Kingdom 20,731.28 

Balances due from agents in 

foreign countries 44,018.94 

Railway and other bonds, de- 
bentures and securities . . 316,226.66 

Call loans secured by bonds, 

debentures and stocks.. 647,833.74 

$1,604,316.22 

Current loans and discounts. .$1,656, 977. 77 

Notes and bills overdue 1 , 139.05 

Bank premises, safes and office 

furniture 233,032.72 

Stationery, etc 1,447.49 

1,892,597.03 

$3,496,913.25 



38 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



OFFICIAL TEXT OF C. I. F. DECISION. 



WE were finable to obtain the texl 
of this decision in time for pub- 
lication in our lasl issue. A 
number of Montreal business men have 
expressed a desire to have a copy <>i' the 
decision l'(U- reference. The full text of 
the decision is as follows: 

SUPERIOR COURT. 

Province of Quebec, District of Montreal. 

The thirty-first day ot December, 1903. 

Present : 

The Hon. Mr. Justice Trenholme. 

The Canada Hardware Co., Limited, Montreal, 

versus 

Suren Hartmann & Co., London, England. 

The court having heard the parties and 
their witnesses, examined the record 
and duly deliberated. 

Seeing that no special or other agree- 
dred and thirty-nine dollars and ninety- 
se\eu cents which it alleges it suffered 
by defendants' failure to insure as they 
were bound to do. certain merchandise 
purchased by ot from defendants under 
the contract with " cost, freight and 
insurance to Montreal'' clause (plain- 
tiff's exhibit No. 1) and which merchan- 
dise was damaged to the extent of said 
sum by salt water on the voyage which 
was a peril of the sea, against which de- 
fendants ought to have insured but did 
not. the only insurance effected thereon 
by the defendants being warranted tree 
from particular average or partial loss, 
except in case of the vessel being strand- 
ed, sunk, burnt or in collision. 

Seeing defendants plead that they fur- 
nished plaintiffs with the insurance 
agreed upon, ami called for by said eon- 
tract and which was the ordinary insur- 
ance, and the kind previously provided 
to plaintiffs ami accepted by him, and 
further that plaintiff is too late in in- 
stiuting its action. 

Seeing thai no special or toher agree- 
ment or usage is proved exempting de- 
fendants from effecting such insurance 
on said merchandise as the law alone re- 
quired them to effect. 

Seeing that no special or other agree- 
by them in effect only cost one-third the 
premium and only covered one-third the 
risk from ordinary perils of the sea, and 
was not such an insurance as said con 
tract and the law called for. 

Seeing that plaintiff has proved that 
said merchandise was damaged by a 
peril of the sea against which defendants 
were bound to insure the same. 

Seeing that no special or other agree- 
plaintiffs from defendants' failure to 
effectually insure said merchandise, as 



they were bound to do. that the plain- 
tiff hath failed to satisfactorily prove 
that it hath incurred the loss of nine 
hundred and three dollars ami eighteen 
cents, claimed by it in the first ship- 
ment of said merchandise, but hath prov- 
ed the loss of two hundred and sixty- 
three dollars and twelve cents, and one 
hundred ami seventy-two dollars and 
ninety-seven cents, on the second anil 
third shipments, making together four 
hundred and thirty -six dollars and nine 
cents. 

Seeing that plaintiff hath proved the 
material allegations of its declaration 
to the extent of four hundred and 
thirty-six dollars and nine cents, and the 
defendants having failed to prove their 
defence. 

I )< th reject defendants' plea. and 
maintain plaintiff's action, and con- 
demy defendants to pay and satisfy to 
plaintiff the said sum of four hundred 
and thirty-six dollars and nine cents, 
with interest thereon from the twentieth 
1 ; October, 1902, and costs. And the 
court doth reserve to plaintiff its righ.t 
and recourse against defendants for all 
loss on said first shipment, should plain- 
til 1 's purchaser thereof make good a 
claim therefor against plaintiff, or should 
plaintiff satisfactorily and legally es- 
tablish that it has really suffered a legal 
loss on said first shipment in conse- 
quence of defendants' said failure to 
insure the same. 

TAXING TRADE CATALOGUES. 

I am glad to see that the manufactur- 
ers' section of the Loudon Chamber of 
Commerce at their last meeting called 
attention to the foolish and unfair prac- 
tice of the Dominion and various col- 
onial Governments in levying an import 
duty on trade catalogues sent from this 
country for circulation in our oversea 
possessions. A strongly worded reso- 
lution was unanimously- adopted, call- 
ing upon the Home Government to bring 
the mattei- to the notice of the colonial 
authorities, with a view of securing the 
admission of catalogues and circulars 
duty free when sent in single copies to 
addressees in Canada, Australia, and 
elsewhere. That catalogues and books 
sent through the post should be taxed 
by an old-fashioned country like Spain 
is not greatly to be wondered at, but 
that go-ahead Governments like those 
of our colonies should descend to such 
extraordinary tactics is surely passing 
strange'. — The Ironmonger. 

39 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEHENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a word first 
insertion; lc. a word each subsequent insertion. 

Contractions count as one word, but five figures (as 
81.000) are allowed as one word. 

Cash remittance to cover cost must accompany all 
advertisements. In no case can this rule be overlook- 
ed. Advertisements received without remittance 
cannot be acknowledged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, five 
cents must be added to cost to cover postage, etc. 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 



A SALESMAN WANT ED— Heating and stove 
experience, for Western Ontario ; state ex- 
perience and salary wanted. Apply at once Box 
91, Hardware and Metal, Toronto. (3) 



p.VRRIAGESMITH WANTED— At once; 
^-> steady job. Apply to Box 5, HARDWARE 
and Metal, Toronto. (f) 

CARRIAGE PAINTERS— Varnish rubbers ; 
on bodies ; also gear men. Box 6, Hard- 
ware and METAL, Toronto. (f) 

ELECTRICIAN WANTED— Interior wireman ; 
to take charge ; must be first-class. Box I, 
Hardware and Metal, Toronto. (f) 

FIRST-CLASS TINSMITH^-Foreman ; steady 
work; state wages. Box 2, Hardware and 
Metal, Toronto. (f) 

HARNESSMAKER WANTED— At once ; 
good wages and steady employment. Box 
3, Hardware and Metal, Toronto. (f) 

HARNESSMAKER— Steady job; principally 
clean work Box 4, HARDWARE AND 
Metal, Toronto. (f) 

WANTED — Experienced hardware clerk ; good 
stockkeeper and salesman ; permanent posi- 
tion and good wages forgood man. Box 7, Hard- 
ware and Metal, (f) 



SITUATIONS WANTED. 



HARDWARE CLERK and bookkeeper ; young 
man ; experienced in general hardware, stoves, 
steamfitters' and plumbers' supplies, wants posi- 
tion; Northwest preferred; rtferences furnished. 
Box 90, Hardware and Metal, Toronto. (4) 

BY a young man wilh 20 years' experience in the 
hardware business, a position of traveller or 
in the warehouse ; best of references as to sobriety 
and ability. Address Z., 73 James street, Ot- 
tawa. . (3) 



Manufacturers' 

:s 



np Hardware and 

10 Metal has in- 

quiries from time 
to time from 
111 a 11 u facturers 

AiTetltS an( * °thers want- 

ed ing representat- 

ives in the leading business centres here 
and abroad. 

Firms or individuals open for agencies 
in Canada or abroad may have their 
names and addresses placed on a special 
list kept for the information of inquirers 
in our various'offices throughout Canada 
and in Great Britain without charge. 
Address 

Business Manager 

Hardware and Metal 
Montreal and Toronto 



Hardware *n<4 



DEPARTMENT OF ADVERTISING 
SUGGESTION AND CRITICISM 



NOTK— Herein are discussed the principles and practice of advertising. Subscrijers are invited tosend Mr. Kirkwood specimens 
of their newspapei and other advertising, for the purpose of review in this department. Address care of Department of Advertis- 
ing, Hardware and Metal. 



Edited by 

John C. 
Kirkwood, 

TORONTO. 



Advertising by Circulars. 

1AM in receipt of a letter and circu- 
lar from a firm of hardware mer- 
chants in a town in one of the 
territories of the Northwest, and 
the request is made that the circu- 
lar be reviewed in these columns. It is 
pleasing to note that in the newly settled 
portions of the Dominion there are mer- 
chants imbued with the spirit of enter- 
prise and who are using modern methods 
for the extension of their trade. In pass- 
ing, I wish to congratulate my corres- 
pondents on the good stationery they 
use. The quality of stationery business 
men use is something that receives little 
attention, but is nono the less a subject 
for comment. Good clothes in another 
direction are properly appreciated, but a 
letter's dress is too often cheap and un- 
worthy,. 

The following circular letter was sent 
out to accompany a "Gem" chopper cook 
book : 

A Few Considerations for the Ladies. 

We are so confident that the " Gem " food 
chopper will please you and save the price of 
itself in six months that we will give you one 
on trial for ten days, and if you are not entirely 
satisfied and delighted with it we will be 
pleased to have you return it. This is a fair 
proposition, and we trust it will appeal to all 
the ladies. Kindly read the enclosed cook 
book and see how the left-overs may be served 
in an appetizing manner instead of being 
thrown out. 

The prices are $2, $2.50 and $3, according 
to size. Another article we wish to bring to 
your notice is the " Enterprise " raisin seeder, 
which we retail at $1.50. 

We also have a very good seeder for $1. 

It is with considerable pride that we invite 
you to inspect our beautiful display of hang- 
ing and table lamps. We feel confident that 
the display is unsurpassed in this district, and 
we would like you to call and insp ct them, 
even if you do not buy. 

We also have a beautiful assortment of 
carvers in cases, silver knives and forks, black 
and white-handled knives, nickle-plated tea 
and coffee pots, also many other articles suit- 
able for Xmas presents. We cordially invite 
you to call and inspect our stock. 
Yours very truly, 

Brown & Black. 

Everything in hardware. 

This circular eomes to us hand-written, 

done extremely well : so legible and neat 

that reading is a pleasure. If it were 

sent out so to the public I Feel sire that 



it was quite as acceptable as printing. 
The great objection to hand-written com- 
munications of an advertising nature is 
the labor involved in their preparation. 
Then, too, unless they are very well done, 
they are discreditable rather than other- 
wise. At the same time there is some- 
thing distinctly personal and intimate in 
a hand-written circular. There are al- 
ways young women or students to be 
found able to do this class of work satis- 
factorily and cheap, so that the expense 
of getting them out need not be very 
great. 

"A few Considerations for the Ladies" 
is the caption of the circular. My own 
choice of a word in this connection woiild 
not be "ladies." The word "ladies" is 
scarcely the one to use. The appeal to 
be made is not to the qualities of gentle- 
ness and refinement that characterize 
womankind. I would say "womenfolk" 
or "housewife" or "mistress of the house- 
hold" as being happier and better. 

The introductory sentence is a little 
abrupt. There is certainly no time 
wasted in getting at business. The cir- 
cular would open more smoothly if it 
began with some such sentence as — "We 
have decided to adopt an unusual method 
of introducing to our customers' notice a 
household article of exceptional merit." 

The word "proposition" is a jarring- 
one to many sensitive people. It has 
come to be regarded as slang by many, 
and therefore offensive. At best it is a 
word to use in talking with men. I sug- 
gest "proposal" as being more dignified 
and acceptable. "Instead of being 
thrown out" following upon "appetizing" 
is not happy. It recalls a story I read 
recently in which a railway engineer with 
a liking for buttermilk sought to find 
some at a neighboring farmhouse. The 
good woman cheerfully supplied the milk, 
remarking that he was fortunate in ar- 
riving- at that moment as she was about 
to give the buttermilk to the pigs. 
"Instead of being thrown out" may be 
omitted altogether without loss. 

In view of the fact that the circular 
was to accompany a food chopper, 1 
think it a mistake to extend its scope so 
as to advertise lamp goods, cutlery, 
etc, The raisin seeder is permissable, 
since it is so eloselj allied to the chop- 
per in mechanism and purpose. It isnot 

40 



wise to introduce those other lines. 
There is a loss of force. Attention to 
the chopper is secured only to be dissi- 
pated. Had the circular been avowedly 
a general one, my criticism would not 
apply, but its purpose has been declared 
to be to emphasize one article, as shown 
in the letter accompanying the circular. 

This is one of the faults of advertising 
— the tendency to tell too much, or to 
tell about too many things. One thing 
at a time, and that done well, applies to 
advertising. The natural end of the cir- 
cular is immediately following the mat- 
ter relating to the raisin seeder. "Every- 
thing in Hardware" is a good phrase, 
and its insistence in every advertisement 
is proper. To get the public to associate 
"Everything in Hardware" with the men- 
tion of the name of Brown & Black is 
profitable advertising without a doubt. 

What I have said about this circular so 
far may seem to savor of pettiness. To 
pick to pieces any honest, well-intended, 
praiseworthy advertisement may seem 
unkind and uncalled for. Under some 
circumstances it is. In the instance be- 
fore us, a review was requested, and I 
sincerely hope that the criticisms made 
will prove helpful to Brown & Black in 
any future undertakings of similar char- 
acter. 

Regarding the circular as a form of 
advertising, opinion may be divided. We 
are all of us familiar with the poorly 
printed, lavishly scattered, unattractive 
"dodger." This, notwithstanuing its 
tailings, accomplishes its object under 
certain circumstances. For the merchant, 
however, I do not counsel its use. I be- 
lieve in the mailed circular, provided the 
circular itself be a good piece of work- 
manship. As a substitute or alternative 
for newspaper advertising I am not so 
ready to commend it. As an adjunct to 
newspaper advertising it is more to be 
trusted. It is extremely difficult to lay 
down hard and fast rules concerning such 
matters. Conditions have to be taken 
into account ; what is good one time. 
one place, may be bad another time, 
another place. For t he retailer brief, 
pointed, enticing advertisements in the 
loeal paper is always good. And, when 
occasion warrants, the eireular is pretty 
sure to repay all outlays in connection 
with its preparation and issue. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 






WINDOW 
GLASS 






FOR DIRECT IMPORTATION 



• 



We are in a position this year to offer you a choice 
between the ordinary quality and packing and an extra 
grade packed in specially strong boxes. 

We offer the ordinary quality and packing at lowest 
prices obtainable, but would ask you to consider our 
special offer as to quality and packing at a small advance 
over the ordinary grade. 

The trade will know the importance of Glass being 
packed in good strong cases to insure delivery in good 
condition. 

Write for our prices. 



THE HOBBS MANUFACTURING CO., 

LIMITED, 

London, - Canada. 



: 



, 






mmtmipmn+wtyth 



41 



Hardware and 
Metol 




Natural Woods and How to Finish 
Them. 

THE revised and enlarged edition of 
this little book on wood finishing' 
is now being sent out by Berry 
Bros., of Detroit, Mich. The first issue 
was so well received that this is bound 
to meet with still wider favor, contain- 
ing as it does much new matter of in- 
terest to both architiects and wood fin- 
ishers. 

The book is practical, eliminating aril 
matter having no direct bearing on the 
subject treated. 

There is nothing experimental in the 
methods given for the various styles and 
methods of wood finishings, all are based 
uf on actual experiences and may be re- 
lied upon as correct. 

The book should be in the hands of 
every architect, decorator and wood fin- 
isher. The little book will serve as a 
useful reference for the architect in 
writing his specifications, and will not 
he found devoid of interest to the de- 
corator or wood finisher. 

The book will be sent free to such 
architects, finishers and those interest- 
ed who ask for it. 

Advertising in Winter Months. 

THE S. W. P., the monthly organ of 
the Sherwin-Williams Co., makes 
the following suggestions to 
agents of that company, which will ap- 
ply in large measure to all retail paint 
dealers: 

" Dees it pay the paint dealer to ad- 
vertise in the newspapers during the 
Winter months? This queston has been 
well and finally answered by the success 
c! those who constantly use newspaper 
space and always keep their paint stock 
before the public. 

" No legitimate reason has been ad- 
vanced-why paint advertisements should 
h • run only during the seasons paint can 
li" applied to exterior surfaces. And 
every rule of good business and every 
feature of the paint trade calls for con- 
tinuous publicity. 

" While no paint may be put on the 
outside of houses in many territories 
during the next few months, property 
owners who are going to paint in Spring 
are interested in paints now, and their 



orders can be securel long before the 
paint goes on the house. In the major- 
ity of instances, it is during the Winter 
months that the property owner con- 
siders and decides on the paints he will 
use. He will be on the look out for the 
best paint for his work, and the mer- 
chant who keeps his proposition before 
him has an immeasurable advantage in 
landing the order. The merchants run- 
ning good newspaper ads on S. W. P. 
during the coming months will have the 
biggest Spring business. 

" Many paint specialties find a large 
sale during the Winter— several have 
their largest market then. Strong news- 
paper advertising of these specialties has 
a double advantage. It not only in- 
creases their sales but keeps the dealer 
in touch with his customers for the large 
Spring orders. 

" By continuing to use newspaner 
space, the paint dealer will hold and in- 
crease the position he has already made; 
by dropping advertising for several 
months, he will be compelled to make 
special efforts to get public attention 
again. 

" There are many electrotypes, illus- 
trated in our electrotype booklet, on S. 
W. P. and various specialties that will 
make good newspaper advertising. We 
shall be pleased to furnish them for 
your newspaper space free of cost." 



Meeting of Shareholders. 

The shareholders of the Canada Paint 
Company are holding their annual meet- 
ing to-day (Saturday) at the company's 
headquarters at 572 William street. 
Montreal. 



Paint and Oil Markets. 

MONTREAL. 

The feature of the week in the paint 
and oil markets has been a sharp ad- 
vance in turpentine which is now vari- 
ously quoted at 88 3-8 to 00 l-4c. per 
gallon for single barrels. The higher 
price seems to obtain with most houses 
and it seems probable that quotations 
will settle at 90 l-4c. for some time. It 
is stated that the advance is partly due 
to a real scarcity but the general feel- 
42 



ing is that the reason is the almost ab- 
solute control of prices by the Standard 
Oil Company. With a great trust in. 
control of prices it is perhaps danger- 
ouse to predict what the outcome will 
be, but the general opinion seems to be 
that prices will now be maintained at 
a high level. A few paint and oil men 
talk of dollar turpentine as a possibil- 
ity. Linseed oil remains steady at pres- 
ent low prices. The volume of business 
during the week shows a marked in- 
crease over last. week and as the orders 
received call for a good range of ma- 
terial prospects from now on are en- 
couraging. We quote : 

Ground White Lead-Best brands, Gov- 
ernment standard, $4.60 to $4.75; No. 1, 
$4.25 to $4.40; No. 2, $4 to $4.10; No. 
3, $3,671-2 to $3,771-2; No. 4, $3.30 to 
$3.40, all f.o.b. Montreal. 

Dry White Lead.— $4.25 in casks, and 
in kegs $4.50. 

Dry White Zinc— Pure dry, in casks, 
61-4c; in 100-lb. kegs, 6 3-4c; No. 1, 
zinc, in casks, 51-4c; in 100-lb kegs, 
5 3-4c. 

White Zinc (ground in oil)— Pure, 25- 
lb. irons, 8c. ; No. 1, 7c. ;■ No. 2, 6c. 

Putty.— We quote: Bulk, in barrels, 
$1.50; in 25-lb. tins and irons, $1.85; 
bladded putty in barrels, $1.75. 

Orange Mineral.— Casks, 7c; 100-lb. 
kegs, 71-4c; smaller quantities, 8 l-4c 

Red Leads.— Genuine red lead, in 
casks, $4.25; in 100-lb. kegs, $4.50; in 
less quantities, $5.50 per 100 lb. No. 1 
red lead, casks $3 ; kegs, $4.25, and smal- 
ler quantities, $5.25. 

Litharge.— Ground, casks, 5c; in less 
quantities, 51-2c; flake litharge, casks, 
$5; smalls, $5.50 per 100 lb. 

Linseed Oil— Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 47c; 
5 to barrels. 46c; boiled, 1 to 4 bar- 



GABRIEL & SCHALL, 

205 Pearl St., NEW YORK. 

IMPORTERS 

LITHOPONE, Oxide of Zinc, 

BARYTES (Crude and Powdered), 

SULPHATE OF BARYTES ia 8K£-k 
CARBONATE OF BARYTES 

(Precipitated) 
BLANC FIXE (Dm- andPWHP). 

DRY COLORS, 

DRIERS, f'»' PAINT AND VARNISH 

"BRUNSW7cl( 7r ATPHALT MASTIC 



BITUMEN 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and 
Metal 




Raw and Boiled 

" GUARANTEED PURE" 

tfANUrACTURED BY 



Canada Linseed Oil Mills 



MONTREAL, 



LIMITED, 



et BARRELS WANTED!! 

We are open to buy good sound, oak 

Linseed Oil, Turpentine, Varnish, and 
Machine Oil Barrels. 



McArthur. Corneille & Co, 



MONTREAL 



lu 



nd Gelatin 



An extensive assortment, to suit all requirements 
WILL BE PLEASED TO SUBMIT SAMPLES AND PRICES. 



MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF . 



A 



White Lead, Oils and Colors, 
Prepared Paints, Window 
Glass, Varnishes, Etc. 



SELLING AGENTS IN CANADA 



For the GENUINE 

Imperial French Green 

of JOHN LUCAS & CO., 

PHILADELPHIA. 



And CELEBRATED 

English Varnishes 

of CHAS. TURNER & SON, 
LONDON. :* 



Please mention Hardware and Metal when writing. 




FINE WORDS 



STERLING 



FOR 



*%*&. 



PREPARED 



C* 



PAINTS 



butter no parsnips." Fine words won't make 

STERLING PAINTS 

good. But honesty of intention, and purity of materials, 
and high-grade machinery — and knowledge of the art of 
mixing — will and must. 

STERLING PAINTS 



are good because they are made good, not because we say 
they are good. Stock them for 1904. 



THE STERLING PAINT PEOPLE 



nto 



(GRANT-HAMILTON OIL CO., LIMITED) 

Montreal Winnipeg 



Hardware and 
Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



rels, 50c; 5 to 9 barrels, 49c Delivered 
in Ontario between Montreal and Osha- 
wa at 2e. per gallon advance. 

Turpentine— Single barrels, 00 1 -4c. ; 
2 to 4 barrels, 891-4c. Standard gallon 
of 8.6 pounds. 

Benzine.— 25 to 26c. 

Shellac Varnish.— Pure white, $2.60 
to $2.80; pure orange, $2.60 to $2.80; 
No. 1 orange shellac, $2.40 to $2.60. 

Mixed Paints.— $1.20 to $1.40 per gal- 
lon. 

Castor Oil.— 8 3-4 to 91-4c. in whole- 
sale lots, and l-2c. additional for small 
lots. 

Canadian Paris Green — Barrels, 
ltl-4c; arsenic kegs, 14 l-2c. ; 50 and 
100 lb. drums, 15c, ; 25-lb. drums, 15 l-4c ; 
1-lb. packages, 16c; 1-2-11). packages, 
18c.; 1-lb. tins, 17c. Terms 2 per cent, 
discount for cash in 30 days or 90 days 
net. 

English Paris Green.— 50 and 100 lb. 
drums, 15c. per lb. ; 25 lb. drums, 15 l-2c ; 
1-lb. paper boxes, 16c. ; 1-lb. tin boxes, 
17c. Terms. 2 per cent. 30 days; 90 
days net. 

TORONTO. 

Tlie* feature of the market is the 
rapid rise in turpentine prices at Sa- 
vannah this week, where prices have 
gone up 4e. in the week. In consequence 
of this prices have advanced 6c. per gal- 
lon < n the local market, This makes 
the price 10 to lie. higher than at this 
time last year. The reason for the pres- 
ent, strong tone in the market is given 
in the statistics given out by the Savan- 
nah Board of Trade, showing receipts 
to date of 181,701 bbls. as compared with 
2S'.S27 bbls. last year. The receipts 
on hand are about the same as last year 
so the supply at the disposal of the trade. 
tit shipments to date, have been only 
169,135 against 272,257 bbls. last year. 
1'ieseiil prices on llie Canadian market 
are nominal. An advance might result 
from further rise at Savannah or a de- 
cline as a result of outside competition. 
Linseed oil prices are unchanged. It 
is noted, however, that orders booked 
''. r forward delivery must be signed by 
t!i' customers and no change will be al- 
lowed when delivered as agreed. High- 
er prices are now quoted on Canadian 
Paris green. ( 'ompel il ii n in this line 
is keen. While and red lead are stead- 
ier than for some lime. Other lines are 

npchanged. 

White Lead — Ex-Toronto, pure white 
lead, $4.75; No. 1. $4.30; No. 2, $4; No. 
:;. +:;.(;<>; \o. 4, +;>.:;;> in packages of 2."> 

Hi. and upwards; 1 -2c. per lb. extra will 



be charged for 12 1-2-lb. packages; gen- 
uine dry white lead, in casks, $4,871-2. 

Red Lead— Genuine, in casks of 560 
lb., $4.25 to $4.50; ditto, in kegs of 100 
lb., $4.75; No. 1, in casks of 560 lb., $4; 
ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $4.25. 

Litharge— Genuine, 6 to 6 l-2c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M.. 
in casks, $6 to $11.2."): Lehigh, in casks, 
$6 to $6.25. 

Shingle Stain— In 5-gallon lots, 60 to 
85c. per gallon. 

Paris White— 90c. to $1 per 100 lb. 

Whiting— 60 to 65c. per 100 lb.; Gild- 
ers' whiting, 75 to 80c. 

Shellac— Pure orange, in, barrels 
$2.45; white, $2.60 per gallon; No. 1, 
15c. less; in less quantities 30c, extra, 
including price of can. 

Pumice Stone— Powdered, $2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity; lump, 10c, in smal lots and 
8c. in bbls. 

Linseed Oil— Raw, 1 to 2 bbls., 50c; 
boiled, 53c; 3 to 5 bbls., raw, 49c; boil- 
ed, 52c; 6 to 9 bbls., raw, 48c; boiled. 
51c, delivered. To Toronto, Hamitlon 
and London, 2c less. 

Turpentine— Single bbls.. 92c; 2 to 
4 bbls., 91c, delivered; 5 bbls. and over, 
open. Toronto, Hamilton and London, 
2c less. For less quantites than bar- 
rels. 5c per gallon extra will be added. 
and for 5-gallon packages, 50c and 10- 
gallon packages, 80c. will be charged. 

Glues— Broken sheet, in 200-lb. bbls.. 
8 lo 81-2c per lb.: cabinet glue, in bbls.. 
11 1-2 to 12c; emery glue, in bbls.. 17c; 
bookbinders', ground, 101-2c; finest 
American, white, 19c: No. 1 American 
white, 15c per lb. 



Putty— Common. $1.65; pure , bladders 
in barrels, $2.25; bladders, in 100-lb. 
kegs. .+2.4(1; bulk, in barrels, $2.05; bulk, 
less than barrels and up to 100 lb., $2.95. 

Plaster Paris— New Brunswick. $2 
per bbl. 

Liquid Paints— Pure, $1.20 to $1.40 

per gallon; No. 1. $1.10 per gallon. 

Barn Paints— 65 to 70c. per gallon. 
Castor Oil— English, in cases, 71-2 In 
8c per pound, and 81-2 to 9c. for single 

tins. 

English Paris. Green— Petroleum 
bids., 14 1-4c: arsenic kegs, 141-2c; 50 
to 100-lb. drums, 15c: 1-lb. packages, 
16c; 1-lb. tins. 17c: 1-2-lb. packages, 
1-2-lb. tins, 19c 

Canadian Paris Green (present deliv- 
ery) —Petroleum bbls., 141-2c: arsenic 
kt,gs, 141-2c; 50 and 100-lb. drums, 15c; 
1-lb. packages, 16c; 1-lb. tins. 17c; 
1-2-lb. packages. 18c. 



ST. JOHN 

There begins to be rather less demand 
ior burning oil. The very high price 
and the lengthening days both tend to 
this result. Lubricating* have atten- 
ti<n: prices are firm. This is the line 
in which there is the chief competition. 
Linseeds are low but turpentine holds 
fiim. Fish oils are scarce and high. 

WINDOW GLASS. 

MONTREAL. 

Prices on import glass for 1904 are 
out this week indicating a drop id' about 
5 cents per box as compared with last 
year's prices. There is not much ac- 
tivity in glass at present and prices as 
quoted below are being well maintained 



AN ATTRACTIVE PACKAGE 

is a great factor when selling ready mixed paints, but unless the con- 
tents are to be relied upon, the dealer will not get repeat orders. 



ANCHOR LIQUID PAINT 



not only put up in the most attractive packages, but the contents 
give satisfaction. It is ->uperior to any other i 
being the only ready mixed paint on the market 
that contains BRANDRAM'S B.B. GENUINE 

White Lead the standard of the world. 



Send us a pest card 

and let us tell you 

all about it. 



TRADE MARK 

HENDERSON & POTTS, Limited, Halifax. 
HENDERSON & POTTS CO., Limited, Montreal; 





44 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and 
Metal 



ALABA5TINE 



'Way back in the Seventies the writer of this ad. was on the road selling " Church's ALABASTINE. 
of the dealer was : " You create the demand and we will buy.'' 



It was new then and the universal cry 



Through persistent advertising the work of creating the demand has been carried on until the present time might be termed " The Alabastine 
Age," for it is a fact that to sell other wall coatings they have to be recommended " the same thing " or " as good as \LABAST1NF " TIME 
THE NEVER FAILING TEST, has proven our claim of superiority. Kalsomine preparations are good- to keep-and are most prominent-in 
in the inventory! ALABASTINE SELLS READILY, and at a good margin of profit: 

Be wise unto your day and generation, and order ALABASTINE. " Do it now,'' from any Wholesale Hardware or Paint Dealer, or 

THE ALABASTINE CO., Limited, PARIS, ONT. 



en what little business is passing. We 
again quote as follows: First break, 50 
feet, $1.70; second brake, $1.80 for 50 
feet. First break, 100 feet, $3.25; sec- 
ond break, $3.45; third break. $3.95; 
fourth break, $4.20. 

TORONTO. 

A fair business is doing, with com- 
petition resulting in some cutting. 
We quote as follows : Star, under 26 in., 
$3.10; 26 to 40 in., $3.30; 41 to 50 in., 
$3.70; 51 to 60 in., $4; 61 to 70 in., 
$5 ; 71 to 80 in., $4.30 net, Toronto, Ham- 
ilton and London. 

Standard Paint & Varnish Works 

Limited 

Makers of High-Grade Varnishes, Japans, 
Paints, Colors and Enamels. 

WINDSOR, ONT. 



RC TUHDMIT 768 Craig St., 
. C. InUIMlC, MONTREAL 

Wholesale Agent and Importer 

Dry Colors, Ochres, Bronze Powders, 
Aluminum Powder, Schlag Metal, 
Bronze Liquids and Varnishes. 

Toronto Office— 29 Melinda St. 



HARDWARE AND METAL is the only journal in Canada concerning 
itself with the paint, oil and glass interests. Its markets are trust- 
worthy and full. 



GRADE 




JNToble® Sf JUoare. 

CORNWALL EOAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENC. 

Banufacturers ot 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 



Which can be obtained direct from the works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada. 



',„ 



Paints and Paints 




Some are good, some poor. If GLOBE PAINTS were 
poor they wouldn't be 9 years on the market. It takes 
a good article to live as long as that. We are not only 
living, but growing. That means a good deal. 

—When our salesman calls on you, pay good heed 
to what he has to say. 



The 6lobe Paint Co., 

Limited 

422-424 Adelaide St. W., Toronto. 



"Island City" Paint and Varnish Works 




Our " Island City" Enamel Paints 

are the best in the market — \y artistic shades. 

Our "Island City" Aluminum. Gold 
and Silver Paints can be used with 
great satisfaction on Furnaces, Radiators, all 
sorts of Furniture and Ornaments that require 
renovating. 



P. D. DODS & CO., Proprietors, Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




THE 

CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY, 

LIMITED, 

of Montreal and Toronto, take pleasure 
in calling attention to their colors for 
painting purposes. Cards will be mailed 
upon request. 

The demand for painting material is 
very marked and has led to a flood of 
poor and unsatisfactory paint being 
brought forward to make sales at any 
cost. 

Our manufactures are all high-class. 
Each tin is warranted, and our paints 
and varnishes are only sold through re- 
liable and legitimate dealers. Every 
progressive hardware and paint mer- 
chant, who is desirous of extending his 
business, has for sale the manufactures 
of the 

CANADA PAINT COMPANY 

The Canada Paint Company's ready- 
mixed paints are ground to impalpable 
fineness in special mills, and no paints 
made by hand or in old style "mixers" 
can begin to compare with them for 
covering properties, uniformity and 
durability. 

To avoid vexation and disappoint- 
ment please see that the Canada Paint 
Company's name is upon each package. 

First Hands for reliable dry colors, 
including 



PARIS 
GREEN, 



which is being booked more freely 
than ever before. 




* 



Window and Interior 
Displays 



* 



Interior Order. 

THE first impression gained by 
the customer upon entering the 
store determines the pleasure 
with which the purchases are 
made and the amount of future 
business. If the general feeling is satis- 
factory, if the mind is not taken up with 
dodging stock placed helter-skelter over 
the floor, if the arrangement and order is 
of such a kind as to impart a feeling of 
rest, the customer goes about his business 
with a high regard for the firm and its 
methods and will return at the first oppor- 
tunity. The reason for this is easily dis- 
covered by the merchant, if he would 
attempt to analyze his own feelings upon 
entering any other place of business. The 
difficulty to be combatted in his case is 
that in his criticism of the arrangement 
of another store his mind grasps only 
particular objects, rather than the general 
fault, and it will mostly be found to rest 
really upon the latter. For instance, he 
will argue conclusively that a certain 
barrel that is occupying a prominent posi- 
tion in the ce*ntre of the floor should be 
removed to the store-room ; that those 
boxes or bags on the counter should give 
place to neater articles or to a clear space ; 
that the office should not be so near the 
front of the store where it breaks in on 
the business appearance of the place. But 
he does not appear to have resolved all 
these into the one general criticism — that 
there is lack of order, that there is in gen- 
eral a thoughtless arrangement of goods. 
With his mind satisfied as to the faults 
existing in his neighbor's place of busi- 
ness, he returns to his own store, observes 
that no barrel occupies the objectionable 
position, that his counters are free from 
boxes and bags and that his office is 
carefully situated in an out-of-the-way 
corner, and he then concludes that he is 
free from the faults seen elsewhere, and is 
thankful he is not as other men are. At 
the same time, he may allow a lew bar- 
rels in positions that are only a degree 
more suitable ; his counters may be filled 
up with cartons, samples of bulk goods 
or other packages, and his office may be 
even more conspicuous in its unsightly 
exterior. And his neighbor may come in 
and congratulate himself that he has 
avoided mistakes that the first critic has 
made. Neatness must exist in ever, 

4« 



successful store, and to obtain this the 
stock should be confined as much as pos- 
sible to the shelves, show cases and fix- 
tures specially made for the purpose. 

One Dealer's Experience. 

ONE retailer gives an interesting ex- 
perience as follows: "The ways 
that you may fix your window are in- 
numerable to appeal to the passers by, and 
he who stops to look, if you will notice, 
will almost invariably look for your sign 
to see who did it and he usually remem- 
bers the place. 1 know, for a year after 
we had made one display we heard people 
remark on passing, ' That's the window 
that got the write-up in the papers.' That 
window was undoubtedly our master piece 
and the advertising that we received from 
it was worth a full page advertisement in 
any paper. We covered the glass with 
black cloth and at about the height that 
the average man could see through we cut 
two holes and over each we placed the 
sign ' For Men Only.' Back from the 
window we made two stalls and lined and 
covered them with black cloth and had a 
light in each. In one we put razors, 
knives, razor strops, cork screws and a 
can opener, in the other, mechanics' tools. 
This display was made during one of our 
carnivals when the town was filled with 
strangers and the entire town was out 
each day on parade and sight seeing, and 
the fun that we had from the window and 
the appeal it made to the passers by, was 
by far the best advertising that we ever 
did ; but we got more from it, than just 
the look that was given the window. One 
day a very pious maiden passed the store, 
saw the sign ' For Men Only,' was 
shocked, rushed home, told father, a good 
deacon, the liberties taken during the 
carnival and related what she termed a 
disgrace to permit such a show on the 
main street where even women and boys 
were looking. Papa's wrath, could not be 
imagined ; off he rushed to the police 
station, lodged his complaint, and a detail 
of policemen were immediate!) ordered 
to investigate. It took but a minute, and 
when they returned and informed papa 
what was exhibited behind the black cloth, 
with the enticing sign, there was a good 
laugh and a much disgusted papa. It 
leaked out, the paper got hold of it, and 
the write-up of the affair was good money 
in our coffers. The window did it and 
the write-up cost nothing. That window 
wasn't fixed in a half hour, but we were 
well repaid for our trouble." 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Held up for Your Approval 



A poor article is no bargain at any price. Doubtless the 
expert painter realizes this truism about as much as anybody 
in the world ; with him a poor out-of-date brush, upon which 
^■■ ■ '■'«* he has to spend time in winding by old fashioned methods, 
means loss of money and inferior work to hisdetriment. 

Boeckh's Flexible Bridled 
Paint Brushes 



OPERATING: 

Boeckh's Toronto Factories. 
Bryan's London Factories. 
Cane's Newmarket Factories. 

MONTREAL BRANCH: 



are the kind that are stocked by progressive Dealers, because 
they are demanded now by all progressive Painters, 

— The bridle can be easily removed and replaced ; it is not affected 
— by water, oil or paint ; it works on a pivot, and keeps the 
— bristles elastic. 

UNITED FACTORIES, 

Head Off ice : TORONTO, ONT. LIMITED. 

and 3 DeBresoles St. LONDON BRANCH: 71 Dundas St. 



Don't TaKe CKances. 





Don't take chances of losing your customer by selling 
him an inferior paint. 

You may make money out of him once, but he is gone 
forever. 

Give him a satisfactory paint. 

Sell him "Ark" Brand, as our Clarksburg customer 
intends doing. Read what he says: 

Clarksburg, January 9, 04. 
Messrs. The Francis -Fi:ost Co., Limited, 

Toronto. « 

Dear Sirs :— I intend handling your "Ark" Brand paint 
exclusively this year. I have tried several other makes anil 
have come to the conclusion that for fair dealing and good 
honest goods yours are the best. 

I would like you to send me some of those black and white 
ruts I have seen in "Hardware and Metal. " I want to use them 
in our local paper. Yours truly, 

T C. Battram, 

Act on Mr. Battram's experience and stock "Ark" Brand 
Paint. You will never regret it. 



Francis-Frost C?/:*, 



ited 




TORONTO, ONT. 

Canadian Distributing Agents for Grippin's CracK Filler and "Mviresco" "Wall Finish, 



47 



Hardware and 
Metal 




D 



Toronto Plumbers Talk Wages. 

URING the past few weeks com- 
mittees representing- the Toronto 
Master Plumbers' Asoeiation and 
the Toronto Journeymen Plumbers' 
Union have been in frequent consulta- 
tion regarding wages. The men are ask- 
ing for an advance but no decision has 
jet been reached. It is hoped to have 
everything settled by February. 

The Plumbers' Union have appointed 
J. Prestly their business agent to suc- 
ceed David Bell, who is leaving for 
Winnipeg on Saturday. 



Criticizing Toronto Plumbers. 

^pHE efforts of the Toronto Master 
1 Plumbers' Association to secure 
a strong organization have been 
successful, if the statements appearing 
in the daily press are to be credited. The 
Toronto Star has the following this 
week : 

" This Master Plumbers' Association 
is all right for the big firms, but the 
smaller plumbers get but little out of it, 
no matter what price is charged," re- 
marked an independent plumber to-day. 
" The small man is held up right and 
left, and he cannot help himself. Some 
of them recognize the situation and 
would like to drop out of the game, but 
the big fellows have such a firm grip 
upon their necks that they cannot wrest 
free, but have to hang on and subsist 
as best they can on the crumbs that fall 
their way. All the fat contracts go to 
the big firms. The big firms control 
the entire situation. When a big thins' 
comes along any little fellow who tries 
to land it is politely informed that a 
big firm claims the job, and the asso- 
ciation gives it to him. 

" You know on a house job so much 
is added on for each additional tender 
called by the builder, and the man who 
gets the contract has to puny up. He 
takes all the chances on mistakes in 
tendering, and all other risk, and in the 
ends gets but little more than the man 
who just put in a tender on the job. The 
big fellows are playing both ends against 
the middle in this game of hold-up. The 
big firms are all interested in the manu- 
facture of supplies, and they make the 
members of the association pay through 
tne nose for them, too. . . A com- 
parison of the prices showed exactly the 
sort of a hold-up the citizens were forced 
to submit to. A thirty-gallon boiler 
which cost the ring plumber $5.50 cost 
the householder or builder $14, install- 
ed, yet to install the boiler is a matter 
of only a couple of hours' work. There 
are two joints to wipe to install such a 



boiler. A common tap costs the man in 
t! c association 27c, yet he charges citi- 
zens $2.50 for putting one in, and any 
plumber can put one in an hour. An 
overflow basin costs GO cents. To put it 
in is a matter of two hours' labor and 
ten cents' worth of plaster paris, yet the 
ring price for the job is $3. 

" The tariff of the Master Plumbers' 
Association calls for $1 a light for gas," 
remarked this independent plumber. "I 
have been putting them in right along 
for 70 cents a light, and making monev, 
too." 

Evidently there are a few sore heads 
in Toronto. They exist everywhere. 



Montreal Plumbers Busy. 

THE Christmas holiday week and 
the first two weeks of the year 
which are ordinarily very quiet 
weeks for the plumbers have this year, 
on account of the prolonged cold snap, 
brought them a harvest of work. A 
prominent Montreal plumber assures 
' ' Hardware and Metal ' ' that not for 
years has this season of the year seen 
plumbers in Montreal so rushed with 
vvcrk. The work has consisted in re- 
pairing the injuries wrought by the 
ravages of Jack Frost and the supply 
houses report an unprecedented de- 
mand for iron pipe. 

Of new business apart from these re- 
pairs, there is practically none at pres- 
ent in the hands of Monti'eal plumbers 
and a few quiet weeks may be expected. 
Prospects are, however, considered very 
satisfactory as the number of building 
permits issued during the last few 
months indicates a busy season in the 
building trades. Very few contracts 
for plumbing have been let so early in 
the season, but quite a number are 
bound to be assigned in the very near 
future. An examination of the list issu- 
ed during the Summer and Fall shows 
that nearly all permits have been for 
dwelling houses. Very few permits have 
been issued for large buildings. Now a 
huge " skyscraper " means work for 
some plumbing firm equal in value to 
that on a great number of residences, 
Ihil il is not apt to be distributed among 
a Dumber of firms. Hence although 
there are very few prizes of this sort to 
be secured by Montreal plumbers there 
should be a fair amount of work for all 
concerned .on the numerous residences to 
be ei'ected. 

The journeymen's union seems to have 
been taken by surprise by the prompt 
action of the master plumbers in refus- 
ing to treat with theufc as a union. The 
agreement of the master plumbers, pub- 
lished in a recent issue of " Hardware 

48 



and Metal " has been signed by prac- 
tically all the master plumbers of the 
city. They are standing together well 
and it seems likely that they will score 
their point in the present dispute. There 
does not seem to be any disposition 
among the master plumbers to reduce 
the wages of their journeymen. A num- 
ber of them have expressed their inten- 
tion to raise the wages of their more 
competent workmen. But there is a 
determination expressed on all sides 
that under no circumstances will the 
union be recognized. The master plumb- 
ers are determined to reserve to them- 
selves the right to employ any journey- 
man whether a member of the union or 
net, and they will treat with their jour- 
neymen only as individuals, not as a 



Disposal of House Sewage. 

THE articles on " The Disposal of 
House Sewage for Farm Houses," 
by M. J. Quin'n, Toronto, in the 
October 24 arid 31 issues of " Hard- 
ware and Metal," attracted general at- 
tention. 

Several enquiries have been received 
since their pulblication, such as: " Is 
the septic tank system practicable in 
Northwestern Canada where the ground 
in Winter freezes to a depth of from 
four to six feet? Would not the sew- 
age in the tiles freeze? (2) Would 
not the inlet pipe conduct the smells 
arising from the tank back indirectly 
to the different rooms, even consider- 
ing that it does run to the roof? 

In answer to the .first question, it may 
be stated that there are a considerable 
number of " septic tanks " in operation 
north of Sault Ste. Marie, where the 
temperature in Winter goes down to 40 
degrees .below zero, and that these have 
given perfect satisfaction. Mr. Quinn, 
author of the articles referred to, savs 
the sewage in the tiles will not freeze 
because the hot gases of decomposition 
given off, together with the presence of 
a large percentage of salts and am- 
monia, keep the liquid sewage at a tem- 
perature always as high as 58 degrees. 
In answer to the second question, Mr. 
Quinn states that traps effectually pre- 
vent the vise of bad smells from the 
tank to the rooms of a house. Of course 
it is taken for granted that the inlet 
pipe running also to the roof. The gas 
or air in this pipe being warm has a 
tendency to rise. This causes a suc- 
tion which takes up any gas that might 
b<3 lingering about an individual trap. 
lu addition every fixture has its own 
trap. There must be no trap between 
th • septic tank and the roof but a free 
passage in inlet pipe. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




RAMSAY'S 
PAINTS 

GET 
READY ! 

Look after your trade for 1904, it's going to be a big one. 

Have you got a decent share of the trade in your town ? 
If not, let us get after it for you with Ramsay's Paints. 

Ramsay's Paints talk and bring you trade that pays. 

Ramsay's Paints sell at a price that nobody grumbles 
about — the lowest price for the best paint — not too high for 
profit making. 

Let us tell you about it. 



A. RAMSAY & SON 
MONTREAL 



EST'D 
1842 



THE PAINT 
MAKERS 



THE AUER 
GAS LAMP 

"Turns night-time into day-time " 



NEW MODELS. 



LOWER PRICES. 



We offer you the best made lamp on the 
market, built scientifically. 

We offer you a lamp that will 
light your store for half the 
cost of kerosene. 

We offer you a lamp that is safer 
than a coal oil one. 

We offer you a lamp which you 

can sell at a good profit. No. 25 

] ^- 100 Candle Power. 

Do you want the Aflency for it ? 




THEN WRITE FOR 



OUR CATALOGUE AND DISCOUNTS. 

EVERY LAMP GUARANTEED. 



AUER LIGHT CO., 1682 NOTRE DAME ST., MONTREAL. 



4 - M - M ' I ■■ ! ■■ ! ■ ! ■■ ! ■ l .. i .. i .. H .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. H " H"I " H " I " H -t-H^"H- ■H- I - M » I " I » I " : » ! " I " I » I " M " ! "I"I"1 || I"1" 1"I " 1 1| I I '1 II M l - M - H - I - 

There is a standing joke that steam-fitters prefer to put in poor piping and 
radiators so they will pay them a dividend in the shape of repair bills. Of course 
this is all wrong, and probably originated in the poor radiators with leaky connec- 
tions which flood the market. But you don't have to use these. Use only the best. 
Supply your customers with 

Oxford Hot Water Heaters 
~ Oxford Radiators 

They form the highest class of heating apparatus on the market. We would 
like to have you investigate their merits. Call or write us anytime. 



The Gurney Foundry Company, Limited, 

Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver 

The Gurney-Massey Company, Limited, 

Montreal. 



T 



• r - I - I - l - M '- M - I - r - I - l - I - I - I - I - I - I - I - I - I - I - I - I - I - I - I " ! " ! " ! " ! " ! " ! - : - »S" ! " H " M - -H- 

49 



~l^.j..HH~S**W-**M~H^-HH-H~i~H« 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



§ "Dominion Brand" Tarred Felt. 



THE BEST THAT MONEY CAN BUY. 



" Shield Brand " Ready Roofing, 2 and 3-ply. 

— — QUICK SELLERS. 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY- 



SLockerby & McComb, 65 Shannon St., Montreal 
Bell Telephone Main 1989. 



r 



T7S HOCKEY STICKS. 

(fajtin. I ©Made of the best selected and seasoned stock — carefully modelled 
/p^ Ci j^ c )"*|and finished. To retail at from 10c, to 50c. each. 

^NERLICH & CO., 146=8 Front st. w., Toronto 



^ 



V. 




1904 



After years of experience we have 
been able to still further improve our 
line of AXES, an d are now offering the 
best value ever placed before the Cana- 
dian hardware trade. You stand to gain 
by waiting to see our samples and obtain 
our prices. 

DIJNDAS AXE WORKS, 

DLNDAS, ONT. 



'!< i 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



INDUSTRIAL GOSSIP 



Hardware and Metal would be pleased to receive from any authoritative source industrial news of any sort, the 
formation or incorporation of companies, establishment or enlargement of mills, factories foundries or other 
works, railway or mining news, etc. All such correspondence will be treated as confidential when desired. 



THE Rainy River Curling Co., Rainy 
River, Otit., have been incorpor- 
ated with a capital of $10,000, to 
construct and operate a curling rink. 
The directors are D. Robertson, H. Car- 
son, J. A. Mathieu and .las. Clarkson, 
all of Rainy River. 

The Telford Lumber Co., Prince Albert, 
Saskatchewan, have been incorporated 
with a capital of $368,000, to build and 
operate saw nulls and to carry on a 
general lumbering' business. The directors 
are J. N. Telford, D. H. Telford, H. A. 
Beard, J. W. Telford, all of Prince Al- 
bert ; W. A. Telford, Benson, Minn.; and 
Mary. Jane Telford, Winnipeg. 

The Canada Inspection Co., .Montreal. 
have been incorporated with a capital of 
X10.000, to inspect railroads, bridges and 
structural materials, and to furnish ex- 
perts in matters involving knowledge in 
civil, metallurgical and chemical engineer 
ing. The directors are T. F. Griffiths, F. 
A. Bickerdike and P. C. Ryan, all of 
Montreal, and A. A. Wighton, Toronto. 

The large mill that The Canada Corun- 
dum Co. are erecting at Craigmont. Ren- 
frew County, is now almost completed 
and will be in operation in the course of 
two weeks. It is claimed to be larger 
than any ore concentration mill in Can- 
ada. Its capacity will be 300 tons per 
day. The mill has been built on the unit 
system, and its capacity can readily be 
increased if necessary. 

A London, Eng., despatch says that 
British iron firms are greatly interested 
in the arrival at Glasgow yesterday of a 
cargo of Canadian pig iron from Cape 
Breton. No shipment of Canadian iron 
has reached Glasgow for almost two 
years, due to the fact that Canadian 
producers haVe secured better prices at 
home and in the United States. This 
import also marks the drying up of 
British shipments to America. 

COM PR ESSE I < AIK VS. STEAM. 

The Corporation Trust Co. have offered 

to supply Toronto with electrical power 
at one-half the present cost. In connec- 
tion with this oiler Mr. B. Sawyer says 
that the company had already an experi- 
mental plant at Sore], and was building 
a much more extensive plant at St. Lam 
bert, across the river from Montreal. 

Mr. Sawyer explained that the company 
generated power which produced cold 



Compressed air. This was delivered into 
ordinary steam engines and generated 
electrical power. As the cost of com 
pressing the air was not one-tenth of the 
cost of producing the same power by 
steam, the company could afford to sell 
power at one half the prevailing rate. 

Mr. Sawyer added that the company 
was prepared to carry out its offer. 

NOTES. ! 

Collingwood and The ('ramp Steel Co. 
will seek to have their agreement altered. 

Orillia wants to raise §100,000 to spend 
on its electrical power transmission 
works. 

The Schomberg and Aurora Railway 
Co. wants the Township of King- empow- 
ered to pay it a bonus. 

The Lanark County Council intend buy- 
ing road-making machinery and to spend 
xOT.OOn in building 120 miles of road. 

North Bay wants to. raise $50,000 to 
meet floating debt, to build a town and 
fire-hall, and to extend the waterworks. 

The Hamilton, Beamsville. and Grims- 
by Railway wants a by-law confirmed 
and power to build branches and estab- 
lish parks. 

The Sandwich, Windsor, and Amherst 
burg Railway wants a bond issue of 
sfiOO.000 confirmed. It also wants to 
take over the Windsor system. 

-1. TT. Cobnrn. Walkerville. applies for a 
charter for an electric railway from 
Windsor. via Walkerville. to Chatham. 
"with power to operate on Sundays." 

It is said that the outlook for the Pic 
ton coal fields is verv promising-. Tt has 
been predicted that within three years 
there will be an output of ^00.000 tons. 

The Strathroy and Western Counties 
Railway will seek power from the Ontario 
Legislature to extend their authorized 
line through the pity of St. Thomas and 
on to Port Stanley. 

Laidlaw. Kappele & Bicknell. solicitors 
for The Lake Superior Power Co., etc.. 
apply for legislation to confirm a Sault 
Ste. Marie by-law (No. 398L and confirm- 
ing the agreements entered info by it. 

Hodgson, Sumner &i Co.. Montreal. 
Have been incorporated with a capital of 
SI, 000, 000, to carry on a genera] dry- 
goods store. The directors are J. Hodg- 
son. G. Sumner, J. Gardner. W. C. Hodg 
son and F. Sumner, all of Montreal. 



The Brantford and Erie Railway Co. 
will seek incorporation. It propo 
build a line from Brantford. via Water 
ford anil Simeoe. to Port Dover, with a 
loop line from Waterl'ord. via Delhi and 
Lynedoch, to Simeoe. 

Thi' A. B. Savior Canning Co., Bloom 
held. Out., have been incorporated with a 
capital of S III, llllll, to manufacture ami 
deal in canned goods. The directors are 

A. B. Savior, C. II. Savior and C. M. 
Yarwood. all of the township of Hallo 
well. 

The Scliierholt/ Zinkaun Co., Waterloo. 
Out., have been incorporated with a 
capital of ^50,000, to manufacture and 
deal in furniture and mattresses. The 
directors are Emil Schierholtz, H. S. 
Zinkaun, both of Waterloo, and E. Zink- 
aun, of Berlin, Out. 

Hodgson Bros., Montreal, have been in 
corporated with a capital of $250,000, to 
take over the business of Hodgson Bros., 
of Montreal. The directors are A. .1. 
Hodgson, H. A. Hodgson, H. A. Olive. 
all of Westmount, .Montreal ; .1. H. Hodg- 
son, New York, and J. J. Towers. .Mont- 
real. 

The Montreal Transportation Co., 
Montreal, have been incorporated with a 
capital of §500,000, to carry on a trans 
portation business. The directors are 

B. McLennan, G. M. Kinghorn, T. A. 
Crane, A. E. Ogilvie, E. Robertson and 
A. Kingman, all of Montreal, and B. M. 
Britton, Toronto. 

The Clyde Forks Lumber Co.'s mill at 
Clyde P'orks, on the Kingston and Pem- 
broke Railway, was burned last week, 
and a carload of stored hay was de 
stroyed. The cause of the fire is not 
known. The line structure was complete- 
ly destroyed. The loss is $10,000, with a 
small insurance. 

The Sangame Electric Co.. of Spring 
field, Ohio, will open a factory for the 
manufacture of electric meters in the 
White block, Windsor, Ont., about the 
middle of January. The factory will em- 
ploy about 15 men at first, but this num- 
ber will be increased as soon as the fa< 
ton is better equipped. 

A deputation of carriage manufacturers 
waited on the Government on Tuesday 
to ask that a minimum valuation be ap- 
plied to what are known as shop bug 
gies when imported into Canada, so as 
to prevent their coming in here at a 
nominal valuation to compete with the 
well-made product of Canadian factories. 

A London. Eng;., despatch says thai a 
company of prominent capitalists are 
sending experts to Canada to prospeel 
the country for water-power, with the 
object of utilizing it for electrical pur 
poses. One of the aims of the capitalists 
is to supply Toronto with water, as well 
us electricity. 



5] 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



USE OF CEMENT. 

ANEW YORK commercial paper, in a 
lengthy article, discusses the many 
uses by which cement is now put, 
and to the convenience and helpfulness of 
the building trades. 

Only a few years ago, it remarks, 
the use of concrete was confined to 
building foundations, vaults and struc- 
tural work of a primary character. The 
closing year witnesses such phenomenal 
achievements in the application of this 
manufactured product as to cause almost 
a revolution in many leading depart- 
ments of structural work, embracing high 
office buildings, dwellings, public works, 
municipal improvements, railroads, fac- 
tories, farming, submarine, mining, orna- 
mental and recreation ground construc- 
tion. 

Next to the exploitation of electricity 
there is perhaps no other field in which 
American genius has made such rapid 
strides during the closing year as in the 
new uses made of concrete and reinforced 
concrete cement for structural work. By 
reinforcing concrete with embedded steel 
rods, bars or wire rings this article has 
become almost indispensable in every 
component part of high buildings. In 
fact, the present year witnesses the com- 
pletion of skyscrapers made entirely of 
reinforced concrete, including girders, 
walls, floors, roofing, foundations and 
piling. 

A NEW USE FOR ALUMINUM. 

ALUMINUM has a new field of use- 
fulness, says The New York Tri- 
bune. The key to the function 
which aluminum performs in . metallurgy 
and engineering is found in the remark- 
able heat that is suddenly developed 
when it is burned. Combustion, it will 
be remembered, is simply the union of a 
given element with oxygen. When wood 
or coal is set on fire the carbon combines 
with that gas and produces carbonic 
oxide. Aluminum will not unite with at- 
mospheric oxygen, though. It is neces- 
sary to supply the element in a solid 
form. The oxide of some other metal 
furnishes this. If equal parts of alumi- 
num and the <>\iilc of iron, both pulver- 
ized and cold, arc placed in a crucible, 
and a tiny fuse of the right kind is ap- 
plied, a marvellous effect is produced. 
The receptacle becomes a furnace. By 
purely chemical means a temperature is 
induced which rivals that of the electric: 
arc. Within a minute or two the alumi- 
num steals the oxygen from the iron and 
the latter is melted. If, in advance, and 
with a view to further operations, the 
iron is charged with the proper amount 
of carbon or some other element, the 
product is a steel possessing qualities 
Mini Hdapt it to some special services. 



One highly practical operation made 
feasible by the process here described is 
the welding of rails on trolley roads. In 
order to employ both tlje main track and 
the third rail (if there be one) as elec- 
trical conductors, it is customary to be 
one of two things. Either a copper band 
is attached to the ends of adjacent rails 
at each joint, or a little molten iron is 
poured around the cold steel there. The 
latter operation, as formerly conducted, 
involved the tise of cumbrous and expen- 
sive apparatus. In Europe aluminum is 
now used to some extent instead. A 
small portable crucible, tapering to a 
point, is adjusted over the right spot, a 
mould is formed around the joint to be 
welded, the proper mixture is ignited and 
almost immediately a supply of liquid 
steel is ready to be run into place. So 
intense is the heat -of the latter that it 
dissolves part of the metal of which the 
rail is composed, and a joint of surpris- 
ing strength is created. Here, again, 
aluminum figures as a rival of copper, 
and it promises to make the old style of 
bond unnecessary. 

When one has once grasped the sim- 
plicity and effectiveness of the new pro- 
cess, as applied to electric railways, he 
will be quick to see how helpful it can 
be in repairing great castings or forgings 
like the sternpost or crankshaft of an 
ocean steamship. It will often happen 
that work of this kind can be performed 
at sea ; but, even if it is delayed until 
the end of a voyage, the necessity for 
going into a dry dock and a resort to 
the services of a forge can usually be 
avoided. • 



BUILDING NOTES. 

Keith & Fitzsimons, Toronto, are in- 
stalling plumbing and heating fixtures in 
the new plant of The International Har- 
vester Co., Hamilton. 

The contract for supplying The William 
Davies Co.'s new addition to their man- 
ufacturing plant, East Toronto, with 
automatic sprinklers has been given to 
Bennett & Wright. 

Chadwick & Beckett, architects, Toron- 
to, are getting ■ out plans for interior 
alterations in the premises of The Holmes 
Electric Protection Co., of Toronto, 5 
Jordan street. 

G. W. Gouinlock, architect, Toronto, is 
supervising the construction of the mag- 
nificent new Foresters' Orphans' Home 
building, now in course of erection at 
Foresters' Island Park, Deseronto. 



AN APPRECIATIVE SUBSCRIBER. 

Editor ' * Hardware and Metal " :—- 
Enclosed please find postal note, for 
which you may continue sending me 
your weekly instalment of " Hardware 
and Metal " diet. I have for the past 
dozen years or more been accustomed 
to receiving the above and I have al- 
ways found it a great helpmeet from 
the time of my apprenticeship in the 
hardware store to the present day, as 
travelling representative of a leading 
Montreal firm. 

S. E. WAFFLE, 
with Alex. McArthur & Co. 

Montreal, Jan. 4, 1904. 



APOLLO 

There is but one such galvan- 
ized iron. 

Return a whole sheet for an 
inch of fault. 

Quick service. 



American Sheet Steel Company, New York 

Representatives for Canada 

B. & S. H. Thompson & Company 

53 St. Sulpice Street 

Montreal 



52 



BUILDERS' AND CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 



Hardware and 

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Building Plans. 

The light problem is solved admirably and 
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and public buildings by 

The Ormsby Skylight 

By any test the best Skylight on the market. 
Write for particulars. 



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TORONTO, ONT. 



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LIMITED, t» 
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TORONTO. W 

Persons addressing advertisers will 
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Agents being placed in every district. 



Arrow Brand Asphalt Ready Roofing 

Easy to lay— lasts long— needs no painting, as it comes in rolls 
already surfaced with gravel. 

A. C. JENKINQ, Sole Selling Agents, 
Room 215 Coristine Building, - - MONTREAL. 




Will Hold Up a Shelf ! 

That's what a shelfibracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be Nothing Bet 
ter, Nothing Cheaper than the BRADLEY 
STEEL BRACKET. It is well Japanned. Strong 
and Light. The saving in freight is a good profit, 
aside from the lower price at which the goods are 
sold. Order direct or through your jobber. 

ATLAS MFC. CO., 

New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 



$2 



FOR THIS SMALL SUM THE 



$2 



MANUFACTURER >.4UPPL¥ MERCHANT 

may keep posted on new openings 
for trade. 

T5£ CANADIAN CONTRACT RECORD 

reports weekly all projected building and other 
. construction works throughout Canada as well 
as new business enterprises. 



Send your name and address with $2 for 
a year's subscription to 

Canadian Contract Record 

*2 TORONTO and MONTREAL OJ 



MADE I N ENGLAND 



V\fxCK 



SAW 



BMO£< 



CHAS. BAYNES 

KNUZDEN BROOK 

IB ILL ^ O IKI IB TT IR TSJ" 



THE "SUN" RRAND PORTLAND CEMENT. 

We make only one quality and that the best. 
Ask us for quotations. 

The Sun Portland Cement Co., Limited 

OWEN SOUND 

Jas. A. Cline, Managing Director. 

[he Hanover Portland Cement Co,, Limited 

HANOVER, ONTARIO. 

Saugeen Brand" 



Manufacturers of t « 
the Celebrated 



OF PORTLAND CEMENT. 



Prices on application. 



"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn ' 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 
Cables — Emlyn Engineering Works 

Machinery," Newport. Newport, Mon., England 



Gait Carpet Stretcher 

Away Ahead of All Others 

Simple, Effective. Will not tear the 
finest carpet. Will sell to every household 
on the score of price and utility. Profitable 
to dealer. 

SEND FOR BOOKLET. 

Grand River Metal Works 



Gait, 



Ont. 



> 

Limited 




ATKINS SS^cE SAWS 



ARE SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS IN MATERIAL, TEM- 
PER, WORKMANSHIP, FINISH and CUTTING QUALITIES. 
OUR VICTOR, TUTTLE TOOTH AND SEGMENT GROUND SAWS ARE THE FAVORITES IN THE CAMPS 




'^ffimWr$ 



E. C. ATKINS & CO., 



Leading Manufacturers ok HIGH-GRADE, CROSS-CUT, HAND, BAND, 

CIRCULAR, HACK, BACK, WOOD and SMALL SAWS of all kinds 
INCORPORATED. 

Factories and Home Office : INDIANAPOLIS, IND., U.S.A. Write for Catalogue and Prices 

H. P. HUBBARD, Sales Agent for Canada. Toronto Office ; 30 Front St. East. Tel. Main 1896. 



53 



Hardware and 
Metal 



THE OFFICE 





FORD & 

| FEATHERSTONE 

Importers and dealers in 

FIREPROOF SAFES, 
STEEL BANK SAFES, 
VAULTS, TIME LOCKS, 
DEPOSIT BOXES. 

Combination locks put on and 
combinations changed. Safes 
repaired, etc. 

10 John St. N., Hamilton, Ont. 


^Jmmmmmm 


:, 


: <£ary Stiff Co. 

• 

h i 

L. i 






The Hallwood 



No apologies go with the HALLWOOD, It has 
wrestled with giants and was never overthrown. 
It does every good thing any other make of registers 
will do, and a few good things no other cash 
register will do. And it has cut out weaknesses 
and nonsense. 



The strength of the HALLWOOD claims are 
based on its perfection, simplicity and price. It wins 
on every point. 



Our representative is eager to show you a 
HALLWOOD. Don't buy too soon. 



THE 



Hallwood CasI Register Co. of CaMa 

78-80 King St. E., - TORONTO. 



Special Advertising Rates have been arranged for space 

in " The Office," and will be gladly 

quoted on request. 



PRINTING 

1.000 Envelopes, good white paper, - - - >pl.00 

1.000 Letter Heads, Note size, $1.00 

1,000 Letter Heads, Letter size, .... $2.50 

1,000 Statements, .-.-"---. $1.50 

1,000 Bill Heads. S1.50 

1,000 Dodgers, ........ gi.25 

.Send for Samples. 

G. A. Wecse & Son, 44 Yonge St., Toronto. 




I 



ISEW TELEPHONE LOSE 

A new copper metallic line has just been completed from 
Simcoe to Port Rowan. The towns listed below can now be 
reached from Toronto at the following rates : 



PORT ROWAN 
ST. WILLIAMS 
VITTORIA 



50c. 
50c. 

40c. 



The Bell Telephone Co. of Canada 



i 

i 
i 




TENGWALL 
TIME SAVERS 



TENGWALL and OPALLA LOOSE LEAF LEDGERS 



LOOSE LEAF BINDERS FOR ALL KINDS OF 
LOOSE LEAF SYSTEMS. 

SEND FOR COMPLETE NEW CATALOQUE. 



HART & RIDDELL 



Manufacturing 
Stationers . . . 

40 Wellington St. 
TORONTO. 



East 




7¥S our agents have a large territory to cover 
J\ and consequently cannot call upon you as 
often as we should desire, we should be pleased 
to hear from you that we may assist you in 
every way in the use of our systems in your 
business. 

Have you seen our Account rendering 
system ? It tells you at a glance the total 
amount of accounts rendered, paid, and balance 
due for each and every account for each month 
and for the year. Can be used in connection 
with Briggs' Ledger No. 1 or 2. 

Write us for further particulars. 

The Briggs Ledger System Co., 

Limited 

?5 Vork St., - Toronto, Can. 



Hard-ware and 

Metal 




DEBTORS WHO ARE SLOW BUT GOOD. 



E 



By J. J. Rutka. 

ACH individual ease usually requires different 
and separate treatments. We have on our 
books a few just such accounts, good but slow 
pay. In most cases we find that writing per- 
sonal letters from time to time to the head of 
the firm of such an institution, and setting a definite 
amount which we want him to send at a stipulated time 
has the best results. As far as possible a personal inter- 
view is desirable. We find people of that kind frequently 
pay promptly in certain directions, while they let other 
accounts run along. This is often done, as we have dis- 
covered, in this way: A firm will pay the man who pre- 
sents the best ease, before they will pay the man that 
uses ordinary methods. We have a case of that kind on 
hand just now. A firm owed us an account. They are 
good for ten times the amount they owed. They did not 
pay us, because they claim we did not need the money 
as badly as some one else whom they owed. A personal 
interview, however, has resulted in making an arrange- 
ment with these people, whereby they have paid us a part 
immediately, and a stipulated amount every two 
weeks thereafter, so the amount is paid up, and it was 
done with the best of feelings on both sides, and they con- 
timie to send us their orders daily. We find that by add- 
ing interest to overdue accounts frequently helps the 
case. 

We have found that coaxing letters, in most cases, 
are the best, and next to a personal interview, the most 
effective. In most cases we have pleaded that we were 
very hard up, and needed the money, and that has had 
its effect. We rarely ever find that a demand accompan- 
ied by a threat has ever done any good. It may help to 
collect an account, but it loses you a customer sure. Still 
there is now and then a cese where even a lawsuit has to 
be resorted to. We have also found that where a cus- 
tomer was good but slow pay that by holding up his 
orders, and writing him that, until he paid the old bills, 
his new orders would not be filled, has in some cases a 
good effect. You see, therefore, that there is no rigid or 
regular set form which can be followed in a cese of that 
kind. 

We have a customer whom we consider good that will 
never pay a bill until the same is handed to a collector, 
or a justice of the peace, nor will he buy any goods after 
the account has been running sixty days until such an 
action is taken. This man will come to town regularly 
on receiving a notice from the collector, and pay his bill, 
and on the same day present the receipt at our office and 
buy more goods. We have repeatedly told him that we 
would not sell him goods at as close a price as if he 
paid in regular time, but it seemed to make little or no 
difference to him. . 

In this connection I wish to say that we have some 
customers who take extraordinarily long time, but are 
perfectly good, to whom we have written that if they con- 
tinued to take such extra long time we would have to 
charge them more for their goods; and in making the in- 
voice we add 5 per cent, to the net amount of the in- 
voice, and write them with the invoice, saying, if paid 



in sixty days they can deduct the extra charge; if paid 
in ten days they can deduct the cash discount in addi- 
tion to such deduction; but if the account runs more than 
sixty days the total charge will stand. We have found 
this method very beneficial in some cases. This method, 
however, has to be used with caution, as it will not work 
with everybody. 

1 find, however, that the coaxing method is perhaps 
the very best one in ninety-nine cases out of one hundred. 



USEFUL AUDITING DEVICE. 

IN many large business houses it is now the custom, ac- 
cording to The Bookkeeper, to send out at regular 
intervals a notice similar to that appended, the ob- 
ject being to compare the ledger balances with those ap- 
pearing on the books of the customers. It will be noted 
that a special stamped envelope is enclosed for the reply, 
which is usually directed to the business address of the 
accountant who has the audit in charge. 

Your debit balances on the books of this Com- 
pany 190.. is $ Kind- 
ly compare this with your books, and state below 
whether it agrees or not. If any difference should 
exist please stale amount of difference and, if possi- 
ble, the items making same. 

This is sent not as a dun, but for the purpose 
of enabling us to verify our accounts and check up 
our books correctly. Please reply on form below, 
and return this sheet in stamped envelope enclosed. 

Your credit since above date are as follows : 
Gentlemen : 

Balance as shown above $ is 

not correct. 



Signed. 



.190. . 



A SIMPLE SUM IN ARITHMETIC. 

SUPPOSE, says World's Work, a big company is or- 
ganized and issties bonds and stocks on the fol- 
lowing basis : 

The percentage of 
Things capitalized stocks and bonds 

represented by them 

Real value 25 

Pure water j 

Promoters' shares 10 

Increase over real value because of " flush " times 15 

Now, what happens when the fabric of speculation is 
shaken? The 15 per cent, of "flush-times" valuation 
fades away; the 10 per cent, of promoters' profit shares 
are remembered and the public resents such a distribution 
of them; people begin to ask how much pure water went 
to the making of the whole organization — they recall 
everything, in fact, except the real value. The stock, 
therefore, that is really worth 25 per cent, of its par 
value, if honest management be assumed, falls far below 
25 cents in the market. 

This very elementary and simple " sum " in arithme- 
tic, explains many " mysterious " things that have been 
happening in the stock market. Nothing is so hard to 
manage as a suspicious public; but whose fault is it that 
the public became suspicious? 

Speculation runs away with industry for a time, but 
industry gets its revenge at last. 



55 



fiardware and 
Metal 



THE OFFICE 



THE MANAGER AND HIS MEN. 

A MANAGER must know his men through and through ' ' 
remarks a writer in a contemporary. " He must 
recognize their strengths and weaknesses, and act 
accordingly ; one man may be extremely sensitive, another 
too conservative, another too susceptible to flattery and 
easily influenced. 

' ' Another too free a buyer, another may be entirely in- 
capable of appreciating figures, and so on, but each may 
be otherwise excellent. To get the best out of these men 
these special points of character must be considered. 

' ' And then the development of these, the making of in- 
telligent, thinking men and women out of inexperenced 
and immature lads and young women; the studying of the 
peculiar qualifications of each, and the placing of that 
one so that the peculair trait will couut to his advantage 
and to that of the house; to encourage the eax'nest young 
woman who needs encouragement just at that moment, 
to bring down to the earth that young man who has been 
spoiled at home, and like poor Hetty in Adam Bede, of 
■whom Mrs. Poyser said, ' She is like the cock who thinks 
the sun rises to hear him crow,' to watch the hundreds 
of points and factors in management of men, is but part 
of the duty of each who is in charge of a large business. 

' ' Then this same man must be an expert on figures and 
percentage, for after all a large business must in its 
figures depend almost entirely upon percentage. He must 
be able to look many ways at once, and must in a way 
keep in touch with the commercial news of the country in 
his spectral line. He must be broad, not narrow; quick, 
not slow; thoughtful, not impulsive; energetic, not ment- 
ally or physically lazy; conservative to that fine point of 
correctness, not hysterical; bold, not timid; agreeable 
and tactful, not antagonistic; approachable, not repell- 
ing; just, never unjust. 

' ' He must be possessed of good common sense, good 
judgment, in order to hold the respect of those with 
whom he is constaly advising. If, for example, he is man- 
ager of merchandise, he must be a judge of merchandise 
and values, and must be a natural trader. If in charge 
of employes, he must be a quick judge of human nature 
and possess an ability to discover the qualities of each 
one's mental and physical self. If in charge of systems, 
an inventive mind is necessary, but with it is necessary 
also a practical mind, and one which quickly separates 
the good ideas from the faulty ones. 

" To those who conduct the business as a whole comes 
the necessity of selecting a set of men, who, when se- 
lected, should really form a cabinet with whom to ad- 
vise daily, hourly, concerning matters of moment. Then 
the chiefs of the business must frame a policy, a line of 
action, just as do the owners of a ship decide on her 
course and final harbor, and as the captain of the ship 
must direct the man at the wheel and guide her past the 
many dangers of the sea, so those who are responsible for 
the conduct of a business must push that business with 
greatest speed, but must watch its daily course, and must 
avoid sunken reefs and derelicts, must go slowly during 
the foggy times, and keep it steady when the storms 
threaten. 

" A merchandising business is pre-eminently a business 
of infinite detail, and that man, no. matter how capable 
and how energetic he may be, who undertakes to do it all 
alone will limit that business, just as every man's day is 
limited in the number of its minutes. The biggest man is 



the man who can most easily utilize the ability of others: 
so that retail business is best conducted, which can pro- 
fitably unite to itself the greatest number of thinking, 
intelligent, active men and women, each one being, not a 
cog in the machinery, but an independent, self-confident 
unit, a member of the organization, a loyal and enthus- 
iastic worker whose daily results bring respect and recog- 
nition. To obtain this, is a profession, science, or an 
art." 

STOCKTAKING. 

BETTER late than never " is good advice as to 
stocktaking, as it is concerning many other 
■^ things, remarks a contemporary. 

A tradesman cannot tell his exact Avorth from his 
ledger, because he does not know what quantity of stock 
he has in his store. To know this it is necessary, per- 
iodically, to take stock or prepare a balance-sheet. 

A balance-sheet is a condensed statement of the mer- 
chant's assets and liabilities, made out to show how his 
affairs stand, and what amount of money he has made 
since he began business or since the previous inventory. 

His assets are the balances or moneys owing to him 
found on the debtor side of the accounts in the ledger— 
the amount of cash he has in hand, the stock in the shop, 
the value of the goodwill and the fixtures, etc. 

His liabilities are the balances or moneys owing by 
him found on the credit side of the accounts in the ledger. 
The difference between the assets and the liabilities is the 
amount of money he is worth. 

I preparing a balance sheet the first thing to do is to 
dnter in a book kept for the purpose all goods in the 
store, and all goods lying to order of which the invoices 
have been received. The net cost price of every article 
should be put down, and the amounts carried out and 
added up, and the amount entered on the left-hand side 
of the balance-sheet as " stock." 

The accounts owing by customers, which are found on 
the debtor side of their ledger accounts, are then added 
up, and the discounts, if any, deducted, and the net total 
entered on the same side of the balance-sheet as " book 
debts." The cash in hand should then be counted, and 
the amount entered on the same side of the balance-sheet 
as " cash on hand." 

The value of the good-will and fixtures should then 
be put down. It is best to deduct from the value of the 
fixtures at the rate of 10 per cent, per annum at each 
successive stocktaking, so that at the end of ten years the 
fixtures will not be put down at all, as they will be worn 
out and have become worthless. If the tradesman has a 
banking account he puts down the amount of the balance 
in his favor on the same side of the balance-sheet. If he 
has money invested in property or any other securities, 
the amounts are also put down. All the above are called 
his assets. 

On the other side of the balance-sheet he puts down 
his liabilities, which are the sum total of the amounts 
owing by him found on the creditor side of the ledger, 
and any other moneys he may owe. Both columns are 
then added up, and the difference of the accounts is what 
he is worth. 

By this means a tradesman can tell exactly what 
amount of money he has gained in a given period. Some 
authorities urge that stocktaking should be done every 
three months, but there are other houses that are satis- 
fied with a half-yearly inventory, although many firms 
take inventory only once a year. The oftener the better, 
for it checks stealing and other leaks. 



56 



THE OFFICE 



Hardware rind 
Metal 



This list is for the purpose of placing retailers, 
manufacturers' jobbers and other readers in 
touch with reliable and competent accountants 
and auditors whose services are so frequently 
required for suoh purposes as opening books, 



Leading Canadian 
Accountants and Auditors 



adjusting and auditing accounts, arranging part- 
nerships or organizing joint stock companies, 
devising special office systems, making collec- 
tions and investigations, handling estates, mak- 
ing valuations, etc. 



DAVID HOSKINS, F.C.A. 
Chartered Accountant, 
Auditor, 

Financial Valuator. 
207 Manning Chambers, City Hall Sq., 
Toronto, Canada. 



F. H. KIDD, 

Chartered Accountant, Auditor, 

Assignee, Etc. 

Room 50, 77 York St., Toronto. 



JENKINS & HARDY, 
Assignees, Chartered Accountants, 
Estate and Fire Insurance Agents. 

15}£ Toronto Street. Toronto. 

465 Temple Building, Montreal. 

100 William Street, New York. 



HENRY BARBER & CO., 

Accountants and Assignees. 

Offices : 

18 Wellington St. E., Toronto, Ont. 

WILLIAM FAHEY, 

Accountant and Auditor. 

402 McKinnon Building, Toronto. 



GEO. O. MERSON, 

Chartered Accountant, 

Trustee, Assignee, Liquidator, 

Auditor, Etc. 

27 Wellington St. E., 

'Phone Main 4744. Toronto. 



Cable Address : "Wigwam." 
T. G. WILLIAMSON, 
Chartered Accountant and Auditor, 
15 Toronto St., Toronto, Canada. 



This space f 15 a year. 



This space $15 a year. 



ThiB space $15 a year. 



This list is for the purpose of placing manufac- 
turers, wholesale and retail merchants and other 
readers throughout Canada, and Arms abroad 
doing business in Canada, in touch with the 
legal profession throughout the Dominion, for 
the collection of accounts, legal representation, 



LEGAL CARDS. 



organization of companies, the arrangement or 
dissolution of partnerships, or assignments, as 
well as all other matters of a legal nature. 

For advertising rates apply to MacLean Pub- 
lishing Co., Limited, Montreal or Toronto. 



BEATTY, BLACKSTOCK, FASKEN 

& RIDDELL, 
BEATTY, BLACKSTOCK, CHAD- 
WICK & GALT, 
Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, Etc. 

Offices, Bank of Toronto, 
Tel., Main 3813. Toronto, Ont. 



JAS. H. BURBITT, K.C. 

Solicitor, Notary, Etc. 

Pembroke, - - Ont. 



D. O. CAMERON, Barrister. 

Equity Chambers, Toronto. 

Branch Office, Oakville, Ont. 



1. L. O. VIDAL. 
Barrister, Solicitor, etc. Collections 

and Commercial Law. 
Moutmagny and Quebec City, Que. 

TUPPER, PHIPPEN & TUPPER, 

Barristers, Solicitors, Etc. 

Winnipeg, - - Canada. 



J. C. HAMILTON. LL.B., 

Barrister, Solicitor and Notary. 

McKinnon Building, Toronlo. 

•Phone, Main 65. 

ATWATER, DUCLOS & CHATJVIN. 

Advocates. Montreal. 
Albert W. Atwater, Q. C, Consulting 
Counsel for City of Montreal. Chas. 
A. Duclos. Henry N. Chauvin. 



•»-* | . i -w-^ The following institutions for the education 

I 1 , QUCatlOnal ±J COart HI Cllt. of business men ' s sons and daughters are 

* recommended by this paper : 


EXPERT BOOKKEEPERS. 

Every bookkeeper should be a Chartered 
Accountant. The degree of C. A. is recog- 
nized by the business community of America. 
Examinations are not beyond the reach of 
of any industrious bookkeeper who is anxious 
to qualify for the highest positions in his 
profession. 

ASK FOR PARTICULARS. 

Canadian Correspondence Collep, Limited, 

42-46 King St. W., - TORONTO, ONT. 


Western Business College 

Cor. College and TftPftNTO 

Spadina avenue, ■ VfixV/l^i 1 \Jm 

Thorough courses in Bookkeeping, Stenography, Typewriting 
and Penmanship ; individual instruction. 

A. J. HOARE, Principal. 


St. Margaret's College, Toronto 

A Boarding and Day School for Girls. 
Thorough courses in every departmeut. 
Only teachers of the highest academical and professional standing employed. 

GEORGE DICKSON, M.A., « MRS. GEORGE DICKSON 

Director. Lady Principal. 


X~^"^^^ L-£_Z_^ Bookkeeping and Shorthand are 
^TY7j, //l X?S/4 sTs^ZsT'' sure stepping-stones t0 success. 
\^\yc££///(4'&' y l^S£ / W> Teachers who have had practical 
^^^_ t SfiT ^~^ business experience teach these 

branches in 

THE WILLIS BUSINESS COLLEGE. 

A school of genuine merit. Send for our beautiful catalogue. 
S. T. Willis, Principal, Cor. Bank and Albert Sts., OTTAWA. 


The Belleville Business College, 

Limited. 
BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO. 

Send for handsome catalogue 1 p r :»u Uff*,-, MA Prinriml 

describing fully all courses J> rnin 'criers, m.ft., principal 



PAGE METAL GATE'S 



203 



3 feet vide, 4 feet high, including hinges and latch $2.75 

10 feet wide, 4 feet high, including hinges and latch 5.75 

Other sizes in proportion. m 

THE PAGE WIRE FENCE CO. Limited, - Walkerville, Montreal, Winnipeg, St. John 



Supplied 
by us or 
local dealer. 



57 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



IMITATION THE SINCEREST FLATTERY 





/* 



H. BOKER & CO. were the FIRST to produce Razors with galvanic-gold etching in the hollow. The "KING CUTTER" 

was the first of this kind ever offered, and the brand and design of etching were duly registered at Ottawa. 

he Quality being UNSURPASSED, almost every maker doing business in Canada, has copied the galvanic-gold etching as 

well as the design, as near as the laws will allow, but, the "KING CUTTER" leads and no maker can come near the same 

quality and workmanship. 

i FOR SALE BY LEADING WHOLESALE !FIRMS 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



January 15. 1904. 

These prices are for such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

TIN. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits-- 

56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. -1r30 oO 4?1 oO 
TINPLATES. 
Charcoal Plates— Bright. 
M.L.S., equal to Bradley Per box. 

1 C, usual sizes %w 

ixx !: '■'■'• * 50 

Famous, equal to Bradley— 

J Q '* * ? 

1XK ...» ft 

Raven and Vulture Grades- 

I C, usual sizes - ? j™ 

tv " n 5U 

{ 5 v .. 6 50 

I XXX " 7 5° 

"Dominion Crown Best" Double 

Coated, Tissued. p el . box. 

.,, 5 50 

IX. '.'.'.'.'.'.'.".'.'.'■■'•■■ 6 50 

iVv 750 

"Allaways Best" Standard Quality. 

ix 5 5° 

ixx.!!! •■■• 6 50 

Coke Plates— Bright. 
Bessemer Steel T 

I.C.. usual size, 14x20 3 65 

I.C., special sizes, base t «" 

20x28 ' n 

Charcoal Plates— Terne. 
Dean or J. G. Grade- 

I C., 20x28, 112 sheets .... b 75 7 oO 

IX., Terne Tin 10 M 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X X, 14x56, 50 sheet bxs. } 
" 14x60, " f ■■•■ 7 00 

" 14x65, " J 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 7 50 

• • « 26 8 w 

IRON AND STEEL. 

Common bar, per 100 lb 2 00 

Refined " „ { *" 

HorseBhoe Iron £ *" 

Hoop steel, U to 3-in. base I MO 

SSMr.^. :: **> jg 

S^ste^:.;:.!!:::.. gif. 8 

T Firth&Co. stool steel, per lb 12, 13 

Jessop's tool steel ■ ■ • • OH 

Mortons toolsteel.... .,.,...••■ 121 13 
Black Diamond and B.C. 

tool steel ......... 10 11 

Chas. Leonard's too see ... . 008 09 

Jonas & Colver's tool steel, . . 10 20 

"Air Hardening .... 70 

Drill steel, per lb 08 10 

Russia Iron— . . 

Genuine.... " ' ' 

Imitation Doni. Drown Ob 

STEEL BOILER PLATE. 

, . , 2 50 2 60 

t 1". :,,' 2 60 2 70 

|in "ndthKter . S30 2 60 



BABBIT METAL. 

" Tandem," A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

C " Hi 

Frictiouless Metal " 23 

Syracuse Smelting Works : 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Government, " 44 

Tough, " 40 

Hard, " 40 

Dynamo 30 

Special 25 

Harmony 22 

Car Box 20 

Extra 15 

The Canada Metal Co. : 

Imperial, genuine, 40 

Metallic 30 

Hercules 20 

Star 15 

No. 1 12 

No. 2 10 

No. 3 06 

No. 4 05 

Geo. Langwell i Son 

No. 1 , 08 

No. 2 07 

No. 3 051 

Extra 091 

BLACK SHEETS. 

Montreal. Toronto 

10 and 16 gauge 2 25 2 55 

18 gauge 2 30 2 60 

20 " 2 30 2 60 

22 to 24 gauge 2 35 2 70 

26 " 2 40 2 80 

28 2 40 2 90 

COPPER WIRE. 
Discount, 50 per cent. 

CANADA PLATES. 

Ordinary 2 65 

AU bright 3 50 

Galvanized Canada Plates- 
Ordinary Dom. 
Crown. 

18x24x52 4 25 4 35 

" 60 4 50 4 60 

20x28x80 8 50 8 70 

" 94 9 00 9 20 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. Queen's 
Fleur-de-Lis. Comet Bell. Head 

16 gauge 3 65 ., 

18 to 24 gauge . . 3 75 3 75 3 75 4 05 

26 " .. 4 00 4 00 3 90 4 25 

28 " .. 4 25 4 25 4 05 4 50 

American brands, $4 .40 for 28 gauge. 

Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 

CHAIN. 

Proof coil, 3-16 in., per 100 lb 

} " 6 10 

5-16 " 4 70 

I " 4 00 

7-16 " 3 80 

1 " 3 70 

9-16 " 3 55 

8 " 3 35 

J " 3 30 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, discount 

35 p.c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

COPPER. 

Ingot. Per 100 lb. 

Casting 13 50 14 00 

Bars. 
Cut lengths, round, 1 to J in. . 23 00 ^5 00 
" round and square, 

1 to 2 inches.... 23 00 25 00 



Sheet. 

Plain, 16 oz., 14x48 and 14x60 .... 20 00 

Plain, 14 oz 21 00 

Tinned copper sheet 24 00 

Planished 32 00 

Braziers' (in sheets). 

4x6 ft., 25 to 30 lb. each, per lb 22 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 21 

" 50-lb. and above " .... 20 

BOILER AND T.K. PITTS. 

Plain tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 

BRASS. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 23 

Tubing, base, per lb 231 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 6 00 6 25 

Domestic " " 

ZINC SHEET. 

5-ewt. casks 6 15 6 50 

Part casks 6 50 7 Oil 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 3 20 3 30 

Bar.perlb 05 

Sheets, 21 lb. sq. ft., by roll 06} 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 06 

Note.— Cut sheets lc. per lb., extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists at 7c. 
per lb. and 35 p.c lis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths, lists at 8c. 

ANTIMONY. 

Cookson's per lb. 7 50 8 0J 

SHOT. 

Common, $6.50 per 100 lb.; chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 171 pc. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms, 3 p.c. cash, freights equalized. 

PLUMBING GOODS. 

BATH tubs. 

Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 20 per cent, off revised list. 

BATHS. 

Standard Enameled. 

oi-ft. rolled rim, 1st quality 23 00 

5J 2nd " 20 00 

closets. Net. 

Plain York or Ontario Sypnon Jet. . . $9 60 

Emb. " " " ... 10 20 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Simplex Syphon Jet 4) 00 

Emb. " " " ..7 50 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic, plain . . 6 00 

Low " " emb. .. 6 50 

Plain Richelieu 4 25 

Emb. " 4 50 

Connections 1 25 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins, P.O., 14-in 63 

Basins, oval, 17 x 14-in 1 50 

Basins, " 19 x 15-in 2 Oo 

IRON PIPE. 
Black pipe— Per 100 feet. 

' inch 3 25 

| " 2 30 2 3C 

l " 2 55 2 55 

• " 2 85 2 85 

3 " 3 65 3 65 

1 " 5 20 

1} " 735 

lj " 8 95 

2 " A 12 55 

21 " 19 25 

3" " 22 75 

31 " 28 75 

4 " 35 25 

4i. " 41 00 

5" " 44 00 

6 " 57 50 

58 



Galvanized pipe — 

> '"eh 3 2H 

f ' T45 

\ , 3 90 

S „ 5 00 

J, „ 720 

}} „ 10 05 

H „ 12 20 

Malleable Fittings— Discount 15 p.c. 
Cast Iron Fittings— 

On unions, 55 per cent. ; on nipples, 60 per 
cent.; headers and Hanged unions, 525 per 
cent.: bushings, plugs and other than stand- 
ard 571 per cent. 

PLUMBERS* BRASS GOODS. 

Standard Compression work, dis. 60 per cent 
Cushion work, discount 50 per cent 
Fuller work, discount 65 per cent. 

6 dozen lots and over of the above, extra dis- 
count 10 per cent. 

Lever handle Stops and Waste, discount 60 

per cent. With, in lots of 2 dozen and over 

an extra discount of 10 per cent 
Globe, Angle und Cheek Valves, diseoimt 

55 per cent. 
Standard Globe, Angle and Check Valves 

discount 60 per cent. 
J. M. T. Radiator Valves discount 55 per cent 
Standard Radiator Valves, discount 60 per 

cent. 
Patent Quick -Opening Valves, discount 65 

per cent. 

No. 1 compression bath cOck net 1 75 

No. 4 " " " 2 00 

No. 7 Fuller's " 2 20 

No. 4}, " " 2 35 - 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

cock, hot and cold per doz. 15 06 

Patent Compression Cushion, bath 

cock, No. 2208 2 25 

Square head brass cocks, discount 55 percent 

" iron " " 50 to 60 " 

Competition Globe, Angle and Check Valve 

discount 65 per cent. 
Thompson Smoke-test Machine $25.00 

RANOE BOILERS. 

Dominion, 30 gallon net 5 50 

35 " " 6 50 

„ , , 40 " " 7 50 

Ronald s Galvanized, 30 gallon, " 7 40 

35 " " 8 40 

„ 40 " " 9 60 

Copper, 30 gallon " 22 00 

35 " " 24 OP 

" 40 " " 28 

Discount off copper boilers 15 per cent. 
SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS. 
Light soil pipe, discount, 45 and 5 per cent. 
" fittings, discount 50 and 5 p.c. 
Med. and Extra heavy pipe and fittings, dis. 55 
and 5 per cent. 

7 and 8-in. pipe, discount 40 and 5 per cent. 

SOLDER. Per lb 

Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 19 

Bar, half-and-half, commercial 18 

Refined 18 

Wiping 17 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

BLUESTONE. 

Casks, for sDraying, "so 

100-lb. lots do per lb 08 

COLORS IN OIL. 
25-lb. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian red, per lb 031 05 

Chrome yellow 12 14 

Golden ochre 07 10 

French " 06 

Marine black 04 

Chrome green o 10 

French Imperial green 14 

Signwriters' black 16 

Umber 04 06 

Sienna 04 07 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



I 



; 



Joseph Rodgers & Sons 

Limited 
SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. 

Each blade of our Goods bears the 
exact mark here represented. 



JAMES HUTTON & CO.. MONTREAL 



SOLE AGENTS 

IN CANADA. 




COLORS, DRY. 

Common ochre, bbls 1 15 1 30 

Yellow ochre (J.F.L.S) bbls 2 00 

Brussels ochre 2 00 

Venetian red, bbl 1 50 2 25 

English oxides, per cwt 3 00 3 25V3 

American oxides, bbls 1 25 2 75X 

Canadian oxides, bbls 1 25 1 75 

Super magnetic oxides, 93 p. c. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" umber, " " 08 10 

Raw umber 08 10 

Drop black, pure 10 

Chrome yellow, pure 18 

Chrome greens, pure per lb 09 10 

Golden ochre 03 04 

Ultramarine blue, in 28-lb. 

boxes, per lb 06 12 

Fire proof mineral, per 100 lb 1 00 

Genunie Eng. Litharge, per lb 07 

Mortar color, per 100 lb 1 25 IS 

Pure Indian red, No. 45, lb. . . 08 1 J 

Whiting (common), bbl 55 8 VO 

English vermilion in 30-lb. bgs. ... 85 

CASTOR OIL. 

British, 1st. qual.in cases.per lb 084 094 

" small lots .... 10 10J 

COD OIL, ETC. 

Cod oil, per gal 50 55 

Pure olive 1 40 

" neatsfoot : 90 

WHITE LEAD. Per 100 lb. 

Pure 4 75 

No. 1 4 50 

No. 2 4 25 

No. 3 3 87J 

No. 4 350 

Munro's Select Flake White 4 75 

Elephant and Decorators'Pure 4 75 

Decorator's Pure 4 75 

Sterling Pure 5 00 

Island City Pure 5 00 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 4 75 5 00 

Ramsay's Exterior 4 50 4 75 

RED LEAD 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt t$4 25 ?4 50 

Genuine. 100 lb. kegs, " 4 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 4 00 

No. I, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 4 25 

WHITE ZINC. 

Extra Red Seal 06 08 

French V. M 06 061 

Lehigh 06 Ofj 

DRY WHITE LEAD. 

Pure, casks 4 50 

Pure, kegs 4 75 

No. 1, casks 4 25 

No. 1, kegs 4 50 

PREPARED PAINTS. 

In }, J and 1-gallon tins. 



Pure, per gallon 

Second qualities, per gallon . . 

Barn (in bbls.) 60 

The Sherwin-Williams paints 

Canada Paint Co.'s pure 

Toronto Lead & Color Cos pure 
Sanderson Pearcy's pure .... 
Standard Co.'s " New Era.". . 

" Globe " barn 

Francis-Frost Co. s "Ark" B'd 

" British Navy deck 
Henderson & I'otts's "Anchor" 

Globe Paint Co.'s mixed 

barn and bridge 
Ramsay's paints, Pure, per gal. 
Thistle, " 
Outside, bbls 55 
Island City House Paint 

'' Floor ' .... 

Sterling House Paint 

Floor " 

National 



1 20 
1 00 
090 
1 40 
1 25 
1 25 
1 20 
1 30 
70 
1 25 
1 50 
1 35 
1 30 

75 

1 20 
1 00 

65 

1 25 
1 25 
1 20 
1 10 
1 05 



PUTTY. 

Bulk in bbls 2 05 

Bulk in less quantity 2 25 

Bladders in bbls 2 2f 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose 2 40 

25-lb. tins 2 25 

124 lb. tins 2 50 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 100 lb. 2 50 

VARNISHES. 

In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. Net. 

Carriage, No. 1 1 50 1 60 

Pale durable body 4 10 4 25 

rubbing 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, japan 1 50 1 60 

N o. 1 brown japan 085 090 

Elastic oak 1 50 

Furniture, extra 1 10 1 25 

No. 1 90 100 

Hard oil finish I 35 1 50 

Light oil finish 160 170 

Damar 175 2 00 

Shellac, white 2 40 2 50 

orange 2 30 2 40 

Turpentine, brown japan 1 10 1 20 

black japan 1 10 1 20 

" No. 1. 85 90 

Elastilite varnish, 1 gal. can, each. . 2 00 

Granitine floor finish, per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels; size 1, ^1.20; 

size 2, 70c; size 3, 40c. each. 
Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish, assorted 
case, from to 1 gal., #2.50 

OLUE. 

Common 08 084 

French medal 10 14 

White, extra 18 22 

Gelatine 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 

Ground 12 16 

Cologne, genuine 



HARDWARE. 

AMMUNITION. 
Cartridges. 

B. B. Caps Dominion, 50 and 5 per cent. 

Rim Fire Pistol, disccunt 40 p.c, American. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dominion, 50 and 5 p.c. 

Central Fire Pistol ard Rifle, 10 p.c, Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Domin- 
ion, 30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartrids es, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dominion, 15 per cent. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer- 
ican, add 5 per cent, to lUt. B.B. Caps, 
discount 40 per cent., American. 

Loaded and empty f-hella, "Trap" and 
" Dominion " grades, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 per cent, advance on list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 per cent.; American, $1.60 

Wads. per lb. 

Best thicK white felt wadding, in }- 

bags $ 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

i-lb. bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 035 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge P 25 

Fhin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

Q ach. 8 auge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each — Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7 and 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 " 1 65 

5 and 6 " 1 90 

•VJ 



ADZES. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

ANVILS. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 10J 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 091 

Brook's, 80-lb. and over 11 J 

AUGERS. 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 per cent, off list. 

AXES. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 7 00 10 00 

Double bit, " 10 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes 6 25 7 00 

Splitting Axes 7 00 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 50 10 00 

AMERICAN AXE AND TOOL CO. 

Red Ridge, boys', handled 5 75 

hunters 5 25 

AXLE GREASE 

Ordinary, per gross 5 7a 6 00 

Best quality 13 00 15 00 

BELLS. 

Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

Cow. 
American make, discount 631 per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 

Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 46 per cent. 

Farm. 
American, each 1 25 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

BELLOWS. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount '0 Der cent 

BELTING. 
Extra, 60 per cent. 
Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 
No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 per 

cent. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 per cent. 

BITS. 

Auger. 
Gilmour s, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford. discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings Gen., net list. 

Car. 
Gilmour's, 474 to 50 per cent. 
Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BLIND AND BED STAPLES. 

All sizes, per lb 073 12 

bolts and nuts Per cent. 

Carriage Bolts, common (SI list) 

" 3-16 and} 60 

" 3-16 and f 55 and 5 

" " 7-16 and up 55 

" full sq.(S2. 40 list) 60 
" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 60 

Machine Bolts, all sizes, g and 

less 60 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up 55 and 5 

Plough Bolts 55 and 5 

Blank Bolts 55 and 5 

Bolt Ends 55 and 5 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 70 

Coach Screws, cone point 70 

Nuts, square, ail sizes, 4c. per lb. off. 

Nuts, hexagon, ail sizes, 4Jc. per lb. off. 
Stove Rods, per lb., 5 J to 6c. 

BOOT CALKS. 

Small and medium, ball per M. 4 25 

Small heel " 4 50 



BROILERS. 

Light, discount 65 to 674 per cent. 
Reversible, discount 65 to 674 per cent . 
Vegetable, per doz., discount 374 per cent. 

Henis, No. 8 per doz 6 00 

Henis, No. 9 " .... 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 

BUTCHERS CLEAVERS. 

German per doz. 6 00 1100 

American " 12 00 20 00 

BUTCHER KNIVES 

Baileys per doz. 60 6 30 

BUILDING PAPER, ETC. 

Tarred Felt, per 100 lb l S5 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 1L. 

per roll <i 90 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 65 lb., 

per roll i 13 

,Carpet Felt per ton 45 00 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 35 00 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 40 

Tar " " 400 " 50 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 55 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 65 

O. K. & I. X. L . . . . " 400 " 70 

Resin-sized " 400 " 45 

Oiled Sheathing " 600 " 100 

Oiled " .... " 400 " 70 

Roof Coating, in barrels per gal. 17 

Roof small packages " 25 

. Refined Tar per barrel 5 00 

Coal Tar " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

Roofing Pitch per 100 lb. 1 10 

BULL RINGS. 

Copper, $2.00 for 24-inch, and $1.90 'or 2-inch. 

BUTTS. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list. 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, discount 60 per cent 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, discount 65, 10 and 24 per cent. 
Loose Pin, discount 65, 10 and 24 per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, discount 70,70 and 5 percent 
Gen. B ronzed per pair 40 65 

CARPET STRETCHERS. 

American per doz. 1 00 1 50 

Bullard's " 6 50 

CASTORS. 
Bed, new list, discount 55 to 574 per cent. 
Plate, discount 524 to 574 per cent. 

CATTLE LEADERS. 

Nos. 32 and 33 per gross 7 50 8 50 



BBKUIT WI1IK tlOODS 

Discount 62i per cent. 



Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump per cwt. 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon per gross 14 18 

CHISELS. 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad s, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 
Warnock's, discount 50 and 10 per cent 
P. S. & W. Extra, discount 60 and 10 per i-en 

POOD— STOCKS. 

Alternation I stork Foods, si packages, 

per doz. . . s8 (iO 

International Stock Foods, per paii . . . . 2 75 

per bbl 10 50 

Poultry " s'lpkgs .pirdz 8 00 
Worm Powders. joc.pkgs. " 4 00 
Pine Healing Oil, per doz ... 8 00 
Pheno-Chloro.Slpkgs.per doz 8 00 

Hoof Ointment 8 00 

Compound Absorbent 16 00 

Also 25c pkgs. at $2 per doz.; 50c. pkgs. at 
84 per doz. 

CLIPS. 
Axle.discount 65 per cent 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

A Word of Thanks to Our Customers. 

The past years business has been very satisfactory to us, and we are exceedingly obliged to 
you in consequence. 

We have done our best to please you at all times, and where we failed it was our misfortune, 
not our fault. 

Prospects are bright for another prosperous year, and we hope to continue our pleasant business 
relations with you. 

The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 

Toronto and Montreal. 



COMPASSES, DIVIDERS, ETC. 

American, discount 62i to 65 per cent. 

CONDUCTOR PIPE. 

Plain or Corrugated. 

2-inch per 100 feet 3 00 

3 •• " " 4 00 

4 •' " " 5 25 

5 " " " 675 

6 " " " 900 

CRADLES, GRAIN. 

Canadian, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 
CROSSCUT SAW HANDLES. 

S. & D., No. 3 per pair 174 

S. &D„ " 5 " 22{ 

S.&D., " 6 " 15 

Boynton pattern ' 20 

DOOR SPRINGS. 

Torrey'sRod perdoz 80 

Coil, 9 to 11 in " 95 1 65 

English " 2 00 4 00 

DRAW KNIVES. 
Coach and Wagoa, discount 50 and 10 pet 

cent. 
Carpenters' discount 60 and 10 per oent. 

DRILLS. 
Hand and Breast. 
Millar's talis, per doz., net list. 

DRILL BITS. 

Morse, discount 374 to 40 per cent. 
Standard, discount 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

FAUCETS. 

Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per cent. 

EAVETROUGHS. 

10-inch per 100 ft. 10 

elbows (stovepipe.) 

and 6-iuch, common per doz. 1 20 

7-inch " 1 35 

Polished, 15c. per dozen extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 

Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 

Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES AND HASPS. 

Great Western 70 and 10 per cent. 

Arcade 70 " 10 

Kearney & Foot 70 " 10 

Disstons 70 |J 10 " 

American 70 " 10 

J. Barton Smith 70 " 10 

McClellan 70 " 10 

Eagle 70 " 10 

Nicholson, GO and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 

Royal 80 

Globe 70 to 75 

Black Diamond. 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 per 

cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 271 per rem 
Nicholson File Co. s "Simplicity" file handle, 
per gross 85c. to SI. 50 

glass. ■ 
Window. Box Price, 

Star 1) Diamond 

Sue United Per Per Per Per 
Inches. 50 ft. 100 ft. 50 ft. 100ft. 

Under 26 3 10 .... 6 75 

26 to 40 3 30 .... 7 25 

41 to 50 3 70 .... 8 75 

51 to 60 4 00 .... 10 00 

61 to 70 5 00 .... 11 5' 

71 to 80 5 30 .... 12 50 

81to85 14 00 

86 to 90. .... 16 50 

91 to 95.. 18 00 

96 to 100 20 00 

A dts ount of 25 per cent, is offered on 
"Double Diamond.' 1 



GAUGES. 






Marking, Mortise, 


Etc. 




Stanley s. discount 50 to 55 per 


cent. 




Wire Gauges. 






Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33 . . . .each 


1 65 


2 40 


HALTERS. 






Rope, 2-inch per gross 

Rope, 4 " " 

Rope, J to S-inch .... " 

Leather, 1-inch per doz. 

Leather, 1} " " 

Web " 


3 874 

5 15 
1 87 


900 
14 00 

4 00 

5 20 
2 45 


HAMMERS. 






Nail. 






Maydole's, discount 5 to 10 per cent. Canadian 
discount 25 to 275 per cent 


Tack. 






Magnetic per doz. 


1 10 


1 20 


Sledge. 








071 


08J 


Ball Pean. 






English and Canadian, per lb. 


22 


25 


HANDLES. 






Axe, 2nd growth, per doz. net 
tore door perdoz. 


3 00 
1 00 


4 00 
1 50 


Fork. 






C. & B., discount 40 per cent., 


revised list. 


Hoe. 






C. & B., discount 40 per cent", 


revised list. 


Saw. 






American per do* 


1 00 


1 25 


Plane. 








3 15 


3 75 


Hammer and Hatchet. 




Canadian, discount 40 per cent 






Cross-Cut Saws 










13$ 


HANGERS. 


doz. 


pairs. 




6 00 


8 00 




4 50 
6 00 
9 00 


Lane's covered- 
No. 11, 5-foot run 

No. 11J, 10-foot run 

No. 12, 10-foot run 

No. 14, 15-foot run 

" track, 1 x 3-16 in 

" „ " l}x 3-16 in 


4 '66 


8 40 

10 80 
12 00 
21 00 

11 00 
3 90 
5 60 



HARVEST TOOLS. 

Discount 60 per cent. 

HATCHETS. 

Canadian, discount 40 to 421 per cent. 

HAT ENAMEL. 
Henderson & Potts "Anchor Brand 





HINGES. 




Ulind, Parkers, 


discouut 16^ per cent 




Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 


064 
06} 


" 




" " 




06 


" " 


8-in., " 


052 
051 


11 " 


10-in., " 


Light T and strap, discount 65 and 5 per cent. 


Screw hook and 


hinge— 




6 to 10 in 


. . . per 100 lb 


4 50 




" 


3 25 


Spring. No. 20, 


per gro. pairs 

HOES. 


10 50 


Garden, Mortar, 


etc., discount 60 per 


cent. 


Planter 


per doz. 4 00 


4 50 


hollow WARE. 




Discount 45 and 


5 per cent. 

HOOKS. 

Cast Tron. 








1 1(1 



Clothes line, No. 61. . " 00 70 

Harness " 60 12 00 

Hat and coat per gro. 1 10 10 00 

Chandelier perdoz. 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought hooks and staples Canadian dis- 
count 474 per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and coat, discount 45 per cent. 

Belt per 1,000 .... 60 

Screw, bright, discount 55 per cent. 

HORSE NAILS. 

"C" brand, 40, 10 and 74 per cent, off list ( Oval 
"M" brand, 55, per cent. I head 

Countersunk, 55 per cent. 
"Monarch," 50 and 74 per cent. 
"Peerless " 50 per cent. dis. 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 
No. 2 No. 1 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 

Light, medium and heavy 3 65 3 90 

Snow shoes 3 90 4 15 

Steel Shoes. 

XL, sizes 1 to 5 5 35 

Light, No. 2 and larger 3 80 

No. 1 and smaller 4 05 

Featherweight, all sizes to 4 5 35 

Toeweight, all sizes 1 to 4 6 60 

JAPANNED WARE. 

Discount %n& 5 per cent, off list, June 1899 

ICE PICKS, 

Star perdoz. 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 

Brass spun 74 per cent, discount off new list. 

Copper perlb. 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 per cent. 

KEYS. 

Lock, Canadian dis. 40 to 40 and 10 per cent. 
Cabinet, trunk and padlock, 
American per gross 60 

KNOBS. 

Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 150 250 

Bronze, Berlin per doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine .... " 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. & L. 

screw per gross 1 30 4 00 

White door knobs perdoz 100 

HAY knives 
Net prices. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS 

Cold Blast perdoz. 7 00 

No. 3, "Wright's" " 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner. ... 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast " 9 00 

No. " 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized " 187 3 85 

King, wood " 2 75 2 90 

King, glass " 4 00 4 50 

All glass " 50 90 

LINES. 

Fish per gross 1 0c 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LAWN MOWERS. 

Woodyatt, 12-in. wheel 8 50 

Star " 6 25 

Daisy " (net) 2 45 

Philadelphia, 12-in. wheel 7 00 

Ontario, 14 25 

King Edward, 12 in 9 00 

Discount, 50 per cent., with freight conceB 
sinus in quantity shipments 

Maxwell & Sons : 

10V4-in. high wheel 7 50 10 00 

9-in 5 50 6 25 

8-in 49 5 50 

Discount 50 per cent. 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, 40 to 40 and 10 per cent. 
Russell & Erwin per doz. 3 00 3 25 

60 



Cabinet. 
Eagle, discount 30 per cent. 

Padlocks. 

English and Am per doz. 50 K 00 

Eagle, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 

Iron and Brass. 
Flat head, discount 25 per cent. 
Round head, discount 20 per cent. 

MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths perdoz. 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory, " 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae " 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 060 200 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian perdoz. 5 50 6 50 

MEAT CUTTERS. 

American, discount 334 per cent. 

German, 15 per cent. 

Gem each 1 15 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS 

Discount 25 per cent. 

nails. Cut. Wire 

2d and 3d 3 45 3 45 

3d 3 10 3 12 

4and5d 2 85 2 95 

6 and 7d 2 75 2 80 

8 and 9d 2 60 2 60 

10 and 12d . ' 2 55 2 55 

16and20d 2 50 2 50 

30, 40, 50 and 60d (base) 2 45 2 45 

Cut nails in carlots 5c. less. 

Wire nails in carlots are 82.40. 

Steel cut nails 10c. extra. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, discount 15 per cent. 

Coopers' nails, discount 30 per cent. 

nail pullers. 
German and American 1 75 50 

NAIL SETS. 

Square, round and octagon, 

pergross 3 38 

Diamond 100 ? 

POULTRY NETTING. 

2-in. Mesh, 19w.g., dis. 60 percent. 
2-in. Mesh, 16 w.g. and heavipr, 50 p.c. 

OAKUM. 

U. S. Navy per 100 lb 6 75 

Plumbers . . .' " .... 3 00 

OILERS. 
McClary s Model galvanized 

oil can, with ounip, 5 gallon, 

per dozen 10 00 

Zinc and tin, discount 50, 50 and 10 per cent 

Copper per doz. 1 25 3 50 

Brass " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, discount 25 per cent 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 

Dufferin pattern pails, discount 45 per i 

Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45 per cent 

PIECED WARE. 

Discount 40 per cent off list, June, 1899 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, discount 40 per cent 
6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails, dis. 40 per cen'. 
Creamer cans, discount 40 per cent. 

PICKS. 
Per dozen 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS 

Porcelain head pergross 1 39 1 50 

Brass head " 40 100 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin anil gilt, discount 75 per cent. 
PINE TAR. 

1 pint in tins per gross ... 7 80 

t " " s .... 9 60 

PLANKS 

Wooil bench, Canadian discount 40 per cent., 

American discount 50 per cent. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American, 374 fo 

40 per cent. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Hammerless Shot Gun 

GUARANTEED FOR NITRO POWDERS 



Grade K. Made with 
Remington blued 
steel barrels. 




Send for Catalogue containing 
complete description of Guns, 
$25.00 to $250.00, mailed free. 



Grade K E D. Made 
with Damascus 
barrels and Auto- 
matic Ejector. 



REMINGTON ARMS CO., ILION, N.Y., 

SOLD BY LEADING CANADIAN DEALERS. NOT RETAILED BV THE MANUFACTURERS. 



313-317 Broadway, New York. 
86-88 First St., San Francisco, Cal. 



PLANE IRONS. 

English perdoz. 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

Mutton's genuine, per doz. pairs, discount 
374 to 40 per cent. 

Button's imitation perdoz. 5 00 9 00 

German " 60 60 

PRESSED SPIKES. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse perdoz. 55 100 

Axle " 22 33 

Screw " 27 1 00 

Awning " 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 1 80 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddler's .per doz. 1 00 1 85 

Conductor's " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners', solid per set 72 

" hollow per inch — 100 

RAKES. 

Wood per doz. net 1 20 up. 

razors. per doz. 
4 00 18 00 



4 00 
7 50 

12 50 
3 60 
7 00 
6 00 

10 00 



18 00 

11 00 
15 00 

10 00 

12 00 

12 00 

11 00 
15 00 
10 75 

13 00 
13 50 
13 50 
10 .50 



Elliot's 

Geo. Butler's & Co.'s 

Boker's 

" King Cutter 

Wade & Butcher's 

Theile &. Quack's 

Bailey's 

Bailey's Brantf ord 

Carbo Magnetic 

Griffon Barber's Favorite 

Griffon No. 65 

Griffon Safety Razors 

(! riff on Stropping Machines. . 
Lewis Bros.' " Klean Kutter" 

REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 

Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 and 

10 per cent. 
Iron Burrs, discount 55 per cent. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons, Jc 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in J-lb cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets, with usual proportion burrs, 4o 

per cent, discount. Cartons, lc. per lb. 

extra, net. 
Copper Burrs only, discount 30 and 10 per cent. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets, 4-lb. 

cartons, lc. per 11). 

RIVET SETS. 
Canadian, discount 35 to 374 per cent. 

ROPE, ETC. 

Sisal 114 

Pure Manilla 144 

"British" Manilla 12 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 00 

" 5-32 inch 00 

J inch 00 

Russia Deep Sea 15 

Jute 08 

Lath Yarn, single 11 

double 114 

Sisal bed cord, 48 feet per doz. 65 

" 60 feet " 80 

" 72 feet " 95 



Boxwood, discount 55 per ceut. 
Ivory, discount 374 to 40 per cent. 

SAD IRONS. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished. ...per set (' 80 

No. 50, nickle-plated, " 90 

* 'iiinmoti. plain 4 50 

plated 5 50 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 

B. & A. 3and, discount, 40 and 5 per cent 
Emery, discount 40 per cent. 
Garnet (Rurton's), 5 to 10 per cent, advance 
on list 



SAP SPOUTS. 

Bronzed iron with hooks per 1,000 7 50 

SAWS. 

Hand, Disston's, discount 124 per cent. 

S. & D., discount 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's. . ..per foot 35 55 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent, on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete each 75 2 75 

' ' frame only 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional per 100 lb 2 25 

Solid " .... 1 75 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 22 25 

saw sets. per doz. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets, Perfect 4 00 

X -Cut Sets, " 7 50 

SCALES. 
Gurney Standard, 40 per cent. 
Gurney Champion, 50 per cent. 
Burrow, Stewart & Milne — 

Imperial Standard, discount 40 per cenc. 

Weigh Beams, discount 35 per cent. 

Champion Scales, discount 50 per cent. 
Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per ceut. 

" Dominion, discount 55 per cent 

, " Richelieu, discount 55 per cent. 

Warren's new Standard, discount 40 percent. 

" " Champion, discount 50 per cent. 

" Weighbeams, discount 35 per cent. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's perdoz. 65 100 

SCREEN DOORS. 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 
stained, 4-in. style per doz. 6 80 

Common doors,2 or 3 panel, yellow and 
green stained, 4-iu. style... .per doz. 7 00 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, in natural 
colors, oil finish per doz. 8 15 

3-in. style 20c. per dozen less. 

SCREWS. 

Wood, F. H., bright and steel, discount 874 

»er cent. 
Wood, R. H., bright, dis. 824 percent. 

" F. H., brass, dis. 80 per cent. 

" R. H., " dis. 75 per cent. 

' F. H., bronze, dis. 75 per cent. 
' R. H., " dis. 70 per cent. 
Drive Screws, dis. 874 per cent. 
Bench, wood per doz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, case hardened, dis. 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent. 

scythes. 
Perdoz. net 6 00 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 

Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

SHEARS. 

Bailey Cutlery Co., full nickeled, discou 

and 24 per cent. 
Bailey Cutlery, Japan Handles, discount 674 

per cent. 
Seymour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 

Canadian, discount 45 per cent. 

SINKS. 

Cast iron, 16x24. 85 

18x30 100 

18x36 1 40 

SNAP8. 

Harness, German, discount 25 per cent. 
Lock, Andrews' 4 50 11 50 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, 14-lb per lb 37 

2-lb. or over " 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493 perdoz. 2 40 2 55 

" No. 494 " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, discount 60 to 60 and 5 per cent. 
Try and Bevel, discount 50 to 524 per cent. 

STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, discount 75 and 124 per cent, off re- 
vised list. 
Retinned. discount 75 per cent, off revised list. 

61 



STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 00 

Plain 2 80 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 per cent. 

STOCKS AND DIES 

American discount 25 per cent. 

STONE. 

Washita per lb. 28 60 

Hindostan " 06 07 

slip " 09 09 

Labrador " 13 

" Axe " ... 15 

Turkey " .... 50 

Arkansas " .... 1 50 

Water-of-Ayr " .... 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, 2-in., 40 to 200 lb, per ton .... 25 00 

" under 40 lb., " .... 28 00 

" under 2 in. thick, " .... 29 00 

STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths 7 00 

7 inch " " ■•■• 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 

No. 4, 3 doz. in case . . net cash 4 80 

No. 6, 3 doz. in ase.. " 8 40 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 and 15 

•• " tinned 80 and 20 

(in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only 80 

" $ weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 and 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk. . . .85, 124 and 12). 
" brush, blued and tinned 

bulk 70 

Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 and 124 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpet taens oo 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails o24 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads *J 

Fine finishing *0 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

in bulk lo 

solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails, in papers 10 

" in bulk Ifi 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in doz- 
ens only ™ 

/inc. glaziers points ^ 

Double pointed tacks, papers. . 90 ami 10 

■• •' " bulk.... 40 

Clinch and duck rivets 45 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin per doz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Cbcstermau's each 90 2 85 

steel each 80 8 00 

tinners' snips. 
Bailey's, discount 25 per cent. 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, discount 75 to 75 and 10 
per cent. 

traps (steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, discount 25 per cent. 
Game, H. & N , P. S. & W., 65 per cent. 
Game, steel, 724, 75 per cent. 

TROWELS. 

Disston's, discount 10 per cent. 

German per doz.. 4 7o 6 00 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 19 

•' " 4-ply 23 

Mattress per lb. 33 45 

Staging " 27 3d 

VISES. 

Wright's 134 

Brook's 121 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 350 

K " " No. 2 5 50 

Saw Vise * 50 9 00 

Columbia Hardware Co. 
Blacksmiths' (discount) 60 percent 

parallel (discount) 45 per cent 



enamelled ware. 
White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White 

discount 50 per cent 

Diamond, Famous, Premier, discount 50 and 

10 per cent 

Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, discount 

50, 10 and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 

Smooth Steel Wire. 
No. 0-9 gauge $2 50 

10 " 6c. extra. 

11 " 12c. 

12 " 20e. 

13 " 30c. 

14 " 40c. 

15 " 55c. 

16 " 70c 

Add 60c. for coppering and $2 for tinning. 
Extra net per 100 lb. —Oiled wire 10c.. 
spring wire $1.25, special hay baling wire 30c, 
best steel wire 75c., bright soft drawn 15c., 
charcoal (extra quality) SI. 25, packed in casks 
or cases 15 ■., bagging and papering 10c., 50 
and 100-lb. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. bundles 
15c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in 1-lb. 
hanks, 50c, in 4-"'- hanks 75c, in J-lb. 
hanks $1. 

Fine Steel Wire, discount 25 per cent. 
List of extras: Iu 100-lb. lots: No. 17, 
#5— No. 18, $5.50— No. 19, $6-No. 20, $6.65— 
No. 21, $7— No. 22, $7.30— No. 23, $7,65— No. 
24, $8— No. 25, $9-No. 26, $9.50-No. 27, 
$10-No. 28, $ll-No. 29, $12-No. 30, $13- 
No.31, $14— No. 32, $1.5— No. 33, $16-No. 34, 
$17. Extras net—tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, 
$2— Nos. 26-31, $4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 
5c— oiling, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles,d5c— in 5 
and 10-lb. bundles, 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 25c 
— in J-lb. hanks, 38c — in }-lb. hanks, 50c — 
packed in casks or cases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c. 
Brass wire, discount 60 per cent, off the list. 
Copper wire, discount 60 per cent, net cash 

30 days, f.o.b factory. 
Galvanized wire, per 100 lb.— Nos. 4 and 5, 
$3.70 to $3.70-Nos. 6, 7, 8, $3.15 to $3.15 
-No. 9, $2.55 - No. 10, $3.20 to $3.20 
—No. 11, $3.25 to $3 25 — No. 12, $2.6= 
-No. 13, $2.75 -No. 14. $3.75 to$3.75-No 
15, $4.30— No. 16. $4.30. Base sizes, Nos. 
6 to 9, $2,274 f-o.b. Cleveland. Iu carlots 
124c less. 
Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand, No. 17, 
$4.65; No. 18. $2.90: No. 19, $2.60. Hollow 
6 strand, No. 17, $4.30; No. 18, $2.70; No. 
19, $2.35; No. 20, $2.30, f.o.b. Hamilton, 
Toronto, Montreal. 

WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 2 80 

Galvanized, plain twist 2 80 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2 554 in 
less than carlots, and $2 45 in carlots. 

COILED SPRING WIRE. 

High Carbon, No. 9 $2 75 

No. 11 3 40 

No. 12 2 95 

WIRE CLOTH. 

Painted Screen, per lOOsq. ft., net. . 1 50 
Terms, 3 per cent, off 30 days. 

WASHING MACHINES. 
St ephenson Washer, per doz 45 00 

WRENCHES. 

Acme, discount 35 to 374 per cent. 
Agricultural, discount 60 per cent. 

Coe's Genuine, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

Towers' Engineer each 2 00 7 00 

S perdoz. 5 80 6 00 

G. &K.sPipe " .... 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe each .... 3 00 

Pocket per doz. 2d i 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. 30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian ■ • ■ • f* «" 

Royal American i( ••■• '* "" 

Sampson It •■•■ |J [Jj 

'Terms, 4 months, or 3 per cent. 30 days. 

WROUGHT IRON WASBER8. 

Canadian make, discounts per cent. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 



Accountants and Auditors 57 

Adams Co 25 

Alabastine 45 

American Shearer Mfg. Co 5 

American Sheet Steel Co 52 

American Steel and Wire Co 6 

Atkins. E. C, & Co 53 

Atlas Mfg. Co 53 

Auer Light Co 49 

Australasian Hardware 9 

Bailey Cutlery Co Inside back cover 

Barnett. G. k H Co Outside back cover 

Barristers. Solicitors, elc 57 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co 24 

Baynes Charles 53 

Bell Telephone Co 54 

Belleville Business College 57 

Berlin Robe k Clothing Co 5 

Birkett. Thos.. k Son Co 2 

Bliss Mfg. Co., R 64 

Boker, H, k Co Outside front cover 58 

Booth Copper Co 53 

Bowman, John, Hardware & Coal Co.. 10 

Bradst reef's 64 

Briggs Ledger System Co 54 

Canada Corundum Co 23 

Canada Foundry Co 21 

Canada lion Furnace Co 33 

Canada Linseed Oil Mills 43 

Canada Metal Co 21 

Canada Paint Co 46 

Canada Paper Co 13 

Canadian Cordage and Mfg. Co 11 

Canadian Corr. College 57 

Canadian Rubber Co 1 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co 33 

Cary, Philip 6 

Coltart k Cameron 25 

Connor, J. H., & Son 64 

Consumers' Cordage Co 4 

Covert Mfg. Co 5 

Crosby, G. A., & Co 7 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co 25 i 

Deseronto Iron Co 33 



Dodge Mfg. Co 23 

Dods, P. D, & Co 45 

Dominion Belting Co 18 

Dominion Wire Mfg. Co, C 

Donaldson, Robt., & Co 25 

Dowswell Mfg. Co 9 

I ) 1 1 in las Axe Works 50 

Dunlop Tire Co 5 

Empire Machine k Metal Stamping Co. 21 

Enterprise Mfg. Co 7 

Erie Specialty Co 64 

Fairbanks Co 18 

Fairgrieve Mfg. Co 21 

Ford k Featherstone 54 

Francis-Frost Co 47 

Gabriel & Schall 42 

Grant Hamilton Oil Co 43 

Gibb, Alexander 64 

Globe Paint Co 45 

Grand River Metal Works 53 

Great Western Brand Files 34 

Greening, B., Wire Co 6 

Grose, Walter 34 

Guelph Waterproof Clothing Co 5 

Gurney Foundry Co 49 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co 

Outside back cover 

Hallwood Cash Register Co 54 

Hamilton Stamp and .Stencil Works 21 

Hanover Portland Cenu nt Co 53 

Harkins k Willis 24 

Harrington k Richardson Arms Co 7 

Hart k Riddell 54 

Henderson k Potts Co 44 

Heinisch, R. , Sons Co 62 

Hobbs Mfg. Co 41 

Howland, H. S, Sons & Co 17 

Hutton, James, k Co 59 

Hyde, F. & Co 33 

Imperial Tea Strainer Co 24 

t International Stock Food Co L'3 

^Ironside, Son k Co 7 



Jackson, C. F., k Co 34 



&Co. 



Jardine, A. B., 

Jenking, A. C. 

Johnrcn, Iver, Arms k Cycle Works . . 

Kay Electric Dynamo and Motor Co. . . 

Kemp Mfg. Co 

Kennedy Hardware Co 

Kerr Engine Co 

Korn, Geo. W., Razor Mfg. Co 



21 
53 
16 
18 

12 

8 

21 

64 

Langwell's Babbit Outside front cover 

Leslie, A. C, k Co 33 

Lewis Bros, k Co 3 

Lockerby k McCorub 50 

London Rolling Mill Co 9 

Lufkin Rule Co Inside back cover 

Lysaght, John Outside front cover 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co 24 

Maxwell, D., & Co 8 

Meadows. Geo. B 7 

Metallic Rooting Co 35 

Metropolitan Bank 38 

Morrow, John, Machine Screw Co 34 

MacLeanPublishingCo. inside lack cover 10 

MeArthur, Corneille & Co 43 

McCaskill, Dougall & Co 

Outside back cover 

McClary Mfg. Co 26 

McDougall, R., Co 33 

Xerlich & Co 50 

Newman, W., k Sons 53 

Nobles k Hoare 45 

North Bros. Mfg. Co 1 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co 33 

Oakey, John, & Sons 33 

Oneida Community 5 

Ontario Silver Co 62 

Ontario Tack Co 14 

Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co. . . 62 

Ormsby, A. B., k Co 53 

Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Co 9 



Page Wire; Fence Co 57 

Paterson Mfg. Co 60 

Peck Rolling Mills Co 26 

Phillips, Charles D 53 

Pullman Mnfg. Co 62 

Ramsay, A., k Son 49 

Remington Arms Co fl 

Rice Lewis k Son Inside front cover 

Russell k Erwin Mfg. Co 2 

Salyerds, E. B 62 

Samuel, M. k L., Benjamin, & Co 2 

Sessenwein Bros 34 

Seymour Henry T., Shear Co 62 

Sherwin-Williams Co 14 

Silbcrstein. A. L 1 

Slingsby, H. C 7 

Smith ikHenienwjy Co 62 

Solarine Metal Polish 5 

Standard Paint and Varnish Works 45 

Sterne, G. F 24 

St. Margaret's College 57 

Sun Portland Cement Co 53 

Syracuse Smelting Works 21 

Taylor-Forbes Co 12 

Taylor. J. & J 54 

Thompson, B. k S. H., Co 

Outside back cover 

Thome R. E 45 

Trees, Samuel, & Co 5 

United Factories 47 

Wallace-Barnes ' 50 

Walter, E. F., k Co 8 

Wnrnock, James. & Co 18 

Weese, G. A., k Son 54 

Western Assurance Co 54 

Western Business College 57 

Western Foundry Co Inside back cover 

Willis' Business College 57 

Wright, E. T., & Co 25 



ONTARIO SILVER CO., 

Limited, 
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

- , , FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 

Manufacturers of ELECTRO PLATE. . 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 




"Pullman" 
Lawn Sprinkler 

is YOUR 
ORDER IN? 

Send for Folder No.14. 

PULLMAN MNFG. CO. 
Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A. 



ONTARIO WIND ENGINE 




Have about 100 dozen 

HOCKEY STICKS 

left over from the manufacture of 
this season, which I can offer at 
a reduced rate such as 



Men's X, 
" Culls, 



$1.50 
$1.10 



You will find some very good lines 
among the Men's Culls, and Men's X are 
clear sticks. 

E. B. SALYERDS, Preston, Ont. 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 




Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc 

ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. KiCT'.ff VP 




Long Chain Nose 
Side=cutting Plyer 



Used by machinists, engineers, Jewelers, optic 
lans, electricians, etc. 
Forged from the best tool steel, and guaranteed free trom defects. 

Send for the "Green Book" of Hardware Specialties for description ana price. 

THE SMITH. HEMENWAY & CO. UTICA DROP FOPCE & TOOL CO 

Mfrs. of Cutlery and Hardware Specialties. Mfrs. of Nippers and Plyers. 

291 Broadway New York, New York. 
Canadian Sample Room : 2l5Corlst!ne Blrli., MONTREAL. ALLEV C. JENKING. Canadian Manager . 



SEYMOUR 

SHEAR CO. 



TRADE MARK 



SEYMOUR SHEARS 



HAVE BEEN THE 

Standard for over Half a Century. 

"quality unquestioned." 

Each pair of our 6heara bears the above trade mark 



Complete Line TRIMMERS , BANKERS', BARBERS' and TAIL 
ORS' SHEARS, Etc., Etc. 

Henry T. Seymour Shear Company. 

WIEBUSCH & HILGER, Limited, NEW YORK, Sole Agents. 

62 




SEYMOUR 

SHEAR CO. 



****&: 



TRADE MARE 



Latest Cata- 
logue will b» 

sent in 

exchange for 

your business 

card. 



HARbWARB ANb MBTAL 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Accountants and Auditors. 

Barber, Henry & Co., Toronto. 
Fahey, Win., Toronto. 
Hoskins, David, Toronto. 
Jenkins k Hardy, Toronto. 
Kidd, F. H., Toronto. 
Merson, Geo. O., Toronto. 
Williamson, T. G., Toronto. 

Anvils 

Boker, Henry, Montreal. 

Axes Hatchets, Scythes, etc, 

American Axe and Tool Co., Montreal. 
Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont. 

Babbitt Metal. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Fairbanks Co.. Montreal and Toronto, 
ljangwell's, Montreal. 
Syracuse Smelting Works, Montreal. 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

Atwatcr, Duclos k Cbauvin, Montreal. 
Beatty, Blackstock, Fasken k Riddell, 

Toronto. 
Burritt, James H., K.C., Pembroke, Ont. 
Cameron, D. O., Toronto. 
Hamilton, J. C, Toronto. 
Tupper, Phippen k Tupper, Winnipeg. 
Vidal, I. L. <>., Montmagny and Quebec. 



Belting, Hose, etc. 

Canadian Rubber Co., Montreal and 

Toronto. 
Dominion Belting Co.. Hamilton. 
iiutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co., 

Toronto. 
Pullman Mfg. Co., Rochester, NY. 

Box Straps. 

Dartnell, E. F. Montreal. 
Warminton, J. N., Montreal, Que. 

Brass Goods. 

Nicklin, J., & Co., Birmingham, Eng. 

Brushes and Brooms. 
United Factories, Toronto. 

Buffalo Robes. 

Berlin Robe & Clothing Co., Berlin, Ont. 

Carpenters' and Builders' Tools 
and Supplies. 

Atkins, E. C, k Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Baynes, Chas., Blackburn, Eng. 
Bliss, R., Mfg. Co., Pawtucket, R.I. 
Cartland, Jas., k Sons, Birmingham.Eng. 
Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 
Howland, H. S. Sons k Co., Toronto 
Hyde. F., & Co., Montreal. 
Lamplough, F. W. & Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Bros, k Co., Montreal. 
Rice Lewis k Son, Toronto. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 
Metallic Roofing Co. , Toronto. 
Newman k Sons, Birmingham. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Ormsby, A. B., & Co., Toronto. 
Phillips, Chas. D., Newport, Eng. 
Smith k Hemenway Co., New York. 
Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain. 

Conn. 
Union Mfg. Co., New Britain. Conn. 

Carpet Stretcher. 

Grand River Metal Works, Gait. Ont. 

Carriage and Waggon Ac- 
cessories. 

Dunlop Tire Co., Toronto 
Warnock, James, k Co., Gait, Ont. 

Cash Registers. 
Hallwood Cash Register Co.. Toronto. 

Churns. 

Maxwell, David, k Sons, St. Marys. 

Clippers — All Kinds. 

American Shearer Mfg. Co.,Nashua,N.H. 
Burman & Sons, Birmingham, Eng. 

Cordage 

Canadian Cordage and Mfg. Co., Peter- 
borough, Ont. 
Consumers' Cordage Co., Montreal. 
Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 

Corundum. 

Canada Corundum Co., Toronto. 

Cutlery — Razors, Scissors, etc. 

Bailey Cutlery Co., Brantford, Ont. 
Birkett, Thos., &.Son Co., Ottawa. 



Boker, Henry. Montreal. 
Gem Cutlery Co., New York. 
Heinisch's, R., Sons Co., Newark, N.J. 
Hutton, James, k Co.. Montreal. 
Korn, Geo. W., Razor Mfg. Co., Little 

Valley, N.Y. 
Silberstein, A. L., New York. 
Smith & Hemenway Co., New York. 
Wiebusch k Hilger, New York. 

Educational. 

Belleville Business College, Belleville. 
Canadian Corr. College, Toronto. 
St. M argaret's College, Toronto. 
Willis Business College, Ottawa, Out. 
Western Business College, Toronto. 

Electro-Pla ting. 

Sutherland. D., Toronto. 

Rngra vers. 

Legg Bros.. Toronto. 

F'iles and Rasps. 
Barnett Co.. G. k H.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grose, Walter, Montreal. 

Financial Institutions. 

Bank of Toronto, Toronto, 
Bradstreet Co. 

British American Assurance Co., Toronto. 
Canada Permanent Mtg. Co., Toronto. 
Canadian Bank of Commerce, Toronto. 
Confederation Life Ass., Toronto. 
Dom. of Can. Guarantee to., Toronto. 
Metropolitan Bank, Toronto. 
Toronto General Trusts, Toronto. 
Western Assurance Co.. Toronto. 

Firearms and Ammunition. 

Hamilton Rine Co.. Plymouth, Mich. 

Iver Johnson's Arms and Cycle Works, 
Fitchburg, Mass 

Remington Arms Co., Ilion, N.Y. 

Union Metallic (. artrjdge Co. . Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Food Choppers 

Bowman, John, Hardware & Coal Co., 

London, Ont. 
Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Russell k Erwiu Mfg. Co., New Britain, 

Conn. 
Smith & Hemenway Co., New York. 

Gas Lamps and Sundries. 

Auer Light Co., Montreal. 

Hardware Specialties. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 
Hockey Sticks, Pucks, etc. 

Nerlich & Co. ^Toronto. 
SalyerdB, E. B7 Preston, Out. 

Horse Blankets and Carriage 
Rugs. 

Guelph Waterproof Clothing Co..Guelph. 
Trees, Samuel. k Co.. Toronto. 

Horseshoe Pads. 

Canadian Rubber Co., Montreal. 
Dunlop Tire Co., Toronto. 

Ice Cream Freezer s. 

Dana & Co. , Cincinnati, O. 
Ice Cutting Tools. 

Donaldson, Robt. , k Sons, Montreal. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa 

Iron' Pipe. 

Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Co., Guelph. 

Iron Pumps. 

McDougall, R., Co., Gait, Ont. 
Lanterns. 

Wright. E. T.. i; Co., Hamilton. 

Lawn Mowers. 

Maxwell, David, k Sons, St. Marys Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Ledgers and Office Stationery. 
Briggs Ledger System Co., Toronto. 
Hart k Riddell, Toronto. 
Weese, G. A. k Son, Toronto. 

Lumbermen's Supplies. 

Birkett, Thos., k Son Co., Ottawa. 

Machinery. 

Canada Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Crosby, G. A., & Co., Sarnia, Ont. 
Dodge Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Empire Machine and Metal Stamping 
Co., Toronto. 



Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto 
Jardine, A. B., & Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
Kay Electric Dynamo and Motor Co., 

Toronto. 
Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Morrow MachineScrew Co.,Ingersoll,Ont 
Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co. 
Toronto. 

Mantels. 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co., Toronto 

Manufacturers' Agent. 

Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 

Metals. 

American Sheet Steel Co., New York. 

Booth Copper Co., Toronto. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co., Midland, Out. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Deseronto Iron Co., Deseronto. Ont. 

Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 

Ironside, Son k Co., London, Eng. 

Jackson, C. F., &Co., Vancouver, B.C. 

Leslie, A. 0.. k Co., Montreal. 

London Rolling Mills Co., London, Ont. 

Lysaght, John, Bristol, Eng. 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co., New 

Glasgow, N.S. 
Peck Rolling Mills, Montreal. 
Samuel, Benjamin & Co., Toronto. 
Thompson, B. k S. H. k Co., Montreal. 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, etc. 

Falkiner, H. F., Toronto, 
Hutton, Jas., & Co., Montreal. 
Oakey, John, k Sons, London, Eng. 

Milk Cans and Trimmings. 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
McClary Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Nickel-Plated Ware. 

Colt art k Cameron. Winnipeg. 

Paints, Oils and Glass, 

Alabastine Co., Paris, Ont. 
Canada Linseed Oil Mills, Montreal. 
Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Toronto. 
Dods, P. D., k Co., Montreal. 
Francis-Frost Co. , Toronto. 
Gabriel & Schall, New York. 
Globe Paint Co., Toronto. 
Grant-Hamilton Oil Co., Toronto. 
Henderson & Potts, Montreal and 

Halifax. 
Hobbs Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 
Jamieson, R. C, & Co., Montreal. 
McArthur, Corneille k Co., Montreal. 
McCaskill, Dougall k Co., Montreal. 
Nobles k Hoare, London, Eng. 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Ramsay k Son, Montreal. 
Ridout, Geo., & Co., Toronto. 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 
Standard Paint and Varnish Works, 

Windsor, Ont. 
Thome. R. E., Montreal. 

Perforated Sheet Metals. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Plumbers' Supplies. 

Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Portland Cement. 

Grey and Bruce Portland Cement Co., 

Owen Sound. 
Hanover Portland Cement Co.. Han 

over, Ont. 
Hyde, F., k Co , Montreal. 
Sun Portland Cement Co., Owen Sound. 

Radiators, Furnaces, Stoves, 
Tinware, etc. 

Adams Co., Dubuque, Iowa. 
Dominion Radiator Co., Toronto, Ont. 
Gurney Foundry Co. , Toronto. 
Kemp Mnfg. Co., Toronto. 
Sterne, G. F., Brantford, Ont. 
Western Foundry Co., Winghaui. 
Wright, E. T..k Co., Hamilton. 

Roofing Supplies. 

Jenking, A. C, Montreal. 
Lockerby k McComb, Montreal. 
Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 
Ormsby, A. B., k Co., Toronto. 
Paterson Mfg. Co., Toronto & Montreal 

Sates. ' 

Ford k Featherstone, Hamilton. 
Taylor, J. k J., Toronto. 

Scales. 

Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 

Screws, Nuts, Bolts, Etc. 

Canada Screw Co. Hamilton. 
Morrow, ijohn, Machine Screw Co., 
Ingersoll, Ont. 



Sewer Pipes. 

Canadian Sever Pipe Co., Hamilton. 
Hyde, P., &Co., Montreal. 

ShelfBoxcs. 

Bennett Mfg. Co., Pickering, Out 

Shelf Brackets. 

Atlas Mfg. Co., New Haven, Conn. 
Grand River Metal Works, Gait. Ont, 

Silver-Plated Ware. 

Ontario Silver Co., Niagara Falls. 
Toronto Silver Plate Co., Toronto. 
Standard Silver Co., Toronto 

Skates. 

Boker, Henry, Montreal. 

Sporting Goods. 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co., Litfts, Pa 

Springs. 

Wallace, Barnes Co. , Bristol, Conn, 

Steel Castings. 

Montreal Steel Works. Montreal 

Steel Rails. 

Jackson, C. F., & Co., Vancouver, B (' 
Sessenwein Bros,. Montreal. 

Stencils. Stamps, etc. 

Hamilton Stamp and Stencil Works 
Hamilton. Ont 

Stock Food. 

International Stock Food Co.. Toronto. 

Tea Strainer. 

Imperial Tea Strainer Co., Montreal. 
Toasters 

Fairgrieve Mfg. Co., Toronto 
Harkins & Willis. Ann Arbor. Mich. 

Traps. 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co., LititZ, Pa. 
Tubes. 

Milieu, John, & Sons, Mnnl real 

Wall Paper. 

Staunton's Limited, Toronto. 

Warehousing and Warehouse 
Trucks. 

Coltart & Cameron, Winnipeg 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal 
Slingsby, H. C, Montreal. 

Washing Machines, etc. 

Connor, J. H., & Son, Ottawa, Can 
Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Watches. 

tngersoll, Robt. H., ,v Bro., New York. 

Waterproof Covers & Clothing. 

Guelph Waterproof Clothing Co., Guelph. 

Wholesale Hardware. 

Birkett, Thos., & Sons Co., Ottawa 
Bowman, John, Hardware k Coal Co 

London, Ont. 
t anada Hardware Co., Montreal 
Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal 
Howland, H. S., Sons k Co., Toronto 
Kennedy Hardware Co,, Toronto 
Lewis Bros, k Co., Montreal. 
Rice Lewis & Son, Toronto. 

Woodenware. 

United Factories, Toronto. 

Wire, Wire Rope, Cow Tics, 
Fencing Tools, etc. 

American Steel and Win Co \ u 

York, Montreal, Chicago. 
Dennis Wire and Iron Co . London, Ont 

nonunion Wire Mnfg. Co., Montreal and 

Toronto. 
Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton 
Ironside, Son ,*; Co., London, Eng 
Meadows, Ceo. li., Co., Toronto. 
Oneida Community. Niagara Falls 
Page Wire Fence Co., Walkerville (tin 
Walter. E. F. & Co., Montreal. 

Wrapping Papers. 
Canada Paper Co., Toronto. 



63 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

CHAS. P. CLARK, President. 



JARED CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 



...ESTABLISHED 1849... 




IMPROVED 
WASHING MACHINE. 



The nibbing board in this washer works eccentrically on 
the clothes in such a way that it both rubs and squeezes the 
clothes with every stroke of the rubbing board. 

LARGEST CAPACITY. STRONGLY MADE. 

NEATLY FINISHED. 

THE BEST FOR THE MONEY. 

We have nine other kinds, send for our catalogue. 

J. H. CONNOR & SON, Limited 

Manufacturers 

Washing Machines and Clothes Wringers, 

Pretoria Ave., ^aw^ OTTAWA 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices: Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

XHE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and the 
■on rolling cneuiimtauces of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the merchants, 
iy *be merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no effort Is spared, and 
10 reasonable expense considered too great, that ihe results may Justify its claim as an authority on all matters 
.fleeting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have been steadily extended, and it 
.•ir ilshes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, Jobbing and 
nan ifacturtng concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and bn-lnesn corporations. Specific 
lerms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



-OFFICES IN CANADA- 



HALIFAX, N.8. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVER. B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
4UEBEC. QUE. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPEG. MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C. IRVING. G°n. Man. Western Canada, Toronto, 





l— 


.1 

i.;illllllll!!!!lillllllll!?P"j ' 
° i 


■_!2i^n La^=S ■ 


Established Cable Address, 
18S2. "Bliss." , 

HAND FACT DBKB8 1 

Wood Turnings, Hand, 
Bench and other Screws 
Mallets, Handles, Vises 

Clamps, Tool Chests 

Croquet, Lithographs 
Wood Toys, Novelties 

and also the celebrated 

Wood's £»*•"* c»' 

Cate 

For Street and Steam Rail- 
road Cars, 
The R. BLISS MFG. CO. 
Pawtuoket, R.I., U.S. A . 




■"-"- p'*mWn 


-, 


.-^^ZilJZZn 



Canadian Representative: 
75 YEARS 



ALEXANDER GIBB, 13 St. John St., MONTREAL. 



ESTABLISHED 1825 



75 YEARS 





EVOLUTION IN RAZOR GRINDING. 





TH 



AMERICAN DOUBLE HOLLOW. 



Have you ever seen a razor too good to be used on your face ? 

The old-fashioned way to grind a razor was the English full hollow, but it was found that, if ground thick, it was harsh on the face, if very thin- it would 
vibrate or would not shave clean. 

About 30 years ago a new style of grinding was invented, the German full concaved; this was found better; it had only one fault, being thick above the 
edge it cannot easily be kept sharp on a strop, you have to hone it very often. We are making a newly Patented Razor, the American Double Hollow, which 
has two distinct hollows. This razor, if properly used on a strop, practically never needs honing, because it is so thin above the edge. Try it and you will 
be more than pleased. 

JCaverhlll, Learmont £> Co., Montreal. ftPfl W I/Mltt T) A r7flTi luTT?ft Pfi LITTLE VALLEY, N.Y. 



AGENTS FOR CANADA 



\Rice Lewis £» Son, Limited, Toronto. 



GEO. W. KORN RAZOR !PG. CO., 



V. S. A. 



64 



Want Ads. 



In this paper cost 2 cents per word first 
insertion, 1 cent per word subsequent in- 
sertions. Contractions count as one word, 
but five figures (such as $1,000) may pass 
as one word. Cash remittance to cover 
cost must in all cases accompany orders, 
otherwise we cannot insert the advertise- 
ment. When replies come in our care 5 
cents additional must be included for for- 
warding same. Many large business deals 
have been brought about through adver- 
tisements of 20 or 30 words. Clerks can be 
secured, articles sold and exchanged, at 
small expenditure. 

MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO., Limited 
Montreal and Toronto. 



SOLID STEEL SCISSORS 



Made in Canada and fully warra 




You will save money and give your customers better 
satisfaction by placing your cutlery orders with 

BAILEY CUTLERY CO., Limited 

—i nnnriTTTTrrr Ontario. 

Razors, Shears, Scissors, Tinners' Slips and Botcher Koines. 



Offirasia^ ...-.«■.. MEASURING TAPES 

Steel, Metallic, Linen, Pocket, tss Skin. 

Pat. Leather, Bend Leather, Etc, 

TARE THE BEST AND MOST POPULAR TAPES IN THE WORLD. 
YOUR STOCK IS NOT COMPLETE WITHOUT THEM. 

LUFKIN RULE CO., Saginaw, Mich, U.S.A. 

New York City Branch— 2S0 Broadway. 

For sale by ALL PROMINENT CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 




QUALITY FIRST AND ALWAYS." 



EAR SEEING 
PEOPLE 



are the most successful. Their perception of 
opportunities, where others see nothing, is the 
secret of success. Shrewd dealers find a splen- 
did opportunity in '* HURON " Stoves and 
Ranges for improving their profits. Those who 
have handled them ought to know. That they 
are still handling them proves that they do 
know. 

If you should try them you will 
know, too. 

IT IS A PROFITABLE 
AGENCY TO HAVE. 



The Western Foundry Co., limited. Wingham, Ont. 






Black Diamond File Works 

G. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve -<• ^ *- Medals 




Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 




► +*s+<*%s%, -**■%. -•* ■•>"%. ■%- %--%<<*^»>%.'%^%'»v«v»> "%^«5 



RUBBER HOSE 

FOR 

Water Air Suction 

Steam Acids Fire Protection 

Gas Brewers Pneumatic Tools 



UPERIOR IN QUALITY. 
lATISFACTORY IN SERVICE. 



"Redstone" Sheet Packing 

for High Pressures, 

Does not Burn out or Blow out and requires 
no following up. 



The Gutta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Co. 



OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Wareroome- 
45-47-49 West Front 8t. 



TORONTO, 



Factories— 1 16-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



CANADA. 



We have in stock the following metals and 
shall be pleased to quote you lowest market prices 
on application, viz. : — 

LEAD 

TIN 

COPPER 

SPELTER 

ANTIMONY 



B. & S. H. THOMPSON & CO. 



LIMITED 



53 St. Sulpice Street, 
MONTREAL. 

Dominion of Canada Sales Agents for American Sheet Steel 
Company and American Tin Plate Company. 



VARNISHES *wd JAPANS 

McCASKILL, DOUGALL & CO. 

Manufacturers MONTREAL 




Standard Railway and Carriage Varnishes 
Standard Boat and Spar Varnishes 

— Won't turn white from the effects of water and sun 

Standard Piano, Furniture and Decorative Varnishes 
Zanzerine Transparent Wood Finishes and Varnishes 
Architectural Varnishes 



OFFICES 



161 Summer St., 

BOSTON, Mass., U.S.A. 



30 St. John St., 

MONTREAL 



Classified List of Advertisements on page 59. 



Neithtr Fictitious nor Exorbitant 

Get LANGWELL'S BABBIT, MONTREAL. 



HARDWARE-METAL 

A WeeKly Newspaper devoted to the Hardware, Metal, Machinery, 
Heating' and Plumbing Trades in Canada. 



VOL. XVI. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JANUARY 23. 1904. 



NO. 4 




\ Trade- ^Ji!^ mark 

\ CUTLERY/ 



FOR SALE BY LEADINQ WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES. 



A QUE JT ION: 



If other brands are "just as good," why do 
level headed buyers willingly pay a little 
more for 

"QUEEN' J HEAD"? 



JOHN LYSAGHT. Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL 
BRISTOL, ENG Managers Canadian Branch 




Comparison is a Friend 
of " Safford ' Radiators. 



Compare the " Safford's ' seventeen years' 



piug. 



, i 



success with the record of 



any other Steam or Hot 7^**^ Radiator on 
the market to-day and you will find that 
the "Safford" is the gainer by the cqiw^ 
parison. 

Write us for particulars, if you have not 
yet received our Illustrated Catalogue. 



THE DOMINION RADIATOR CO., Limited 

Head Office and Works: DUFFERIN ST., TORONTO. 

BRANCHES: Montreal, Quebec, St. John, N.B., Winnipeg and Vancouver, B.C. 



A 



,',m:v 






JOSEPH R0D6ERS & SONS 

CUTLERY. 

TRADE (£•<£) MARK. 

WE HAVE RECEIVED A LARGE SHIPMENT OF JOSEPH RODGERS & SON'S CUTLERY 
AND CAN SHIP AT ONCE YOUR ORDERS. WRITE US FOR COMPLETE LIST OF GOODS, 
OR WE WILL BE PLEASED TO HAVE OUR TRAVELLERS CALL AND SHOW YOU SAMPLES. 




No. 22182-2-BLADE POCKET KNIVES 



Joseph Rodgers & Sons, 
Pocket Cutlery. 



Joseph Rodgers & Sons, 
Table Cutlery 




No. 33914 STAG HANDLE 3 BLADE KNIVES 



lIllHillliiiiil' 

No. 2066 

iVORIDE 
HANDLE 



Wo waiting for ijooJj>. we have a 
ri stock of cutlery ready 
to ship. 



P'CKET KNIVES I We ha * e ■»•»■ 
TABLE CU'LERY ' Hod e<"s*sons 

butcher knives,^. I l°r?c.\"! r £Z[ 



WRITE FOR TRADE PRICES 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



COR. KING AND VICTORIA STS., 



TORONTO. 



hardware and metal 



James Cartland &, Son 

Manufacturers of every description of Limited 

CABINET BUILDERS' FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND. 




London Showrooms : 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 



THE CANADIAN RUBBER CO. 

of Montreal. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



G 



Rubber Belting, 
Hose, Packing, 
Valves, Gaskets, 



ETC, ETC 



We make a specialty of 

HORSE SHOE PADS 

the best in the market. 



Write for Price* and Circular*. 



Head Office : : MONTREAL 

BRANCHES-TORONTO, WINNIPEG and VANCOUVER 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 




"YANKEE"" 
RATCHET SCREW DRIVER 
N2I5 




Oar "YANKEE" Tool Book 
tells all about them. Mailed 
free on application 



No. IS. "Yankee" Ratchet Sorew Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 




No. 30. "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




No. 41. " Yankee" Automatic Drill, Right Drill Points In Handle. 




Manufacturers also of 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chipper s. 
Fluting Machines, 

Hand Flitters. 



No. 50. "Yankee" Reciprocating Drill for Iron, Steel. Brass, Wood, etc. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 




No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 

Sorew Driver. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 

LIMITED 

Wholesale Hardware Merchants, 

OTTAWA, OIMT. 



■^ 



and 



Builders' 
Lumbermen's 
Contractors' Supplies 



A complete stock always on hand 
for prompt delivery. 

Enquiries solicited. Mail orders filled with 
dispatch. 




CLEANLINESS . 

There is no drip from the Russwin to soil clothing and 
floors. The gutter carries all juices to the dish — they are not 
deposited upon the floor. The machine itself is quickly cleaned 
with the least possible effort. Write for Booklets, Posters 
and Electrotypes to assist you. 



Russell & Erwin Mfg. Co. 

New Britain, Conn., U.S.A. 



GALVANIZED 

SHEETS 

From stock or for import 



M.& L SAMUEL, BENJAMIN & CO. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 

27 Wellington St. West, -^TORONTO, ONT. • 

EUROPEAN HOUSE 16 PHILPOT LANE, LONDON, ENQ. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ti 



fflMifii'ii^' 





No. 1 D Conqueror Swage 



I DISSTON'S SAW SETS I 



Best for the Mechanic to Use. 
Best for the Dealer to Sell. 







No. 9 Monarch Saw Set 



-MADE BY- 



No. 3D 
Conqueror Swage. 



HENRY DISSTON & SONS, 

SAW AND TOOL MANUFACTURERS, 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 




No. 2D f*% 
Conqueror Swage. J, 




No. OD Conqueror Swage. 



Quote 
Low. 



Address all communications to 
Montreal. 



-SOLD BY 

Bros 

WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS. 
TORONTO, OTTAWA, VANCOUVER, MONTREAL. 



Ship 
[Quick. 



Prompt shipments our 
hobby. 



Hardware and metal 



Binder Twine 



650 feet per pound 
600 



BLUE RIBBON, 

RED CAP, 

TIGER, 550 

GOLDEN CROWN, 500 

STANDARD, 500 

SISAL, 500 



Blue Ribbon is no doubt the Queen of Binder 
Twine. It runs six hundred and fifty feet to the pound, 
and is manufactured from most select Manila Fibre. Six 
hundred and fifty foot Twine is the only Twine manu- 
factured entirely from Manila Fibre. Dealers should 
beware of so-called "Manila" Twines which are advertised 
to measure less than 650 feet to the pound. They are 
mixed Twines. 



Write for samples. 



Consumers Cordage Company, Limited 



Halifax, N. S. 



Montreal, Que, 



CARRIAGE \ND SADDLERY HARDWARE 



Hard-ware and 
Metal 



It's handy to use our brown and 

manilla 

Wrapping Papers 

because they have strength and 
durability essential to satisfac- 
tory wrapping papers. Full 
weight and full count in every 
order. 

CANADA PAPER CO. 

Limited 
Toronto, Montreal and Windsor Mills, Que. 




c COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy.N.Y 

Auto Screw Jack 



Harness Snaps Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 



FOR SALE BV JOBBERS AT MFRS. PRICS 



(( 



THE PEERLESS" 



is the best Bolster Spring ever produced. A fine 
line for the hardware trade. Write Us for Prioei 




^ 



c^goi 



cf 



JAMES WARNOCK & CO., 



GALT, ONT. 



We desire to call your attention to some of our specialties which are handled extensively 

by the general hardware trade. 



Horse Blankets (aii kinds) 
Rubber and Oiled Knee Rugs 



Burlington-Stay-on Blankets 
Plush and Woollen Knee Rugs 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 



lft*U-.-.<i " 1 



&te 




Largest Variety, 

Toilet, Hand, Electric Power? 

ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Sheep-Shearing Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

SENS FOE CATALOGUE TO 
t American Shearer Mfg. Co., Nashua, N.H..CSA 




Oneida Community Goods 

HALTERS, COW TIES, SNAPS, ate, etc.. 

In all sizes and styles. Maybe had of all 
jobbers throughout Canada. 

Faotory— NIAGARA FALLS, OUT 



"Just as good" is not Solarine. 
For 1904— Buy 

SOLARINE 

£ e h st ery METAL POLISH 

Order through your Jobber, or write 

SOLARINE DEPOT, 60 George St, TORONTO 



If you handle the above, it will be of interest to you to write us. 

Samue! Trees & Co., Toronto. 



The Trees, Sprtggs Co., Limited, 

Winnipeg, Man. 

Importers and Manufacturers of Saddlery Goods 




may profitably carry, because 
They are coming in by dozens 



HIS TROUBLES. 

A horse's hoof troubles are not of his own 
making. He does not go lame because be has 
lameness in his blood. Medicines will not cure 
lameness. You may sell an article for the soles 
of a horse's hoofs that will prevent many kinds 
of lameness and cure most kinds. 

The Dunlop Improved 

"Ideal" Horseshoe Pad 

affords the most practical means obtainable to- 
day for saving the progress of all forms of 
lameness. It is the only thing for navicular 
disease. These pads are something that you 

we will be delighted to turn our orders over to you. 

with every mail. 



Write for "Horseology," the cleverest trade booklet of the season. Trade prices on application. 



THE DUNLOP TIRE CO., Limited, 
TORONTO, CANADA. 



Agencies: Montreal, St. John, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 




^ 




retty Cold Winter ! 

A FINE ONE FOR 



ARCTIC BUFFALO ROBES. 

Not too late yet for you to stock a dozen or so. These robes are right as to price, 
as to serviceableness. They look well and wear well. They are moth proof. Send in 
an order for a sample lot, any quantity. 



Berlin Robe & Clothing Co., 

Berlin, Ontario. 



LIMITED 



J 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



WIRE 



I DO YOU 
HANDLE 



R 

E 



WIRE? 



WE MANUFACTURE AND SELL 
ALL KINDS OF WIRE : 

Hay Baling Wire. 
Oiled and Annealed Wire. 
Plain Galvanized Fence Wire. 
Galvanized Hard Coiled 

Spring Wire. 

In carloads, or less than carloads. 
WRITE FOR PRICES. 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO. 

LIMITED 

HAMILTON, OIMT. 



FENCING 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. 



LIMITED 




Plain Twist 
2 Wires. 



35211)8. per mile 
t|J\ 384 His. permjle 

352 I hs. per mil 
384 Dps. per mile 

^j 288 lbs .per mile 



Coiled SPRING Galvanized Fence. 
BRIGHT and GALVANIZED FENCE STAPLES, 

\% to 2 INCHES. 



ANN 



Wl 



FOR BALING 



HAY — PULP — PAPER RAGS - SHINGLES-ETC. 

" BUY «<!► GOODS 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York 

Empire Building 



Montreal 

N. Y. Life Building 



Chicago 

The Rookery 



BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED PLAIN WIRE 

PLAIN TWIST CABLE FENCING 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire; Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of 
every description; Rail Bonds, Bale Ties, Special Wires for all 
purposes, Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold-drawn Steel 

Shafting. 

— DO IT NOW= 



Buy 

True 
Brand 




Fencing 
Plyers 



BEST GOODS 



RIOI1T PRICES 



E. F. WALTER & CO., I66 £« Montreal 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



;; 55 ":' the GEO. B. MEADOWS 

Toronto Wire, Iron an Brass Works Company, Limited. 
Manufiicturersof Wire Window Guards, Wire Cloth 
Moulders' Kiddles, Children's Cots, Bank and Office 
Railings, Ornamental Iron Fencing, Window Fix- 
tures, Wire Work, Architectural Wrought Iron 
Work 

117 King St. West, TORONTO, ONT, 



gg 


ss 


g 


Coal Screens 




Sand Screens 






Ash Screens 






J)ennis Wire & 


111 






Iron Co., 

LONDON, Ont. 


1 


New Catalogue ready Feb. 
1904. Send in your name. 



The Town Band 

has some instruments that would 
be made as good as new if re-plated. 

I am a specialist on this class 
of work. 

Solicit the business and give it 
to me. 

Money for the two of us in the 
job — without robbery. 

D.SUTHERLAND 

Electro-Plater, 
11? Church Street, - - TORONTO 



I 



INI 



I 



FOR IRON 



-'.. . Ou'SP^'aKjes are British and Foreign Iron and Steel, Metals, Bars, Plates, Sheets, Bolts 
ami Nuts, Tin Plates, etc. 

.... W JS are sole L 'c e, >cees for Page's Patent Wire Stretcher and also for Ironside's Patent 
Wire Cutters. 

We Publish Monthly a "CANADIAN METAL PRICE LIST," giving quotations In Dollars and Cents 

■CI I , 1. also -'WKEKL.Y MARKET KKFORT." 

Lei us have your name and address for ' PRICE LIST' and "MARKET REPORT." 

IRONSIDE, SON & CH^SS^E^m. 



London, England. 




G. A. Crosby & Co. of Ontario, 



SARNIA, ONT. 



LIMITED 



Manufacturers of~ 



Patent Automatic Can Making Machinery, Presses, 
Dies and Special Machinery for Working Sheet Metal 

H. W. Petrie, 141-145 Front Street West, TORONTO- Selling Agent. 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON -EJECTING 



12, 16 and 20 Guage. 
Steel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
Take Down 
Cun Made 




Made in 1 widths 
'■ I and 1 in. 



Improved Trojan Box Strapping. 





Self-drawing Strapping. 



ETURNEtf 

R -« m/ 



Packed in cases of 20 reels, 
300 feet each. 




Box Board Fasteners. 



Clutch Nails for Corners. 




I'sed in place 01" tongue and groove, also forshooks. 

Shingle Bands; 
Hoop Iron, Gal. and Plain. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE. 




J. N. WARMINTON 



43 Scott St., 

TORONTO. 



207 St. James St., 

MONTREAL 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




SOCIAL STEEL 

_i OUND4S CANADA. 





Mndas Axes 

are made in Canada, and by long ex- 
perience have been specially adapted for 
the Canadian chopper. 

There are none better finished. 

There are none of better quality. 

There are none will retail better. 

Our travellers are out with samples, 
it will pay you to see the value we offer, 
and we stand by our goods. 



DUNDAS AXE WORKS, 

DUNDAS, CANADA. 



DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 




a 



ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA. 

Maxwell Favorite Churn" Lawn Mowers. 



PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever 
Drive, and Detachable Driving Link. Improved 
for season of 1904. Steel or Wood Frame as 



desired. 



Wheelbarrows. 



In Four Different Sizes. 



Steel Frame Chum 



High and Low Wheels.from 
12 in. to 20 in. widths. Cold 
Rolled Steel Shafting, Cru- 
cible Steel Knives and Cutting Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you these 
articles 

SEND DIRECT TO US. 



"THE MAXWELL" 

Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches 



MAXWELL MOWER 

8-inch Low Wheel. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



Canadian Cordage 

& MFG. Co., Limited. 

BINDER TWINE. 






"ROYAL" MANILA, 650 ft. 
"ROYAL" MANILA, 600 ft. 
"ROYAL" MANILA, 550 ft. 
"ROYAL" MANILA, 500 ft. 
STANDARD, - 500 ft. 
SISAL, - - 500 ft. 



to the pound, 
to the pound, 
to the pound, 
to the pound, 
to the pound, 
to the pound. 



Our " ROYAL " Brand of Binder Twine is manufactured of the finest raw material that 
can be obtained, and with the utmost care. For length and strength we have no competitors. 
Our Twine is manufactured with the latest machinery, and dealers desiring to have exclusive 
agencies should apply at once. Will name lowest prices, or will enter contracts without price 
named until The International Harvester Co. announces prices. 



Wire, Write or 'Phone. 

CANADIAN CORDAGE & HFG. CO., Limited 

Peterborough, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



it 



WOODYATT "« STAR 




WOODYATT MOWER 

Patented throughout the world. 



Lawn Mowers 



These high-grade wheels are known in every 
land, and are constructed of the very best ma- 
terial that money can buy, with simple adjust- 
ments, and easy to operate. 




Improved in many parts, and guaranteed. 
Sold only through the Wholesale Trade. 

TAYLOR FORBES COMPANY, 

LIMITED 

Branch — 9 De Bresoles Street, Head Office, 

Montreal, Que. Guel|>h, Ont. 

THE LARGEST AND BEST EQUIPPED HRADWARE FACTORY IN CANADA. 

THE BEST RESULTS ALWAYS FOLLOW THE SALE AISD USE OF 



KEMP'S 



BROAD HOOP ROLL RIM 
BOTTOM MILK CAN TRIMMINGS 





A criticising public have used them for the past five years and the increasing 
demand is proof of their superiority, also evidence of the satisfaction 
which they give 

The Roll Rim Bottom having no sharp turns does not break the grain of the 
metal or lessen its wearing qualities. 

Narrow Top Hoops can be supplied in place of Broad Top Hoops if desired- 

For Strength, Durability and Finish our Trimmings are unexcelled. 

They cost no more than inferior qualities. 

We also carry in stock a full line of First Quality Tinned Iron, cut suit- 
able for the different size of Trimmings, which we will supply at the 
lowest current market quotations. 

KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO, CANADA. 

10 




Classified List of Advertisements on Page 59. 



Hardware and 
Metal 



nrf^Xta^^^***^*)***^*) 



RETAIL HARDWAREMEN SHOULD ORGANIZE 



•n-*»/tyW» 



D 



URING January and February 
the retail hardware trade of 
Canada have probably more 
time for solid, practical 
thinking, than at any other 
season of the year. Doubtless this op- 
portunity will be taken advantage of by 
(he great majority of them to perfect 
their plans for the coming year. Stores 
will be enlarged, remodelled, or re- 
arranged ; advertising campaigns will be 
studied out, a full consideration of new 
lines suggested will be given, and those 
thought likely to yield fair returns will 
be added to the stock-in-trade. In 
every way the progressive merchant will 
"prepare for war in times of peace." 

Yet, while the hardwaremen have in 
the past perfected their plans for im- 
proving and extending their individual 
business, they have not yet taken up a 
consideration which is every year be- 
coming more pressing — the need of 
organization within the trade. 

The day for bitterness, jealousy and 
meanness between business rivals has 
gone by, has been superseded by a spirit 
of organization, which has completely 
revolutionized business methods in many 
branches of trade. Combines, trusts, 
consolidations and pools on the one 
hand and a widespread development of 
trade unions have created new condi- 
tions, which affect all classes of people, 
the consuming public in particular, and 
various business interests in particular. 

Moreover, in Canada the manufactu- 
rers in many lines have gotten together 
and formed associations to control the 
selling prices of their products. It is 
worth recording in the connection that 
up to date these associations have been 
conducted along fair, legitimate lines. 

The wholesale hardware dealers of the 
Dominion have, however, found it ad- 
visable to organize the "Wholesale 
Hardware Association" to protect their 
interest. 

The fact that the relations between 
the manufacturers and the wholesale 
dealers are even more cordial than pre- 
vious to the organization of the various 
associations, is one of the strongest 
proofs of their practical suitability for 
the ends they were called into being to 
effect. It has been possible for repre- 
sentative manufacturers and jobbers to 
meet, to thresh out their differences in 
a more or less friendly way, and to ul- 
timately come to an understanding 



which is satisfactory in large measure 
to both parties. 

Naturally, however, in these consulta- 
tions the interests of the retailers will 
not be uppermost in the minds of either 
parties. Thus has been created a condi- 
tion which calls for organization by the 
retail hardware trade of Canada. 

Prominent members of both manufac- 
turers' and wholesalers' associations in 
Canada have united in the expression of 
opinion that the retailers could serve 
their own interests to- better advantage 
and could simplify their relations with 
the other branches of the trade by 
organizing. 

In the United States all three branch- 
es of the trade are organized. At the 
recent convention of the Wholesale Hard- 
ware Association of the "United States, 
held at Atlantic City, the speech which 
attracted most widespread attention 
was one by Mr. Bogardus, president of 
the Retailers' Association (This address 
was j< produced in "Hardware and 
Metal" at the time). In other ways 
the presence of retailers at the whole- 
salers' convention was of real value to 
both branches represented. The same 
service could be given in Canada. The 
wholesalers and manufacturers are fair 
enough to recognize the rights of the re- 
tailer and wise enough to consider his 
interests. Yet they themselves have 
seen the need of representation from the 
retail trade if the most satisfactory re- 
sults are to be secured. 

Throughout the United States the 
retail trade has become excellently 
organized. The parent body is the 
National Retail Hardware Dealers' As- 
sociation. In addition to this there 
have been many state organizations. To 
the secretaries of a few of these "Hard- 
ware and Metal" has written, asking if 
the associations had been found to be of 
real service. A couple of the replies 
received will be allowed to speak for 
themselves : 

Editor Hardware and Metal — 

Your favor to band and am pleased 10 comply 
with your request. Enclosed herewith I hand you 
a copy of our constitution and by-laws, also appli- 
cation blank and membership card. The first 
good results which we obtained from our state 
organization was the formation of a local organiza- 
tion in this city, which has proved beneficial in 
securing better feeling among the dealers, better 
prices for our goods, and more satisfactory service 
to the general public. Our organization here has 
not tended to make competition any less brisk, 

11 



but all of the dealers have more regard for the 
rights of other people. 

Our meetings help to place things on a more 
equitable basis, as all questions are brought up in 
the meetings, thoroughly discussed, and are settled 
by a majority vote. This same condition applies 
to small towns where there are sometimes not 
more than two dealers. 

The advantages which we offer our members 
consist in securing more consideration from 
the railroad company, more consideration from 
the jobbers, anB more consideration from the 
manufacturers, by reason of our affiliation with 
the National Association. 

The local organizations are not affiliated with 
state associations, but we have found that the state 
association promoted local organizations, an' 
better results can be obtained by local organizations 
through state associations, and more recognition 
received by state associations by reason of their 
affiliation with the National. 

The above are only a few of the minor benefits, 
and if you are successful in perfecting an associ- 
ation of hardware dealers in the province of 
Ontario, we will be glad to give you all possible 
help' in securing such benefits as are hel ful to 
this business. 

H. J. Hall, 

Secretary of The Nebraska Retail 
Hardware Dealers' Association. 
Lincoln, Nebraska, U.S.A. 

* • • 
Editor Hardware And Metal,— 

Replying to your favor regarding operation of 
our State Association, I am pleased to enclose you 
herewith a copy of our by-laws, constitution and 
roll of members. We claim that in a union of any 
kind there is strength, and this is one point I 
have made a special effort of to keep before our 
members. 

We offer no inducements to the hardware deal- 
ers of Ohio further than that we will take care of all 
such reasonable complaints against manufacturers 
and jobbers that hurt retail trade. We make a 
special effort to have interesting programmes for 
our conventions. These programmes consist of 
papers or talks on subjects pertaining to our busi- 
ness. 

D. R. Burr, 
Corresponding Secretary Ohio ]\ 
Hardware Association. 

Piqua, Ohio, U.S.A. 

• » • 

It will be seen from the above that in 
the two states, Ohio and Nebraska, good 
work is being done. This is evidently 
the case in several other states as f al- 
as can be judged from the reports of tl - 
conventions and from the letters from 
those connected with them. 

"Hardware and Metal" is convinced 
that there is a general desire on the 
part of many retailers to have such an 
association established. If you have 
any opinion on the subject, send it in 
for publication. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



OUTLOOK FOR BRITISH COLUMBIA LEAD 

INDUSTRY. 

Written for Hardware and Metal by Henry Sherwood, C.E., Sutter Creek, Amador Co., Cal. 



THE lead industry in British Col- 
umbia has been dependant on the 
American Smelting and Refining 
Trust for treatment of ores, the plants 
in Britsh Columbia being totally inade- 
quate for handling the desired output 
from the mines. Through the refining 
being chiefly done in the United States 
the manufacturing of all lead products, 
other than metallic lead, has been nil, 
causing large imports to the Dominion 
of white lead and colors, whilst these 
goods could be produced in British Col- 
umbia and laid down in the consuming 
cities of Canada at much lower prices 
than imported goods, and of the very 
highest quality, were the necessary plant 
erected. 

The prices of these manufactured 
goods depend upon the prices paid to 
the lead mines for their ores by the 
smelters. The United States tariff pre- 
vents lead and its products from enter- 
ing there. Therefore the London mar- 
ket price (less freight) will continue the 
standard of lead prices in British Col- 
umbia. This has averaged £11 17s. 3d. 
per ton for 20 past years— 1903 being 
about 9s. per ton below average. The 
present price of about £11 2s. 6d. (less 
freight) brings the soft leads in British 
Columbia to $41.75— on which are 
smelting and refining charges of about 
$34 on the pig lead produced; leaving 
the value received by the miner under 
$10 per ton of lead contained in the ore. 
The future prices of lead cannot be ex- 
pgeted to range higher than the past 
London average. 

To consume her lead the role of Brit- 
ish Columbia is plainly not to send her 
metallic lead in any form to Eastern 
Canada, because the mines of Ontario 
can do this with half the freight cost. 
But the sea] torts bordering the Pacific 
ocean have become large purchasers of 
lead, especially China and Japan. These 
with India take also much thin tea lead. 
Also the Pacific ports of Mexico, Cent- 
ral and South America take metallic 
leads, and all take a considerable aggre- 
gate weight of white lead and colors, 
which arc now chiefly supplied by San 
Francisco manufacturers, at prices from 
$40 to $65 a ton higher than the same 
goods can be sent out from Vancouver; 
which port has equal transport facili- 
ties with San Erancisco. In conse- 
quence of the lower prices at which all 



the leads and products can be sent out, 
this whole Pacific trade belongs of right 
to Vancouver. Again, the climate of 
the Pacific coast is most favorable to 
chemical and color making through the 
whole year; making and drying being 
able to proceed without interruption or 
damage. White lead and all paint col- 
ors can be supplied from British Colum- 
bia to Eastern Canada of distinctly 
superior qualities and at lower prices 
than can ever be made there. The role 
of British Columbia is therefore to treat 
her own ores, to supply metallic leads 
to all Pacific ports, to manufacture all 
leacl products and supply them to the 
markets of the Dominion as well as to 
Pacific ports. For all these operations, 
the Pacific coast of British Columbia 
offers great economy, such as cannot 
elsewhere be found. Power and fuel at 
excessively low prices; natural chemi- 
cals at hand and delivered on salt water 
at your door; rail and steamship to 
every consuming market; raw materials 
all at home, at prices unequalled any- 
where ; facilities for reducing and re- 
fining metals bringing the cost to the 
very lowest limits— being chiefly cost of 
power and fuel, and this feature will 
itself ensure the supply of ores to be 
always large, at prices elsewhere im- 
possible. 

All large businesses are most healthy 
grown from small beginnings. Eastern 
Canada can now take 5 to 10 tons of 
white lead a day, irrespective of lead 
colors— provided that the quality be 
high class, and that the prices laid down 
in Montreal, Toronto, etc., be lower than 
imports of equal grade. The manufac- 
ture of these will form a safe nucleus 
for a future business, and pay an ample 
constant dividend on capital employed, 
from the first day of operation, thus al- 
lowing gradual extension and erection 
of plant without loss by delay. In com- 
mencing the business, in order to get 
rapidly into work, pig lead would prob- 
ably he first employed, with smaller 
profit whilst refining plant were erect- 
ing. Whilst thus acting, the white lead 
could be put on board ship or railway 
at $2 per 100 lbs., against the wholesale 
exports from San Francisco of $6.50 
(costing them about $5), or the same 
laid clown in Montreal or Toronto at a 
cost of $3.05 per 100 lbs. dry white lead. 
The London market price for refined 
12 



soft lead is $41.75 f.o.b. in place of San 
Francisco price of $90. These contrasts 
of figures are given merely to show the 
possibilities for profitable business in 
British Columbia and the magnitude of 
a business conducting its own reducing 
and refining of metals. 

The writer is an English manufactur- 
ing and mining engineer, 30 years con- 
versant with the lead industry and color 
making, has during two years past sifted 
the whole situation in British Columbia 
and spent last summer in Bi'itsh Colum- 
bia preparing the way for establishing 
such a business; securing valuable salt- 
water frontage on Burrard Inlet with 
railway facilities, and obtaining desired 
privileges. Capital can be obtained 
partly in San Francisco and Vancouver 
to co-operate with Eastern Canadian 
manufacturers, who are desirous to in- 
vest; especially of consumers of such 
products, one of whom would be desired 
to take the commercial management, 
paying and receiving all moneys, whilst 
the writer builds up the plant, for re- 
ducing and refining ores, and manufac- 
turing required products. He will be 
in Vancouver early in the Spring (D.V.) 
to commence the plant to supply the 
Summer demand of Eastern Canada for 
white lead, etc. 

The business may be expected to grow 
to a magnitude ranking with the largest 
and leaving nothing to be further de- 
sired in its ample and permanent divi- 
dends. 

CHANGE IN MANAGEMENT. 

Harlan P. Hubbard, who opened a 
sales agency at Toronto, Ontario, a 
little over a year ago for E. C. Atkins 
& Co. in order to serve their growing 
trade in Canada to better advantage, 
has been called to a sphere of greater 
usefulness with his firm and made gen- 
eral superintendent of the immense fac- 
tories at Indianapolis, Indiana. Mr. 
Hubbard was wonderfully successful in 
his work in Canada, but his superior 
qualifications in the practical end of the 
business of necessity resulted in his ad- 
vancement. He began his new duties 
on Januarv 1 being succeeded in Toron- 
to by C. D. Ten Eyck, of Detroit, 
Mich., a gentleman of fine address and 
pleasing personality, who will undoubt- 
edly meet with a cordial reception from 
the trade and continue the work so aus- 
piciously begun. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment* 



The ONTARIO TACK CO 

Limited 
HAMILTON OHT. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

Hardware and Metal would be pleased to review 
catalogues, booklets or other such publications issued 
by manufcturers or wholesale dealers selling to the 
hardware, plumbing, machinery or metal trades. Re- 
tailers desiring such publications may also have inserted 
a note to that effect. No charge will be made for these 
services. 

SUTTON & SONS' SEEDS. 

Sutton & Sons, Reading, Eng., have 
issued several publications which will be 
useful to hardware dealers in all parts 
of Canada, Seeds are recognized as a 
profitable line for hardwaremen, while 
Sutton & Sons are recognized as among 
the foremost seed dealers of the world. 
One of their publications is " Sutton's 
Farmers' Year Book and Graziers' Man- 
ual," in which is full information re- 
garding the seed lines. Another is 
" Sutton's Amateur's Guide in Horti- 
culture for 1904," containing informa- 
tion regarding vegetable and flower seeds 
and various supplies necessary for gard- 
ening. In addition to these books is a 
publication for the use of the trade con- 
taining terms and information for im- 
porters of seeds. Readers of " Hard- 
ware and Metal " desiring any or all 
of these booklets can secure same by 
mentioning this paper. They are well 
worth writing for. 



MOFFAT STOVE CALENDARS. 

The Moffat Stove Co., Weston, Ont., 
have this year a calendar which for real 
artistic merit would be hard to excel. 
On a stiff grey board background is a 
three-color engraving of a typical Scot- 
tish scene, an aged man and woman sit- 
ting by their fireside. The scene is en- 
titled " John" Anderson, My Jo," and 
below it is the much loved poem by 
Burns on that subject. The printing 
and the calendar pad are in colors which 
harmonize fully with the engraving. 
" Hardware and Metal " readers can 
secure this fine work on application. 




A Question of Profit. 

Profit in business lies in getting people to come back again, and again — 
and again to your store. There's no profit in the first sale. 

The only way to get them to come back is to give them something good — 
something they will remember and talk about. The secret of success in business 
is 'value, and letting people know about it. 

Value — high quality — is the foundation stone of the success of The Sherwin- 
Williams Paints and The Sherwin-Williams Varnishes. They have in them 
the quality that brings a customer back again, and again, and again. 

And behind them, pushing them to the front — moving them from the deal- 
er's shelves — is the strongest, most effective selling and advertising organization 
in the paint world. 

You, if you are a Sherwin-Williams Paint Agent, are not doing justice 
to your business or to yourself if you are not handling the Full Line. 

If you are an ordinary paint dealer, you will not know what paint success 
means until you learn what the Full Line means. 

Write us today for full information. 

Wthe Sherwin-Williams Co., paint and varnish makers. 

CANADIAN DIVISION 

Headquarters and Factories, 21 St. Antoine St., Montreal, Que. 
1149 Depots, Toronto and Winnipeg. 



. 



DAN PATCH, 1.50 ' 4 . 

A horse of good proportions is a thing 
of beauty, and has charms which attract 
general admiration. Dan Patch, the 
champion harness horse of the world, is 
well proportioned as well as speedy and 
is in consequence a great favorite. His 
owners, the International Stock Food 
Co., Minneapolis and Toronto, have had 
a half-sheet lithograph of this fine ani- 
mal taken, which will be sent free to any 
reader of " Hardware and Meal " who 
makes application at once. 

THE B. GREENING WIRE CO. 

The B. Greening Wire Co., Hamilton, 
are again offering the trade a handsome 
calendar. The calendar pad is com- 
posed of large-sized letters which can 
readily be seen across a room. Above 
it are views of the company's works at 
Hamilton, also the founders of the com- 
pany and the present president, S. 0. 
Greening. Beneath the pad are several 
valuable tables of weights and measures 
of service to users of and dealers in 
metals. 



LUCAS PAINT. 

John Lucas & Co., New York, are also 
sending out a serviceable - calendar, the 
dates on which can easily be read at a 
distance. The pads are printed in white 
on a green (Lucas green presumably) 
background. The scene depicted is 
Washington's headquarters, a_ fine type 
of colonial mansion. These calendai's 
can be had on application. 



It would be difficult to conceive of a 
more comprehensive range of saws than 
is described in a 200-page cloth-bound 
book issued by E. C. Atkins & Co., In- 
dianapolis, Ind., and Toronto. Includ- 
ing in this range are circular and wab- 
ble saws, circular knives, corner box 
cutters, inserted tooth saws, band saws, 
gang and drag saws, pit saws, stave 
saws, ice saws cross-cut, with and with- 
out handle, wood saws, hand, panel and 
rip saws, carpenters', plumbers', butcher 
and hack saws, saw repairs, tools, etc., 
floor, bench and wall scrapers, corn and 
cane knives, vegetable slicers, plaster- 



ing trowels, hammers, swages, shapers, 
glimmers, grinders, files, brazing tables, 
clamps, saw filing and patching machines, 
guages, guards. The trade will readily 
recognize the importance of this publi- 
cation. It is printed on excellent paper 
and is full of first-class illustrations, so 
it must have been issued at large ex- 
pense. Copies of the work will, how- 
ever, be sent free to readers of "Hard- 
ware and Metal " who request it in 
good time. 

GURNEY'S DESK CALENDAR. 

The Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto, 
etc., have issued a calendar which is 
quite distinct from anything else re- 
ceived by " Hardware and Metal " this 
week. It is a desk calendar, consisting 
of a pad enclosed in a board frame to 
stand on the desk. It is not too large 
for an ordinary desk, yet is so large thai 
the dates can be readily distinguished. 
These are not for promiscuous distribu- 
tion, so "Hardware and Metal'" readers 
should use their own stationery when 
requesting one. 



13 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



NEW BRITISH STANDARD OF 
WEIGHTS. 

(From U. S. Consul Boyle, Liverpool, Eny.J 

THE British Government has taken 
the first step toward the adoption 
of the decimal system of weights. 
It has just been announced by the Board 
of Trade that, under a special order in 
council, it will sanction the use of a 
weight of 50 pounds, instead of the pres- 
ent standards of 112 pounds (called a 
hundredweight) and 56 pounds (called 
a half hundredweight). The 50 pounds 
is by this action made a legal standard 
of weight. This reform has been adopt- 
ed after forty years of agitation by 
Liverpool merchants and later on by 
petitions to the Government by the 
Chambers of Commerce throughout the 
country, and particularly by the Cham- 
ber of Commerce of this city. Liver- 
pool has felt the necessity for the change 
more than any other city, as this is the 
leading entrepot for American and col- 
onial produce of bulk, the weighing of 
which is a considerable item in the 
handling and, indeed, in the ultimate 
cost of the shipments. More cotton, 
corn, provisions, and tobacco are im- 
ported into Liverpool than into any 
other city in the world, and by far the 
largest proportion of these imports come 
from the United States; so the United 
States is peculiarly interested in the re- 
form just instituted. The Liverpool 
Journal of Commerce comments approv- 
ingly as follows: 

'-' All these great quantities are cal- 
culated by the American sellers in 
pounds avoirdupois, but by the British 
buyers they have had to be counted in 
hundredweights, quarters, and pounds, 
in accordance with our antiquated and 
absurd and anomalous system of weights. 
What is the consequence? To give a 
concrete example : The buyer wishes to 
ascertain, say, the weight of 100 pounds 
of tobacco; to do so the nearest weight 
he can employ is a quarter, or 56 pounds, 
Id which must be added smaller weights 
until the exact quantity is ascertained. 
But two 50-pound weights will give him 
the exact amount at once; three will 
give him the weight of 150 pounds, four 
200 rounds, and so on, smaller weights 
being used for fractions of 50 pounds. 
The consequence is an enormous simpli- 
fication of calculation. It should be re- 
membered that the men who weigh these 
materials at the docks are not, as a rule, 
mathematicians who can tell the time 
of day by algebra. They are largely 
day laborers, who have not had a super- 
ior education, and to weigh quantities 
with a sot of weights necessitating the 




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calculation of fractions of pounds, and 
thereby the use of dozens of small 
weights, necessitates a mental effort of 
which all are not capable, and the use 
of a multiplicity of weights which con- 
fuses them, leads to errors and loss of 
time— and time is money. But by the 
adoption of a 50-pound weight a unit of 
calculation has been obtained which will 
sweep away a whole set of weights, pre- 
vent errors, and save confusion, time 
and money. It should be remembered 
that the present complicated and Avaste- 
ful method of calculating weights has to 
be gone through four times— first, when 
the goods are warehoused ; second, by 
the customs, for the purpose of dutv; 
third, in the counting-house; and fourth, 
in the factory— and in all these cases 
the same cumbrous system of calcula- 
tion by hundredweights, quarters, and 
nounds has to be gone through, and the 
loss of time, convenience, and money 
(uiadrupled. But by the adoption of a 
50-pound weight, though four separate 
calculations will still be necessary, they 
can be done simply and quickly. The 
saving in bookkeeping will alone be 
great. The present system necessitates 
a maze of figures of different denomin- 
ations; but by their reducton to the one 
common denomiriatof of pounds weight 

14 



whole columns of figures will be saved 
and the risk of mistakes minimized." 

Americans have great difficulty in 
understanding the English system of 
weights— almost as much as they en- 
counter in trying to understand the 
English fractional system of coinage. 
For instance, if you ask a man here 
how much he weighs he will tell you, 
say, " 11 stone 7." A " stone " is 14 
pounds; so 11 stone would be 154 
pounds, and adding the extra 7 pounds 
the weight given would be 161 pounds. 
Even Englishmen " to the manner 
born " have to make a mental calcula- 
tion in arriving at the result in pounds 
in such a case. Sometimes provisions 
and other articles are sold at so much 
a stone, and then if the quantity pur- 
chased weighs a few odd pounds over a 
stone or a number of stones the pur- 
chaser and seller have to figure out the 
price per pound. It is the hope and ex- 
pectation that the results from the 
adoption of the new standard weight of 
50 pounds will be so satisfactory that 
(before |long 'the old-fashioned " hun- 
dredweight " of 112 pounds will be en- 
tirely abolished along with the stone, 
and that a decimal fractional system of 
5 pounds, 10 pounds, and 25 pounds will 
come into general use. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



LIMITED 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



37-39 West Front Street, Toronto. 
i_ lj rvi o e: f? ivi e: im s supplies. 



ONLY 
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FOR OTHER LINES SEE OUR HARDWARE CATALOGUE. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. um,*d. Toronto. 



OUR prices are right 



GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST. 

Faolory: DufTerln Street, Toronto 

15 



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Hard-ware and 
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A TALE ABOUT SCALES 



NEARLY A CENTURY AGO A GRIST MILL OWNER 

named Thaddeus Fairbanks, having considerable weigh- 
ing to do in connection with his mill, and at that time 
having only the old style even balance for this purpose, 
conceived the idea of a platform scale, upon which the 
goods to be weighed could be conveniently placed or 
over which a load of grain could be weighed all at once. 
He put his ideas into execution which resulted in the 
building of the first platform scale. Knowing the value 
of this invention, this style of scale was at once patented 
and a factory was opened for the manufacture of this new 
discovery. Years have gone by since then and when- 
ever inventive genius or skill can suggest any improve- 
ments these are at once embodied in Fairbanks' Standard 
Scales which are to-day universally recognized as the 



A Fairbanks' Scale 
"Serves You Right." 




"STANDARD Of THE WORLD." 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 



HE FAIRBANKS OOMRAINY 

MONTREAL. TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 



16 



Hardware and 
Metal 




THE DEVELOPMENT OF WATER POWER. 



W 



ITH the fast disappear- 
ance of Canadian prim- 
eval forests and the de- 
nuding of her coal 
measures, the question 
of economy in the use of fuel has as- 
sumed more and more importance, since, 
when the results of our extravagances 
are apparent all around us, we have be- 
gun to look at the future with some ap- 
prehension. However, perhaps this ap- 
prehension is not at all necessary. So 
far as our heat, light and power go there 
is little to be feared, since nature has 
provided three great forces, water falls, 
tides and winds, all of which present un- 
limited scope for investigation for the 
application of them to generate energy 
which may be transmitted and applied 
to produce light, heat and motive power. 

Of the three, water falls present 
more desirable features than the other 
two, and for that reason are being de- 
veloped to a much greater extent. Wind 
and tide are intermittent, but the stream 
or river keeps up its continual flow. Of 
course water as a motive power has long 
been used to serve man's purposes, and 
in Canada a large proportion of streams 
and rivers have been utilized as a mo- 
tive power in their immediate vicinity. 

With the advances in electric trans- 
mission of energy the field of usefulness 
of falling water has widened and wid- 
ened. 

Next to the muscular and animate 
forces of nature, water was the first to 
be utilised as a motive power, the rea- 
sons lor which being that power de- 
velopment from it, requires no compli- 
cated machinery and that it has proved 
itself the cheapest and most direct 
source of energy to be commanded. Win- 
then, if that is true, has improvement 
in the methods of development come so 
slowly? There are various reasons, the 
best of which is probably that before it 
was known that energy might be con- 
veyed by the electric current, the field 
of its application was very limited Then 
the steam engine was invented which 
supplied the deficiencies of water power 
and overcame many of the difficulties 



experienced with the primitive water 
wheel, and so, as was quite natural, de- 
velopment took place along that line 
very much more rapidly than along the 
other. The requirements of marine 
navigation also helped on this develop- 
ment considerably. 

However, the advent of electric trans- 
mission has removed the great drawback 
to water power and now development 
is rapidly taking place. The great ex- 
ample of this development in Canada 
is the " harnessing of the mighty Nia- 
gara." Had electricity and the num- 
erous inventions for its application pre- 
ceded the invention of the steam engine, 
what would the conditions have been 
to-day? That is a question easily put 
but hard to answer. 

Thinking of the immense turbines 
which are to be installed in the wheel 
pits of the different power companies 
at the Falls, it would be of no little in- 
terest to follow the development in the 
methods of utilizing water power. 

Naturally enough the first method to 
present itself was that of pure gravita- 
tion. This was compiled in the simple 
overshot water wheel, which received its 
water at the top of the fall and carried 
it down to the discharge level in what 
might be called buckets on its perichery 
they being somewhat similar to those 
used in the elevation of grain. This 
water wheel was slowly improved in 
several ways, such as providing an 
air vent to insure promptness of dis- 
charge and in the shaping of the buck- 
ets to insure the pressure being in the 
line of motion as much as possible. In 
Canada there are none of these primi- 
tive wheels now in operation, although 
it is not very long ago that they were 
to be seen occasionally. 

The force of gravity was. the princi- 
ple of the second kind of water wheel 
to be investigated. An improvement 
was made in the application of the water 
in that it was received lower down and 
confined in a sluice around the buckets 
from the point of reception to the point 
of discharge. However, it was even 
more cumbrous than the first design, 



and therfore was short Lived. The chief 
faults of these wheels were their size 
and the trouble occasioned in cold 
weather witii the formation of ice upon 
them. 

The next principle brought under con- 
sideration was that of impulse, or the 
direct application of an issue of water 
to the runner. This primitive impulse 
wheel had many good qualities, and it 
was used quite extensively in early Am- 
erican saw mills These were all at first 
constructed of wood, but this was not 
found to give very economic results, 
since they were easily racked and the 
wood gave little freedom for the proper 
lines and curves. 

However, with modern reforms and 
materials they have been brought to a 
high state of efficiency. The impulse 
wheel has particular advantages under 
high heads of water, but they are not 
suitable for all purposes. 

For this reason a change was made 
from the purely impulse wheel princi- 
ple when in its early stages of develop- 
ment. This change was an additional 
principle rather than a departure from 
the impulse principle. The additional 
principle was that of reaction, which 
may be noted at any time in the rotating 
lawn sprinkler. The combination of 
these two principles is the foundation 
from which has developed the turbine 
water wheel. At first the experiment was 
tried of making a turbine on the prin- 
ciple of reaction alone, but, since there 
was no means of regulating the supply 
of Dower from a given wheel without de- 
stroying most of that in excess of the 
reouirements, this form of turbine was 
soon thrown out of the field. However, 
the purely impulse principle has been 
applied to turbines and has proved a 
great success, being for some purposes 
far ahead of the turbine comprising both 
principles. 

The Fourneyron turbine was per- 
fected in 1834. II is an impulse wheel, 
but savors a little of the principle of re- 
action. It receives its water from I he 
inside whence it is projected by means 
of stationary guides into the moving 
vanes or flpats, at right angles to the 
guides at the point of issue. These mov- 



17 



Harowaro ana 
Met.l 



MACHINERY 



in»' vanes have their heel carried well 
around so as to remove the final mo- 
mentum of the water as it leaves the 
outer rim. This wheel gave a high per- 
centage of useful effect, but was rather 
cumbrous and very expensive, so that 
for general purposes it was not a suc- 
cess. However it embodied the proper 
principles of utilizing the water, and, 
for that reason, many attempts were 
made to simplify it. 

This was done some 30 years after- 
wards, but in the process it was found 
necessary to alter the method of apply- 
in" the water slightly. Instead of forc- 
ing the water to discharge into a con- 
tracted centre it is allowed to pass down- 
ward into an inclined heel bucket which 
spreads the discharge issue fully to the 
outside and which is curved and in- 
clined in such a way as to arrest the 
highest jjossible percentage of the mo- 
mentum of the water. 

Ninety-five per cent, of the modern 
turbines are of this class. These tur- 
bines are suitable for falls of water as 
high as 60 feet, and that accounts for 
such a large per cent, of water wheels 
being of the modified Fourneyron tur- 
bine type. For falls over 60 feet -in 
height and under three hundred the orig- 
inal Fourneyron turbine has not been 
excelled. Where the quantity of Avater 
in this second class of falls is limited 
and where the height exceeds the rough 
limit set, a third class of turbine has 
been designed. It is an impulse wheel, 
and receives its water from one or more 
nozzles around its periphery. It does 
not attempt to check the issue suddenly, 
but does so gradually by its well pro- 
portioned curves. Its useful effect is 
quite high. 

The subject of the utilization of water 
for motive power purposes is a broad 
and interesting one, lending itself close- 
ly, as it does, to the economic running 
of machinery to cany on our present 
industries and to develope future ones. 
Now that power can be so effectively 
transmitted by the electric current there 
are great strides likely to be made along 
this line. A suitable foundation on 
which to build up such a statement is 
the fact of the construction of sucli 
large water power developing plants 
now being carried on at Niagara Falls. 

Electric Smelting. 

IN an address before the Ottawa Board 
of Trade, L. Simpson gave some in- 
formation which, owing to the inter- 
est taken in the subject of electric 
smelting, is of peculiar interest. After 



referring to the presence of large areas 
of iron ore which because of the lack 
of coal for coking, are not being worked, 
he pointed out that nature had been 
lavish witli water power in the district. 
This could be used for the development 
of electricity which might take the place 
of coke for smelting purposes. Mr. 
Simpson claimed that the quality of 
the iron and steel would be better if 
produced by the electric process of 
smelting than -if the product of the 
coke smelters. He believed thai there 
could be little doubt that the project 
was commercially possible and profit- 
able. The appointment of a commission 
by the Dominion Government to investi- 
gate prevailing processes in the United 
State and Europe was a wise step. In 
dealing with the subject technically Mr. 
Simpson drew attention to an advantage 
in the higher purity of the resulting 
product. Another advantage claimed 
was that aluminum and other metals 
could be introduced in the smelting pro- 
cess at a great saving in cost. 

A New Machine. 

IN brush factories the usual way of 
mixing and combing bristles for 
brushes has been by hand labor, and 
it has always been a task of difficulty. 
According to the St. John (N.B.) Sun 
there has been invented a machine for 
this purpose. The paper says : 

A bristle by itself is a very easy 
thing to handle, but taken in combina- 
tion with some hundreds of others .of 
the tribe it assumes a pig-headed ob- 
stinacy that leaves no doubt as to its 
parentage. To overcome this difficulty 
in handling bristles a machine, invented 
in Germany, reached this city a few 
days ago and is now in working order 
in the brush factory of T. S. Simms* & 
( 'ompany, on Union street. So far 
this is the only machine in Canada 
that mixes and combs bristles without 
the use of hand labor, and its capacity 
is equal to the work of at least ten 
men. In the manufacture of brushes, 
bristles of various grades of quality and 
thickness are used, and it is the work 
of this machine to blend them tog-ether 
so that the various kinds of bristle may 
be evenly _ divided and distributed 
throughout the brush when made up. 
To effect this two bundles of bristles of 
different kinds are placed one after the 
other on an endless band and fed to the 
machine. They are kept in position by 
discs and " butters," these latter, as 
their name suggests, " butting " or pat- 
ting the ends to keep them even. As 



the bristles pass along they are repeated- 
ly combed by circular combs driven at 
a high rate of speed and by this means 
are spread out into thiner layers. An 
appliance with the back and forth mo- 
tion of a shuttle receives them at a 
lower level on the machine and neatly 
drops them in a thin line on to another 
section of the endless band first men- 
tioned, before this lias time to pass from 
under the track of the shuttle it is back 
again and evenly distributes a further 
layer this time partly composed of 
bristles of the second grade and thick- 
ness. The two kinds will now pass 
through the machine again and be fur- 
ther combed and mixed and if neces- 
sary receive a third class of bristles 
The process then continues until the 
blending is complete, which in reality is 
but a matter of minutes. 

New Motor. 

A DESPATCH from London, Eng., 
says that there are being pub- 
lished there particulars of a new 
motor invented by Peter Thornley, an 
engineer at Burton-on-Trent. Some- 
what marvelous powers are claimed for 
this new motor. It is claimed that its 
development may result in the running 
of locomotives at twice their present 
speed, and with only half the cost. 

The motor described is very compact, 
everything but the driving wheels be- 
ing enclosed in a casing not much larger 
than that of a typewriter. The new- 
motor is capable of developing 1,500 
revolutions per minute and giving 15 
horse-power under a boiler pressure of 
200 pounds, per square inch. 

In the best railway locomotives the 
steam is admitted to the cylinder after 
the piston has moved back from five to 
eight inches. Thus a comparatively 
large vacuum is formed which has to 
he filled before any power is exerted by 
the steam upon the piston head. In his 
invention Thornley claims to have over- 
come this defect by a valve device which 
will admit a given quantity of steam at 
the commencement of every stroke, and 
this is so adjusted that the expansive 
force of the steam admitted is just sulli- 
cient to drive the piston to the end of 
the stroke. By this economy of steam 
he claims that a saving of fully 25 per 
cent, in coal can be made. The sim- 
plicity of the motor is such that the 
initial cost is below that of existing 
types. Compressed air can be used as 
well as steam. 



18 



MACHINERY 



Bread, Milk and Trade Checks 

Made of BRASS or ALUMINUM. 

SEND FOR PRICES 

STENCILS, STEEL STAMPS, 
RUBBER STAMPS, Etc. 



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HAMILTON, ONT. 



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MANUFACTURED BY 

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HAHILTON, CANADA. 
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Hardware and 
Metal 



MACHINERY 



Locomotive Trials. 
r p HE Great Northwestern Railway 
1 Co., of England, have purchased 
a French locomotive of the 
famous De (Helm, four-cylinder com- 
pound type, and are going to test it in 
a series of trials with one of their own 
construction. The company say that 
thev intend to adopt as their design for 
all future express engines the type that 
proves most successful. 

The French engine is a ten-wheeler, 
consisting of a four-wheel bogie, four 
coupled driving wheels and a pair of 
trailing wheels under the fire box. It 
lias the advantage of being workable as 
a four cylinder simple engine should 
circumstances render such an operation 
desirable. This feature is supposed to 
be the secret of the success of the Glelm 
type of locomotive. 

The British locomotive belongs to the 
type of engine which achieved the 
world's record fong distance run to 
Plymouth with the royal special last 
July. 

Increased Use of Electric Energy. 

Reports of the officers carrying out 
the Electric Light Inspection Act at 
Ottawa show that the use of the electric 
light has increased greatly in Canada 
during the past year. This increase is 
represented by 236,865 incandescent 
lights, or their equivalent in arc lights, 
which represents a 21 per cent, increase 
over the year before, of the provinces 
Ontario, is by far the greatest user, it 
having 203 out of the 324 electric plants 
in use in the Dominion. However, Brit- 
ish Columbia shows the largest propor- 
tionate increase, it being 82 per cent. 

The largest single plant in the Do- 
minion is that of the Toronto Electric 
Light Co., with its 170,000 lamps. The 
next largest is that of the Lachine 
Rapids Hydraulic Co., with 158,503 
lights, and the third is the Ottawa Elec- 
tric Co., with 111,927 lights. 

The Machinery Markets. 

TORONTO. 

C^ ENERAI, machinery market condi- 
y lions arc very bright this week. 
The reason for this brightness is 
the realization of the expectations of 
some weeks back as to what the mar- 
ket condition would be about the middle 
or towards the close of the month of 
January. The market reports in 
'J lard ware and Metal" for several 
issues back have shown that the actual 
amount of business done was not great, 
but that there were numerous inquiries 



received. The number of these inquiries 
was large, even surprisingly so, and on 
this and other indications, it was gen- 
erally thought that the prospects for a 
good opening up "of trade some time 
during January were very bright. These 
suppositions have proven correct. To- 
wards the end of last week trade began 
to pick up fn almost all lines, and there 
was a special run on sawmill machinery, 
general wood-working machinery, and in 
engines and boilers. During this week 
the demand for these lines of machinery 
has continued to be good, and there has 
also been considerable business clone in 
most of the other lines of machinery. 
The inquiries which came in during the 
earlier part of the month are now bear- 
ing fruit, and are resulting in substan- 
tial orders. From some sources there 
is reported a special demand for iron- 
working machinery this week, especially 
machine shop tools. However, this is 
not a general feature of the market. 
There is one feature of the market 
which is not what was somewhat gen- 
erally expected, and that is the small 
amount of business done in the line of 
electrical machinery. It is reported 
that the situation has not been much 
brighter, if any, during this week, than 
it was during last. Neither the number 
of inquiries for dynamos, motors and 
generators large by any means, and, 
consequently, the outlook for this line 
of machinery is not what machinery 
dealers would like. One reason given 
for this is that so many orders were 
placed during the early part of Decem- 
ber, that it is not to be expected that 
there should be a good demand for that 
class of machinery at the present time. 
Some of the manufacturers of electrical 
machinery say that the market is as it 
has always been in former years, and 
that, consequently, the relative dulness 
is not to be wondered at. Machinery 
dealers are almost unanimous in saying 
that this week has witnessed a promis- 
ing opening up of the machinery trade 
for the coming year. 

The II. W. Petrie Machinery Co. re- 
port a good demand for iron-working 
machinery this week. They have just 
received the contract for the complete 
equipment of the automobile factory of 
The Rodpath Motor Vehicle Co. of Ber- 
lin, Berlin, Out. They are also supply- 
ing W. J. Thorn, manufacturer of fine 
tools and machinery, London, Ont., 
with an outfit of Cincinnatti machine 
tools. Whalen & Bowman, of Port Ar- 
thur, are also getting an outfit of 
machine-shop tools from them. They 
report a continuation of the good de- 
mand for wood-working machinery and 
for boilers and engines. They are pre- 
paring to ship a sawmill outfit to Bar- 
rett Bros., Ottawa; and they have also 

■20 



on hand the contract for the installa- 
tion of motive machinery, including a 
large Wheelock engine and boiler, with 
the necessary shafting and belting. 
This company say that the demand for 
miscellaneous machinery has been steady 
during this week, and that the numerous 
inquiries received during the last three 
weeks are resulting in a good many 
orders. They think that the prospects 
for the coming season are very bright 
indeed. 

The A. R. Williams Machinery Co. 
report that the run an wood-working 
machinery, inciuding sawmill, shingle- 
mill and planing mill outfits, has con- 
tinued during this week. The demand 
for engines and boilers has also been 
very good, as it was last week. How- 
ever, the amount of business done in 
other lines of machinery has not been 
noticeably increased since the latter 
part of last week. This firm have just 
added two travellers to their travelling 
staff. 

The Levy, Weston & McLean Machin- 
ery Co. say that they have found the 
demand for sawmill machinery, planing 
mill machinery and o'ther wood-working 
machinery very good this week, as it 
was last. Engines and boilers also 
continue to occupy considerable atten- 
tion by buyers. As to other lines of 
machinery, they say the demand is fair- 
ly good, and that the demand for iron- 
working machinery, principally machine 
tools, is beginning to assume the pro- 
portions expected of it. They think 
that there is every reason to consider 
this a prosperous opening up in the 
machinery trade. 

The Jones & Moore Electric Cor nave 
nothing very bright to say of the mar- 
ket for electrical machinery. The num- 
ber of orders placed have been very few, 
if any, more than last week, and the 
number of inquiries are not promising 
for a brightening of the market in the 
near future. "Of course," said Mr. 
Jones, "our factory is running to its 
full capacity, but" the work being done 
is principally on orders placed before 
Christmas. Perhaps that is one of the 
reasons we are not booking many orders 
at present. If the factory were ready 
for more work, and we put forth our 
best efforts in all probability we would 
get more orders than we are. However, 
as it is, we are catching up on booked 
orders, and are content for the present 
to let things go on as they are." 

William R. Perrin & Co., manufac- 
turers of hydraulic presses, power 
presses, filter presses, etc., report that 
the demand for their lines of machinery 
at the present time is very good. This 
company have just been granted a char- 
ter by the Ontario Government incor- 
porating them under the name of Wil- 



MACHINERY 



Hard-ware and 

Metal 



<C Hardware and hletal^ 





SheJie 
The Tree - 

Theres Mone y 

In It 



/ 



/ 



Different ways of getting fruit. 

Some ripens and falls — just 
naturally. 

Some is picked. 

For the balance you must 
shake the tree. 



t I 

1 ' I / & 

i >*l Differen; ways of getting busi- 
J^. ness, too. 

Some just comes your way 
naturally — (nowadays very little 
comes this way). 

Other business you send your 
travellers out to "pick." 

A lot more of it you have to 
advertise in Hardware and 
Metal to get. 

This latter kind is worth hav- 
ing, too — there's money in it. 
Shake ! 

Hardware and 
Metal 

Montreal 

and 
Toronto. 




"We invito 

inquiries 
for 



STEEL RAILS, 



BAR IRON, PIG IRON GALVAN 
IZED IRON, CANADA PLATES, 
TINPLATES, WIRE ROPE (W. B. 
BROWN 4 CO,), CEMENT, FIREBRICKS, ORE BAGS, GRAIN BAGS, ETC. 



C. F. JACKSON & CO., Limited, IMPORTERSand COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

151 Hastings St. W., VANCOUVER. B.C., and LIVERPOOL. ENGLAND. 



BABBIT 



THE 




N9o 

STAR 'fsM 
SPECIAL i 
HERCULES 
METALLIC 
IMPERIAL 



(anada Metal (p. 

William StJORONTO. telephone main \m. 



BUY DIRECT AND SAVE MONEY. 

— We are the only Canadian Manufacturers of — 

COLD PRESSED NUTS 

■rifi/ffiA roiKDnvP^ 
company. ($•.. j Square and Hexagon Finished, Semi-Finished, Case 
Hardened, Polished and Plated, Set Screws, 
Cap Screws, Thumb Screws. 

CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY, 





LIMITED, 



Head Office, 



TORONTO, ONT. 



District Offices — Montreal, Halifax, Ottawa, Winnipeg, Vancouver, Victoria, Rossland. 



ice 



To Metal Polishers 




REGISTERED 



flAOE, MAR* 



After February 1st we can fill promptly all orders for 
grain corundum, (emery is an iron ore containing corundum). 
Our new mill has a greater capacity than any other abrasive 
plant in the world. 

Substitute a pure Canadian product, CRAIG MINE 
CORUNDUM, for the impure foreign corundum, called 
emery. 

Write us Regarding a yearly contract. 



The Canada Corundum Company, \m 



TORONTO, CANADA. 



21 



HardwBre and 
Metal 



MACHINERY 



liain R. Perrin & Co., with a capital of 
$10,000. The directors are W. R. Per- 
rin, W. H. Parmelee and M. H. Perrin. 

MONTREAL. 

On the whole, there seems to be a 
better feeling this week among the 
machinery houses, most of which report 
some improvement in this week's busi- 
ness compared with last. This improve- 
ment is manifesting itself more perhaps 
in the increased number of inquiries re- 
ceived this week, hut there is also some 
improvement in actual business done. 
Some large orders are soon to be placed 
for machine tools and for heavy engines 
and boilers. A number of firms are 
competing for these orders, and it is 
thought they are likely to go to Cana- 
dian firms. 

As noted last week, however, there is 
a disposition on the part of some buy- 
ers to hold off in the hope that a 
slump in values in the American metal 
and machinery markets may force Can- 
adian makers to reduce their prices. 
American machinery houses are, with- 
out doubt, hustling for business in Can- 
ada, hut there have been altogether too 
much cry of "wolf" on the part of a 
few men who have been afraid of a con- 
sequent slaughtering of prices. Inquiries 
made by "Hardware and Metal" this 
week failed to show that any very 
startling price concessions are being 
offered by the representatives of Ameri- 
can machinery houses. The only effect 
which the presence in Canada of an un- 
usual number of these gentlemen has 
had so far has been to create an un- 
settled feeling among buyers, who hope 
that from the competition of a large 
rumber of sellers, lower prices may 
result. A local machinery agent in dis- 
cussing the situation this week with 
"Hardware and Metal," said that Can- 
adian manufacturers are quite as inde- 
pendent as they were a year ago, and 
he argues from their independent atti- 
tude towards agent and buyer that they 
have plenty of work on hand and are 
confident as to the future. 

The sawmills up the Ottawa have re-' 
sumed their operations, and from them 
has come during the week orders for 
machinery supplies, which have helped 
to stimulate business. One or two sales 
of complete sawmill outfits have been 
made quite recently. 

Another feature of the week has been 
an increased inquiry for gas and gaso- 
lene engines. 

The Laurie Engine Co. report a slight 
falling off this week in the number of 
inquiries received for large engines and 
boilers, but, as they have sufficient work 
on hand to keep them busily employed 
until the middle of the Summer, they 
see nothing in the situation to excite 



alarm. Inquiries for iron and wood- 
working machinery have been coming in 
freely during the week, and a few good 
orders have been booked. At Thetford 
Mines The Laurie Engine Co. have in- 
stalled unite recently some mining 
machinery of their own manufacture. A 
complete sawmill outfit, including en- 
gine and boiler, for a Quebec town, is 
among the week's sales. Trade- seems 
to be opening up nicely this week, the 
volume of business being considerably in 
excess of that of last week. 

The Fairbanks Co. report actual busi- 
ness this week comparatively quiet, but 
the number of inquiries received is an 
encouraging sign, which points to good 
business later on. They are paying par- 
ticular attention at present to pushing 
the sales of a line of gas and gasolene 
engines and they report that the num- 
ber of inquiries received for their 
engines during the last week has been 
an encouraging feature. 

E. Leonard & Sons report encourag- 
ing prospects this week, not only in 
engines and boilers, but also in mining 
machinery. 

Mr. Alfred Rubra, of the Machinery 
Exchange, reports a slight increase in 
this week's business compared with 
last. Buyers are making inquiries, and, 
although there is a disposition in some 
quarters to hold off, in the hope of 
lower prices, Mr. Rubra thinks that 
prospects for this season are quite 
favorable. Business is quite up to the 
usual standard for this time of year. 

Fred Thompson & Co. have more 
work on hand in the manufacture of 
dynamos, motors, and specialties of 
various kinds, than they can attend to. 
Williams and Wilson report an im- 
provement as compared with last week's 
business. Actual business this week 
shows a considerable increase, and the 
increased number of inquiries coming in 
point to a good season. 

W. H. Nolan, of the Canadian Machin- 
ery Agency, is well satisfied with the 
way business is opening out this year. 
This week's trade shows some improve- 
ment over last. 

NEW YORK. 

The Iron Age says of the New York 
market : 

Evidences of a better tone are to be 
noted in all branches of the machinery 
trade. In some lines this has crystal- 
ized into orders, but, considering the 
trade ^collectively, it is chiefly due to 
marked increase in inquiry. An officer 
of one of the very large machine tool 
houses, in speaking of the improvement 
in inquiries both as to number and tone, 
referred to several which commenced 
something like this : "We are now in a 
position to take up the matter of equip- 
ment which we had under advisement 
last Spring." Indications of ibis sort 
are, of course, of the best, and from 
present appearances a good many latent 
propositions will soon be stirred into 
renewed activity. No exceptionally 
large orders were reported during the 
week. 



Machinery and Electrical Notes. 

The large new boiler for the New 
Brunswick Foundry, Fredericton, is now 
being installed. 

The Grand Trunk Railway Company 
have ordered 15,000 tons of best Eng- 
lish rails at $23.50 per ton. 

The C. P. R. will extend their Gatin- 
eau branch sufficiently far north to con- 
nect with the Grand Trunk Pacific. 

Several lumber camps in central On- 
tario have been compelled to desist lum- 
bering operations owing to the depth 
of snow. 

An attempt will be made to have the 
"White Bear mine, Rossland district, B.C. 
concentrator ready for operation by 
June 1. 

The new boiler for the Bennett Manu- 
facturing Co., Pickering, Ont., has been 
installed, and factory operations will be 
started at once. 

The new machine shop of the Page- 
Hersey Iron and Tube Mills, which 
was completed some two months ago is 
reported to be giving great satisfaction. 
Mackenzie & Mann, Toronto, have 
made the statement that they have plac- 
ed orders for 25,000 tons of standard 
steel rails at $26 f.o.b. Port Arthur, for 
use on the C.N.R. 

E. J. H. Pauley, president of the Do- 
minion Linen Mills Co., Orillia. Ont., is 
in Great Britain purchasing machinery 
for the new mills to be erected in thai 
town this Spring. 

The C. P. R. have experts examining 
the Port Arthur, Ont., elevators, with a 
view of installing electricity as a motive 
power. The cost of installing electricity 
would be about $500,000. 

Canadian carriage-makers were in 
Ottawa last week seeing the Govern- 
ment with a view of getting additional 
protection. There is now a duty of 35 
per cent., but there is a class of chean 
carriages coming from the United States 
against which the Canadian manufactur- 
ers are asking now to be protected. 

The Blackstoek Mining Syndicate, 
Toronto, have about ready for opera- 
tion a plant on the Columbia River, B.C , 
350x120 feet, three stories high, equip- 
ped with improved machinery for con- 
centrating and cyaniding. The mills are 
intended for the treatment of low "rade 
ores of the Centre Star and War Eagle 
mines. The output of the mill will be 
400 tons a day, and the average value 
of each ton is placed at $10, which will 
mean a turnover running up into big 
figures. 

M. L. Lewis, a street railway promoter, 
of Boston, U.S.A., was in Toronto re- 
cently and he is credited with the state- 
ment that electric railway lines may 
now be constructed and equipped so much 
cheaper than steam roads that they are 
certain to become serious rivals in the 
next few years. He says that sleeping 
cars are being operated in connection 
with electric lines of railway in several 
parts of the States, where special pas- 
senger and freight trains are operated 
lor the benefit of the rural traffic. 



22 



hardware and metal 



RON 



Bars in Flats, Rounds, Squares, 
Ovals, Malt Ovals, Half kouiulsand 
Bands. Also Wrought Washers. 

QOOD QUALITY. PROflPT SHIPMENT. 



London Rolling Mill Co. 

Limited, 
LONDON, CANADA. 



STEEL 



PAGE-HERSEY IRON & TUBE CO., 



GUELPH, CANADA, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 



Limited 



BLACK AND GALVANIZED 

WROUGHT MERCHANT PIPE 

OF SUPERIOR QUALITY AND FINISH. 




)fy*/%f**l\f***»»f%/**f%yS\/* **\i*J%s***\/**S\/»{Zl 



Ask 

and 

Receive. 

Advertise 

and 
Acquire. 



If you want to sell 
a business or a de- 
livery wagon, if you 
want a partner or a 
clerk — advertise. 
If you have what 
you don't want, or 
haven't whatyoudo 
want— advertise. 
Our condensed 
advertisements 
cost little, but are 
worth a good deal. 

You can reach most of the general 
merchants in Canada at the expense of 
a few cents. Our rate is 2c. per word 
first insertion, and lc. per word each 
subsequent insertion, and remittance 
must accompany order in every case. 



$ 



k 



k 



* HARDWARE AND METAL 

J MONTREAL and TORONTO 



23 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BAR IRON 



and 



Rounds, Squares, Flats, Bands, Ovals, 
Y* Ovals, % Rounds, Nut, Bolt and Horse Shoe 
Iron, Tire Steel, Sleigh Shoe Steel, Toe Calk 
Steel, Soft Machinery Steel, etc., etc. 



THE PECK ROLLING MILLS Limited 



Cut Nails 
Wire Nails 
Horse Nails 




Horse Shoes 

Spikes 

Tacks 



BRANDS 



nEADomcE: 210 Coristine Building, MONTREAL 



works: LACHINE CANAL. 



SAMSON RAILROAD or DELIVERY 

CAN TRIMMINGS. 



Our celebrated seamless cover is furnished with all Samson cans 
— it has no seams in the rim to collect dirt or wear loose. 

Is drawn from one piece of steel which makes it perfectly 
uniform in size. 

The seamless neck is drawn from one piece of specially prepared 
steel, as is also the breast. They are then annealed to prevent any 
possibility cf cracking, double seamed together and retinned, which 
practically makes them one piece. 

Our Famous Samson bottom is also supplied with these trimmings. 




BELL COVER 




"SAMSON." 
Neck and Breast. 



Samson Pail Bottom 



Made exactly the same as our Samson Milk Can Bottom, and 
therefore has all its good features. 




Cut shows section of 
bottom of pail- 




SAMS 



London, 



& McClary Manufacturing Co. 

Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver, St. John, N.B. 

(\ t— ^ " EVERYTHING FOR THE TINSHOP." 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



President : 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN, 

Montreal. 

,h€ MacLcan Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 



Montreal 



offices. 



Toronto 



- 232 McGill Street. 

Telephone Main 1255 

10 Front Street East. 

Telephone Main 2701 

WINNIPEG, Man. - Room 308, Mclntyre Block. 

Telephone 1846. 

E. C. Hind. 

„ L. P. Luxton. 

LONDON, Eng. - - 109 Fleet Street, E.C. 

J. Meredith McKim. 

Manchester, Eng. - 02 Market Street. 

_ H. S. Ashburner. 

St. John, N.B. - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 

NEW York - Room 1241 New York Life Bldg 

W. T. Robson. 
Vancouver, B.C. - Geo. S. B. Perry. 

Subscription, Canada and United States, 82.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s 

Published every Saturday. 



Cable Address 



Adscript, London. 
Adscript, Canada. 



A DOMINION EXHIBITION AT 
WINNIPEG. 

T) USINESS men in Winnipeg and the 
West express great satisfaction 
with the decision of the Dominion Gov- 
ernment to make a grant of $50,000 to- 
wards holding a Dominion Exhibition in 
Winnipeg in July. It is probable that 
this action will be followed by similar 
grants from the city and the Provincial 
Government. 

This grant comes at an opportune 
time. On the American side every ef- 
ford is being strained to prevent emi- 
gration to Canada and our American 
cousins are by no means scrupulous in 
their methods, so that stories injurious 
to the Canadian West, and which are 
absolutely without foundation are be- 
ing printed in circular form and dis- 
tributed by the thousand. So strong 
has the opposition become that bankers 
have formed a league not to loan money 
for investment in the Canadian West. 
The Winnipeg Real Estate Exchange is 
taking this matter up and sending a 
strong delegation to a convention of 
American real estate men interested in 



EDITORIAL 

Canadian lands which is to he held in 
Minneapolis in January. Bu1 this Do- 
minion Exhibition will do more than 
any other one thing to stem the tide of 
opposition. The people will come and 
see for themselves what the country is 
like and what it can produce. 



LARGER POWERS OF SELF-GOV- 
ERNMENT. 

A GREAT deal of needless capital is 
being made in both Canada and 
Great Britain out of the remarks of Sir 
Wilfrid Laurier as to the necessity of 
Canada being given larger powers in 
regard to treaty making and questions 
arising over international territorial dis- 
putes. 

In Great Britain, particularly, there 
appears to be people who see in the pro- 
posal the entering in of the thin edge of 
the wedge of political independence. It 
means nothing of the kind. What is 
really meant is larger powers of respon- 
sible government, which is dear to the 
heart of every Canadian. 

The principle is not new in Canadian 
politics. It was enunciated many years 
ago by Mr. Edward Blake. And if it 
was felt to be a necessity then, it is a 
great deal more so now. 

We are simply wanting the power to 
manage our own affairs and any one who 
is at all conversant with Canadian his- 
tory, knows that the greater the lati- 
tude Canada has been given in matters 
of self-government, the stronger have 
become the ties of consanguinity be- 
tween this country and the Motherland. 
There are still a few statesmen in Great 
Britain who regret that Canada was al- 
lowed in 1S46 to regulate her own Cus- 
toms tariff, but had she not been so al- 
lowed, it is scarcely probable that Can- 
ada to-day would have been a part of 
the British Empire. 

The securing of the power outlined 
by Sir Wilfrid Laurier will be another 
step in the direction of completion in 
the matter of self-government, and like 
all previous steps in that direction, mean 
the cementing, not the dismemberment, 
of the Empire. 

The trend of things is already in that 
direction. At one time Canada had prac- 
25 



Hardware And 

MeUl 

tically no voice in international affairs 
affecting her welfare. The injustice has, 
however, beef) disappearing by easy 
stages, until in the last international 
tribunal to settle the Alaskan boundary 
question, two out of three jurists repre- 
senting the Canadian or British side, 
were the appointees of our own Govern- 
ment, The rights granted toCanada in 
1878 to decide whether or not she should 
be included in any treaty made by Great 
Britain with a foreign power, was also 
a step in the direction towards that more 
complete system of responsible govern- 
ment which Sir Wilfrid Laurier, and, 
we believe, the majority of the people 
of this country, are seeking. 

By granting the larger powers out- 
lined by the Premier, the source of the 
1 nly serious grievance Canada has had 
against the Imperial authorities during 
the last half century will have been re- 
moved. It, therefore, follows that in 
the interests of the unity of the Empire, 
these powers should be conceded. 

It is only a question of time before 
the right to manage our own affairs in 
regard to treaty making and territorial 
boundary questions must be granted, and 
Canada should now be sufficiently in the 
confidence of the British Government to 
have this right unhesitatingly accorded 
her. 



VISIT THE TRADE CENTRES. 

THE merchant whose ambition is 
higher than the mere making of a 
fortune selling hardware, finds 
frequent visits to urban communities of 
far greater value to him in the building 
up of his business, than any amount of 
shrewdness in buying. He finds at least 
two trips a year, no matter at what dist- 
ance he may reside, a necessity both to 
good buying and good selling. 

Every visit to the city serves to bring 
him closer in touch with existing con- 
ditions in all ines of goods. A valuable 
knowledge can be obtained in this way 
of new goods for specialties, novel ideas 
for window and interior decoration and 
the like. He will also have the oppor- 
tunity of making the personal acquaint- 
ance of the wholesaler with whom he 
deals, while at the same time, if lie keeps 



Hard-ware and 

Metal 



EDITORIAL 



his eyes open, he may gather a general 
fund of information that will be of con- 
siderable interest to his customers. Bar- 
gains can be always picked up on these 
trips that will perhaps pay the expejice 
incurred. 

The merchant who thinks to save 
money by remaining at home, or con- 
siders himself too busy to leave, or is 
disinclined from any other cause, is not 
in a position to successfully compete 
with his rival who regularly visits the 
commercial centres. 



SPECIAL LINES FOR THE HARDWARE STORE. 



THE LACK OF TASTE. 
\\T HEN a merchant displays little 

V V interest in his window, he often 
hides behind the fact that he has no 
taste for window dressing, that is, that 
he has none of the artistic qualifications 
that show themselves in first-class win- 
dows. As is the case in most of the 
causes to which the unprogressive mer- 
chant assigns his unattractive windows, 
it is a characteristic which he does not 
endeavor to overcome. He really thinks 
it is so, and blames this rather than lack 
of effort on his part. • 

It may be true enough in some cases 
that a merchant doing his very best 
would make his windows look like a 
store-room, or would be utterly unable to* 
acquire the desired effect. Such a man 
is, however, deprived of all excuse by 
the fact that his clerk, or one of them 
is not likely to be as inartistic as he is . 
If so, it simply shows that a new clerk 
is required. 

Neatness is essential to the effective 
display, and a window in which it is a 
prominent feature is sure to have its 
attractions, although perhaps not so well 
arranged as if by an experienced win- 
dow dresser. With time too, he will 
improve his eye for beauty and the ease 
with which he will think of designs. 
Ambition and practice is all that is 
necessaiy to make a fair window dresser 
out of any man. 



LOOKING FOR AGENCIES. 

A British Columbia hardware firm 
who are giving up their retail business 
to devote themselves entirely to the 
wholesale trade and to various agencies 
in British Columbia would like to cor- 
respond with any readers of this paper 
desiring to secure such agents. Address 
enquiries re same to The Editor. 
" Hardware and Metal," Toronto. 



LAST week the suggestion was made 
that of the many lines which 
could be added to the hai'dware mer- 
chant's stock-in-trade stock food should 
receive consideration. The value of this 
line has been demonstrated to several 
dealers, some of whom write that they 
not only carry the line but are paying 
particular attention to it at the moment, 
as February is one of the busiest months 
of the year in this line. 

Another line which is winning in- 
creasing attention from hardware men 
is seeds, particularly garden seeds, 



AN INVOCATION. 

The day returns and brings 
us the petty round of irritating 
concerns and duties. Help us 
to play the man; help us to 
perform them with laughter 
and kind faces. Let cheerful- 
ness abound with industry. Give 
us to go blithely on our busi- 
ness all this day; bring us to 
our resting beds weary and con- 
tent and undishonored, and 
grant us in the end the gift of 
sleep. 

—Robert Louis Stevenson. 



though grass seeds are a paying line 
with many. This line is also carried 
by flour and feed dealers as well as by 
some druggists and general merchants. 
Inasmuch, however, as the buyers jf 
seeds nearly always want garden tools, 
etc., at the time they want seeds, hard- 
ware men have found the line one that 
yields good returns. There is a good 
turnover, considering the capital, at- 
tention and store space devoted to it, 
and the margin of profits is large. 

Stock foods and seeds could be car- 
ried together, each would help to in- 
crease the sales of the other. 

Another line which is always worthy 
of attention in early Spring is sporting 
goods. At present there is a fair de- 
mand for hockey and skating supplies 
but in a few weeks this will be over and 
attention will be turned to golf, base- 
ball, lacrosse, boating, croquet, etc. 
26 



Supplies for these sports as well as such 
lines as hammocks, fishing tackle, etc., 
should be kept in attractive variety in 
the hardware store and should be push- 
ed with such vigor and persistence that 
local buyers will feel the uselessness of 
sending to the Toronto or Montreal 
catalogue houses for such goods. 

It is true that some of these lines are 
carried by stationers in many towns. 
Yet it is generally admitted that the 
hardware store is the proper place for 
them and the hardware man can get the 
trade if he gets after it. 

In this connection it is well that bicy- 
cles should receive attention before the 
snow melts. Bicycles have been a pro- 
fitable line and later an unsatisfactory 
line. Of late years, however, they have 
won much more approval than during 
recent years. They are now built more 
substantially, so do not call for so many 
repairs; the parts are now uniform aud 
there is little difficulty in making re- 
pairs. Moreover the bicycle has come 
back to favor to some degree in recent 
years and bids fair to be even more popu- 
lar in the years to come. It should re- 
ceive consideration at this season of the 
year. 

The above are but a few of the lines 
which are worthy of especial attention 
at this season. The more of such Lines 
that a hardware dealer can mtrociu ■ 
into his business the better. 

TIME FOR A CLEANING UP. 

IT is not necessary to wait till the 
Spring time for giving the store a 
good overhauling. Stocktaking always 
brings to the front a quantity of goods 
which somehow got away back in the 
shelves and are now not as saleable as 
they would have been six months ago. 
It also changes the appearance of the 
store more or less. In fact there is no 
better season of the year than now to 
take the spare time of a week or so to 
so rearrange the stock as to give it the 
brightest, most attractive appearance 
possible. Then follow up this rearrange- 
ment by introducing the scrubbing brush 
to the floor and the diret cloth and even 
the paint brush to the counters, shelves, 
scales, show cases, etc 



HARDWARE AND MBTAl 



A PREMIUM ON BRAINS. 

PHYSICAL power, mental activity 
and moral force all contribute to 
the largest success in an undertaking. 
The man who lacks any of these is 
handicapped in the keen competition of 
business life. Yet as civiliization be- 
comes more intricate the dominance of 
the physical by the mental becomes the 
more striking, the more obvious. 

Moral force is the power possessed 
by practically all leaders of men, by 
nearly all successful business men. Thev 
learn to use to best advantage the brains 
or mental activities as well as the bodies 
or physical force of the employes. 

How to make the business use of the 
mental acuteness of a large staff of em- 
ployes is a problem in itself. Yet this 
problem is being solved in an admirable 
w ay by many of our leading business 
men. 

An instance of this has just come be- 
fore the notice of " Hardware and 
Metal " in the shape of a notice put up 
throughout the works of the Taylor- 
Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont., for the benefit 
of their employes. It was as follows: 

$250.00 — Prizes for Suggestions. 

#250.00 in cash prizes will be awarded to em- 
ployees submitting the best suggestions within the 
period beginning January 4th and ending June 
30th, 1904, the amounts to be divided as follows : 
1st prize, $50 ; 2nd prize, $35 ; 3rd prize, $25 ; 
4th prize, $20 ; 6 prizes each $10 ; 12 prizes each 
$5. 

The number of prizes offered makes it possible 
to reward some minor suggestions while recogniz- 
ing the efforts which assist in more important 
matters. 

Suggestions ought to be made by every employee 
even though they may seem of small importance, 
as each idra given may lead to a better one. In 
determining the relative order of the prizes the 
number of suggestions made by an employee, 
as well as their importance, will count. 

For these prizes ail factory and office employees 
(excepting heads of departments) are entitled to 
compete. 

Suggestions may relate to improvement in man- 
ufacture of any article, reduction of labor, 
machinery, tools, systems now employed, increase 
of trade, and to the general management of the 
business. The company reserves the right to keep 
any suggestions private. 

All suggestions must be made in writing and the 
employee's name signed thereto with date, and 
may be sent by post or deposited in the box at 
entrance hall provided for that purpose. 

The judges will be composed of the directors 
and a committee from amongst the heads of 
departments. 

We earnestly solicit the co-operation of all 
employees. 

Guelph, Ont., Taylor-Forbes Co., 

January 4th , 1904. Limited 

" Responsibilities go to the one who can shoulder 
them, and power flows to the man who knows 
how," 



It is by such co-operation that a mod- 
ern business institution can hope to de- 
delop the warmest relations between 
master and man and to realize the great- 
est degree of success and prosperity. 

MR. W. J. MUIR. 

HARDWARE AND METAL takes 
pleasure this week in presenting 
to its. readers the portrait of W. 
J. Muir, the eastern sales agent of The 
Canadian Cordage and Manufacturing 
Co. of Peterborough, Ontario. Mr. 
Muir is a young man who is deservedly 
popular with all classes of Montrealers, 
and by his candid and straightforward 
dealings with the trade he has won 
their confidence to a gratifying extent, 
as is being manifested by the steady in- 
crease in the volume of his business. A 
man of unfailing courtesy, always con- 




Mr. W. J. Muir. 

siderate of the feelings of others, Mr. 
Muir is also energetic and determined 
and possessed of a commendable inde- 
pendence of spirit. He is a business 
man of the right stamp. 

Mr. Muir has been connected with the 
cordage business for about eight years, 
serving in that time in various depart- 
ments, including the manufacturing. He 
possesses, therefore, a thorough practi- 
cal knowledge of the business, and, in 
consequence, much weight is attached 
by the trade to his opinions on all mat- 
ters pertaining to cordage. Mr. Muir 
takes a keen interest in the growth of 
the cordage business in Canada. Born 
in Montreal, he is a patriotic Canadian, 
and is justly proud of the fact that the 
cordage manufacturers of Canada, so 
far as make and quality are concerned, 
are not surpassed by any country in the 
world. And he smilingly observes that 



"Judging from the foreign goods which 
we sometimes see here, Canadian man- 
ufacturers are not equalled by many." 
His own company's mill at Peterbor- 
ough in point of improved machinery is 
one of the best on the continent, and 
Mr. Muir has the satisfaction of repre- 
senting a thoroughly progressive Cana- 
dian firm. 

Mr. Muir's popularity extends to al- 
most all parts of Canada, and in busi- 
ness and social circles to no one is ex- 
tended a more cordial welcome than to 
"Billy" Muir. 



INQUIRIES FOR CANADIAN TRADE. 

The following are among the inquiries 
as to Canadian trade received recently at 
the Canadian Branch of the Imperial 
Institute, London, Eng. 

1. A firm manufacturing patent paper bags of 
various kinds desires to be placed in communica- 
tion with a first-class Canadian importing house 
prepared to handle the goods. 

2. A London firm asks for addresses of Cana- 
dian shippers of black currant and other fruit pulp 

3. A firm handling large quantities of wood 
acetic lime invite correspondence from Canadian 
producers of same. 

[The names of those making inquiries 
may be obtained from the Editor of The 
Canadian Grocer.] 



METAL AND HARDWARE DINNER. 

^pHE Montreal Metal and Hardware 
1 Association of the Board of Trade 
held their third annual dinner at 
the Montreal Club on Wednesday even- 
ing, January 20th. Although small, the 
dinner was a thoroughly enjoyable af- 
fair and a very jolly evening was spent, 
short speeches, recitations, and songs 
keeping those present entertained until 
quite a late hour. 

In the absence through illness of the 
president, Mr. George Caverhill, the 
vice-president, Mr. G. A. Kohl, took the 
chair, the vice-chairs being occupied by 
Mr. George E. Druimnond, president- 
elect of the Board of Trade, and Mr. 
William McMaster. 

The following is a list of the sub- 
scribers and guests : Messrs. Fred Bacon, 
James Crathern, Geo. Caverhill, A. H. 
Campbell, James Davidson, Geo. E. 
Drummond, Thos. J. Drummond, H. J. 
Fuller, Geo. A. Kohl, J. B. Learmont, 
W. S. Leslie, William McMaster, Arthur 
McMaster, J. T. McCall, T. H. Newman, 
Thos. L. Paton, J. W. Pyke, Robert 
Starke, J. T. Knight, Colonel J. B. Mac- 
Lean. 



27 



Hard-ware And 
Metal 





QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 

232 MeGill Street. 

Montreal; January 22nd, 1904. 
Hardware. 

USINESS in wholesale circles 
this week shows a very con- 
siderable improvement over 
last, and the opinion is free- 
ly expressed that trade has 
at last emerged from the stagnation of 
the holiday season. It is expected that 
the activity of this week will continue 
as the Spring trade is now commencing. 
Orders this week for immediate delivery 
are considerably in excess of last week. 
Of .course these are sorting orders only. 
However, the travellers are sending in 
good orders for Spring delivery. These 
are coming in from all parts of the 
country and prospects are considered 
very bright for an unusually bright 
Spring trade. Payments are variously 
reported. One or two firms complain 
that retailers have been slow in meeting 
their obligations, but nearly all agree 
that the last month has seen an improve- 
ment in this respect. There are a num- 
ber of price changes this week, but none 
are of very much importance. Grind 
stone fixtures are a little lower, about 
5 per cent. Cotton goods are firm at a 
slight advance, which will be noted be- 
low. Hand saw handles and plane hand- 
les have advanced about 10 per cent. 
All wooden goods are firm and in some 
instances big advances have been made. 
Wooden bowls, for example, have been 
advanced from 25 per cent, to 50 per 
cent, and wooden grain measures have 
been advanced 10 per cent. Prices on 
these goods are " open " but these 
figures about represent the general trend 
of prices. 

Spring Hinges— Wholesale houses in- 
form us that good orders are now com- 
ing in for forward delivery. A good 
Spring and Summer trade seems as- 
sured. We quote: No. 5, $17.25 per 
gross; No. 10, $18 per gross; No. 20, 
$10.50; No. 120, $20; No. 51, $9.25; No. 
"(I, $27.50. 

Rubber Hose — For forward delivery 
some good orders have been booked this 
week and the number of inquiries re- 
ceived points to a brisk trade later on. 
Our information is that the cheap rub- 
ber hose (2-ply) in 1-2-inch and 3-4-inch 



sizes will not be made this season by 
the Canadian manufacturers. Any or- 
ders for same will have to be filled out 
of stock on hand, but it will be scarce 
and difficult to obtain. The list price 5s 
as follows: 

2-ply. 3-ply. 4-ply 
per foot, per foot, per foot 
1-2-inch .... 20c. 25c. 30c. 

3-4-inch .... 25c. 30c. 37c. 

1-inch 33c. 40c. 50c. 

The discounts from above list are as fol- 
lows Trade, 75 per cent.; Western. 65 
and 10 per cent.; white,. 40 and 10 per 
cent.; Maroon, 40 and 10 per cent.; 
Cotton, 60 per cent. 

Game Traps — An occasional order for 
game traps has been recived this week. 
The discount on " Victor " is now 72 1-2 
per cent, and on " Hawley and Norton " 
60 and 2 1-2 per cent. 

Poultry Netting— The Spring trade is 
commencing now. A few orders were 
received dufinf the week. The discounts 
for 2-inch 19-gauge standard extras are 
60 and 5; for 2-inch 16-gauge, the dis- 
counts are 55 and 5 per cent. 

Wooden Goods— As noted above, the 
market for all wooden goods is very 
firm and advances have been general. 
Prices for wooden bowls and good, grain 
measures are " open " but on the form- 
er there have been advances of from 
25 to 50 per cent, and on the latter about 
10 per cent. 

Wire Nails— The manufacturers report 
'prospects bright for an excellent trade 
in 1904. Business just now is confined 
to a few sorting orders, but the indica- 
tions are that with the opening of navi- 
gation there will be a repetition of the 
exceptionally busy season of 1903. All 
the local mills will soon be running 
full time. We quote as follows : $2.40 per 
keg in carlots, and $2.45 per 
keg in small lots f.o.b. Gananoque, 
Montreal, London, Hamilton, Toronto, 
■ Brantford, Windsor, Ont., and St. John. 

Cut Nails— As was noted last week a 
reduction of 15 cents per keg has been 
made in prices previously quoted. Trade 
is now very quiet. The price is now 
$2.30 per keg f.o.b. Montreal. 

Fence Staples— A few orders are now 
being booked for forward delivery. It 
is expected thai the bulk of the trade in 
fence staples during 1904 will be with 
Manitoba and the Northwest Territories. 
28 



We quote : $3 per 100-lb. keg for galvan- 
ized, and $2.80 for bright; 25 to 50-lb. 
packages, 25c. extra. 

Pressed Spikes— The discount is 25 
per cent. 

Horsenails— There is very little activ- 
ity at present. Prices are unchanged and 
we again quote the following discounts: 
"M" brand, "Oval" and "New City" 
heads, 55 per cent.; "Countersunk" 
heads, 55 per cent.; "C" brand, 40, 10 
and 71-2 per cent, off; "Monarch," 50 
and 71-2 per cent, and "Peerless," 50 
per cent. 

Horseshoes— There is nothing of in- 
terest to note this week. Trade is quiet. 
We again quote as follows: Iron shoes, 
light and medium pattern, No. 2 and 
larger, $3.65; No. 1 and smaller, $3.90; 
snow pattern, No. 2 and larger, $3.90; 
No. 1 and smaller, $4.15; light 
steel shoes, No. 2 and larger, 
$3.80; No. 1 and smaller, $4.05; 
featherweight, all sizes, to 4, $5.35; 
toe weight, all sizes, 1 to 4, $6.60. Shoes 
rAore than one size in a keg, 10c. per keg 
extra f.ob. Montreal onlv. 

Sleighbells — The season is now almost 
over and prices quoted are probably 
subject to some concessions in order to 
clear out stock. Nominally prices 
remain as follows: Back straps, 
30c. to $2 each; body straps, 70c. to 
$2.50 each; shaft gongs, 2 bells, 20c; 3 
bells, 35 to 60c. ; 4 bells, 55c. to $3 each ; 
brass'team bells. No. 1, $1.90 per dozen; 
No. 2, $2.40 per dozen; No. 3, $2.70 per 
dozen; No. 4, $3.70 per dozen; No. 5, 
$4.65 per dozen; York eye bells, No. 10, 
$1.35 per dozen; No. 12, $1.65; No. 14, 
$1.90; saddle gongs, $1.10 to $3 each. 

Skates — Trade is now almost over for 
this season and stocks are reported as 
well cleared out. Nominally there has 
been no change in price, but doubtless 
some concessions are obtainable as 
wholesale houses are anxious to clear 
out their stocks. The prices this season 
have been as follows: Halifax 
pattern, 37c. per pair; nickel-plated, 
65c. : ladies ' nickel-plated, 55c. to $1.25 ; 
ladies' concave nickel-plated, $1.45; 
plain hockey, 27c to $1.35; nickel-plated 
hockey, 60c. to $2.50; double end hock- 
ey, $1.65 to $3. Skate straps, 70c. to 
$1.35. 

Hockey Sticks— The same remarks ap- 
ply to hockey sticks which are now be- 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and 
Metal 



ing offered at reduced prices in order 
to clear. The season has been a good 
one and stocks left in the hands of the 
jobbers are not very large. Prices 
this Winter have been as follows: 
Best second-growth goalkeeper's, $3.80 
per dozen: ash, $2.70; elm, $2.18; boys' 
elm, $1.10. Regulation pucks, $1.50 per 
dozen; boys', $1.15 per dozen. 

Fire Shovels— Still in seasonable de- 
mand. We quote: No. 70, 39c. per 
dozen; No. 55, 55 to 82c. per dozen; No. 
57, 82c. to $1.10 per dozen; No. 60, 70 
to 88c. per dozen; No. 65, $1.10 to $1.23 
per dozen ; Duplex, No. 7, 96c. per doz. ; 
No. 9, $1.20 per dozen; No. 11, $1.54 per 
dozen. 

Snow Shovels— In seasonable request 
at unchanged prices. We quote the fol- 
lowing prices: " Habitant," $2.50 
to $2.75 per dozen; "Victor," 30 per 
cent, off: steel railroad shovels, 45 per 
cent. off. 

Screen Wire Cloth— Wholesalers re- 
port that some good orders have already 
been booked for Spring delivery. The 
price is $1.50 per 100 square feet. 

Galvanized Coil Spring Wire— Gener- 
al business in wire has been brisker this 
week. A considerable improvement has 
been noticed in the demand for galvan- 
ized coil spring wire. We quote the 
following prices: Nos. 6, 7 and 8, $3.20; 
No. 9, $2.70; No. 10, $3.30; No. 11. 
$^.35; No. 12, $2.95; No. 13, $3.10. Car 
lots 5 cents less. Freight prepaid in less 
than car lots to extent of 25 cents and 
in car lots to extent of 20 cents. For 
following factory points freight is equal- 
ized: Montreal, Hamilton, London, Wel- 
land, Windsor, Stratford. 

Galvanized Wire— Business has been 
much brisker since prices for 1904 were 
arranged, two or three weeks ago. Or- 
ders for forward delivery are coming in 
satisfactorily and trade prospects are 
generally reported bright. We quote 
as follows : No. 5, $3.65 ; Nos. 6, 7. 
and 8, $3.10; No. 9, $2.45; No. 10, $3.15; 
No. 11, $3.20; No. 12, $2.60; No. 13, 
$2.70: No. 14, '$3.70. In carlots f.o.b. 
Cleveland, No. 5, $2.15; Nos. 6, 7, 8 and 
9, $2.10; No. 10, $2.15; No. 11, $2.20; 
No. 12. $2.25; No. 13, $2.35; No. 14, 
$2.45. In less than carlots, 12 l-2c. 
extra per 100 lbs. will be charged. 

Barb Wire— Trade in barb wire has 
also improved since the settling of prices. 
Some good business is reported this 
week. We quote as follows: $2.75 
per 100 lbs. f.ob. Montreal and $2.50 
f.o.b. Cleveland. Carlots of 15 tons, 
$2.40 f.o.b. Cleveland. 



Smooth Steel Wire— Trade shows some 
improvement this week. Prices are un- 
changed and we again quote as follows: 
Bright and annealed, $2.50 per 100 lb. 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Halifax, Lon- 
don, Hamilton and St. John. Net ex- 
tras per 100 lb. are now as follows: 
Coppered wire, 60c. ; tinned wire, $2 ; 
oiling, 10c; spring wire, $1.25; best 
steel wire, 75c. ; bright soft-drawn, 15c. ; 
hay-baling wire, 20 to 25c. 

Fine Steel Wire— Trade is quiet at 
present. The discount continues 25 per 
cent, with net extras as follows: 1 and 
2-lb. hanks, 25c. per 100 lb.; 1-2-lb. 
hanks, 37 l-2c, and 1-4-lb. hanks, 50c. 

Brass Wire — Business is fair at un- 
changed discount, viz., 60 per cent. 

Copper Wire — Business fair: discount 
60 per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs— Trade is quiet this 
week so far as immediate shipments arc 
concerned, but a. few orders have been 
booked for forward delivery. Discount: 
remain unchanged as follows: Best iron 
rivets, section carriage and wagon bo ". 
black rivets, tinned do., coopers' rivets 
and tinned swede rivets, 60 and 10 per 
cent. ; swedes iron burrs are quoted at 
55 per cent, off; copper rivets with the 
usual proportion of burrs, 45 per cent, 
off and coppered iron rivets and burrs, 
in 5-lb. carton boxes are quoted at 60 
and 10 per cent, off list. 

Bolts and Nuts— Canadian manufac- 
turers now have the home market to 
themselves as the Americans have been 
driven out by the increased discounts. 
Trade is fair at present and prospects 
are particularly bright. We quote: Car- 
riage bolts, common ($1.00) list, 3-16 
and 1-4 diameter, 60 per cent. ; carriage, 
bolts, common ($1.00) list, 5-16 and 
3-8 diameter, 55 and 5 per cent.; car- 
riage bolts, common ($1.00) list, 7-16 
diameter and up, 55 per cent.; carriage 
bolts, full square ($2.40) list, 60 per 
cent.; carriage bolts, Norway iron 
($3.00) list, 60 per cent.; machine bolts, 
3-8 diameter and under, 60 per cent. ; 
machine bolts, 7-16 diameter and larger, 
55 and 5 per cent. ; plow bolts, 55 and 
5 per cent.; blank bolts, 55 and 5 per 
cent. ; bolt ends, 55 and 5 per cent. ; 
sleigh shoe bolts, 70 per cent.; coach 
screws, cone point, 70 per cent. ; nuts, 
square, all sizes, 4c. per lb. off; nuts, 
hexagon, all sizes, 4 l-4c. per lb. off. 

Washers, 45 per cent. off. 

Screws— A good sorting . trade has 
been transacted this week. Discounts are 
as fololws: Round head bright, 821-2 
per cent.; flat head bright, 871-2 



per cent. ; brass, round head, 75 per 
cent.; brass, flat head, 80 per cent. 

Shot— Trade is dull and there is no- 
thing to note. We again quote: Ordin- 
ary drop shot, A. A. A. to dust, $6.50 per 
100 lb. ; chilled, Nos. 1 to 10, $7 per 100 
lb.; buck and seal, $7.50 per 100 lb.: 
ball, $8 per 100 lb. Trade discount 
]71-2 per cent, f.o.b Montreal, Toronto, 
Ham